A report on John Willock

John Willock (or Willocks or Willox) (c.

- John Willock

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The west façade of the building

St Giles' Cathedral

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Parish church of the Church of Scotland in the Old Town of Edinburgh.

Parish church of the Church of Scotland in the Old Town of Edinburgh.

The west façade of the building
Saint Giles depicted in a boss in the ceiling of the Thistle Chapel
St Giles' in 1647, showing the Tolbooth and Luckenbooths on the north of the church and Parliament House in the kirkyard to its south
David I holds a speculative model of the first St Giles' in a 20th-century window.
Preston Aisle
Statue of John Knox by James Pittendrigh Macgillivray
John Knox preaching the funeral sermon of the Regent Moray, depicted in a 19th-century window
Riot against the introduction of the prayer book
19th century monument to the Marquess of Montrose
The General Assembly of 1787, held in the Preston Aisle of St Giles'
The High Kirk during the visit of George IV in 1822
The interior at the beginning of the 20th century, looking east from the nave
The south side of St Giles' prior to the Burn restoration
St Giles' tower in the Victorian era, showing the clock faces removed in 1911
Jesus ascends into heaven in the east window by Ballantine & Son (1877). Most windows in St Giles' are by the Ballantine firm.
Detail of the north transept window by Douglas Strachan (1922)
The arms of Edinburgh from a medieval plaque in the Preston Aisle
Regent Moray's monument
1879 memorial to Walter Chepman by Francis Skidmore
Memorial to Jenny Geddes (1885)
Memorial to Sophia Jex-Blake designed by Robert Lorimer
The Royal Scots Greys' Sudan memorial by John Rhind (1886)
The congregation's First World War memorial by Henry Snell Gamley (1926)
The royal pew
The bell of
The interior of the Thistle Chapel, looking west
Charles Warr, Minister of St Giles' (right), accompanies the Duke of York (middle) on Remembrance Sunday, 1933.
Alexander Webster preaches in the Tolbooth Kirk in a 1785 caricature by John Kay.
A map of 1877, showing the New North, Old, and High divisions prior to the Chambers restoration

Knox's depute, John Willock, continued to preach even as French soldiers disrupted his sermons and ladders, to be used in the Siege of Leith, were constructed in the church.

John Craig (reformer)

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John Craig (c.

John Craig (c.

The English Cardinal Reginald Pole, one of the Spirituali; he lost the papal election by one vote. Cardinal Pole's archenemy Cardinal Carafa, who would later become Pope Paul IV, acted to suppress the Spirituali before and after attaining the papacy, and under him many went on trial before the Inquisition.
John Craig depicted in 1877
Pope Paul IV. A fellow prisoner at the time was Benjamin Nehemiah ben Elnathan who left an account of his confinement. It has been published under the title Living under the Evil Pope.
Domini Canis? John Craig's dog from the 1883 plaque at St Giles' Cathedral. Critics argued the dog's black colour showed its devilish origin rather than being a sign of God's gracious Providence.
Porto di Ripetta
Magdalen Chapel inscription above the doorway
Window in Edinburgh Castle's Great Hall. George Wishart (c.1513 – 1 Mar 1546), Walter Miln (d. Apr 1558), James Guthrie (1612? – 1 Jun 1661)
John Craig died 1655. Physician to James VI and Charles I. Third son of the reformer's nephew Thomas Craig. This seems to be the portrait of "John Craig" which Hew Scott mentions and Kirkwood Hewat describes in great detail. They both seem to think it was the reformer although Kerr casts doubt on this.
One of Psalms translated by John Craig ("I.C.") ca. AD 1564, Scottish Psalter

John Willock, later one of the "six Johns" of the Scots Confession, was known to have been in London in the summer of 1560 and a meeting has been suggested, Kerr calling it "more than likely".

John Lesley

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Scottish Roman Catholic bishop and historian.

Scottish Roman Catholic bishop and historian.

He was present at the disputation held in Edinburgh in 1561, when Knox and Willox were his antagonists.

The Preaching of Knox before the Lords of the Congregation, 10th June 1559 (David Wilkie, 1832)

Lords of the Congregation

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The Lords of the Congregation (Lairds o the Congregatioun), originally styling themselves "the Faithful", were a group of Protestant Scottish nobles who in the mid-16th century favoured a reformation of the Catholic church according to Protestant principles and a Scottish-English alliance.

The Lords of the Congregation (Lairds o the Congregatioun), originally styling themselves "the Faithful", were a group of Protestant Scottish nobles who in the mid-16th century favoured a reformation of the Catholic church according to Protestant principles and a Scottish-English alliance.

The Preaching of Knox before the Lords of the Congregation, 10th June 1559 (David Wilkie, 1832)

John Willock.

All Saints with Holy Trinity, Loughborough

All Saints Church, Loughborough

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Church of England parish church of the town of Loughborough, Leicestershire within the Diocese of Leicester.

Church of England parish church of the town of Loughborough, Leicestershire within the Diocese of Leicester.

All Saints with Holy Trinity, Loughborough

John Willock 1559 – 1585 (restored)

Quintin Kennedy

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Scottish abbot from a noble background, one of the last Catholic opponents of the Scottish Reformation.

Scottish abbot from a noble background, one of the last Catholic opponents of the Scottish Reformation.

In the spring of 1559 the reformer John Willock, preached in Ayr against the Catholic mass, and Kennedy challenged him to a public discussion.

Book of Discipline (Church of Scotland)

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The Book of Discipline refers to two works regulative of ecclesiastical order in the Church of Scotland, known as The First Book of Discipline (1560) and The Second Book of Discipline (1578), drawn up and printed in the Scottish Reformation.

The Book of Discipline refers to two works regulative of ecclesiastical order in the Church of Scotland, known as The First Book of Discipline (1560) and The Second Book of Discipline (1578), drawn up and printed in the Scottish Reformation.

However, they were unhappy with the document and established a committee of "six Johns", including Knox, John Winram, John Spottiswood, John Willock, John Douglas and John Row, to produce a revised version.