Johns Hopkins Hospital

Johns HopkinsThe Johns Hopkins HospitalJohns Hopkins University HospitalWilmer Eye InstituteJohns Hopkins Medical CenterJohns Hopkins Children's CenterJohns Hopkins Health SystemHospitalJohns Hopkins Oncology CenterJohns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute
The Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH) is the teaching hospital and biomedical research facility of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, located in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. It was founded in 1889 using money from a bequest of over $7 million (1873 money, worth 134.7 million dollars in 2016) by city merchant, banker/financier, civic leader and philanthropist Johns Hopkins (1795–1873).wikipedia
736 Related Articles

Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineJohns Hopkins Medical SchoolJohns Hopkins Medicine
The Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH) is the teaching hospital and biomedical research facility of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, located in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. It was founded in 1889 using money from a bequest of over $7 million (1873 money, worth 134.7 million dollars in 2016) by city merchant, banker/financier, civic leader and philanthropist Johns Hopkins (1795–1873).
The School of Medicine shares a campus with the Johns Hopkins Hospital, established in 1889.

Baltimore

Baltimore, MarylandBaltimore, MDBaltimore City
The Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH) is the teaching hospital and biomedical research facility of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, located in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. It was founded in 1889 using money from a bequest of over $7 million (1873 money, worth 134.7 million dollars in 2016) by city merchant, banker/financier, civic leader and philanthropist Johns Hopkins (1795–1873).
Johns Hopkins Hospital (founded 1889) and Johns Hopkins University (founded 1876) are the city's top two employers.

Johns Hopkins

Imperial CollegeJohns Hopkins Center for Public Health PreparednessJohns Hopkins Hospital
The Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH) is the teaching hospital and biomedical research facility of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, located in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. It was founded in 1889 using money from a bequest of over $7 million (1873 money, worth 134.7 million dollars in 2016) by city merchant, banker/financier, civic leader and philanthropist Johns Hopkins (1795–1873).
His bequests founded numerous institutions bearing his name, most notably Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Johns Hopkins University (including its academic divisions such as Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies).

Leo Kanner

child psychiatry
Many medical specialties were formed at the hospital including neurosurgery, by Dr. Harvey Cushing; cardiac surgery by Dr. Alfred Blalock; and child psychiatry, by Dr. Leo Kanner.
Before working at the Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Kanner practiced as a physician in Germany and in South Dakota.

Harvey Cushing

Harvey Williams CushingDr. Harvey CushingCushing
Many medical specialties were formed at the hospital including neurosurgery, by Dr. Harvey Cushing; cardiac surgery by Dr. Alfred Blalock; and child psychiatry, by Dr. Leo Kanner.
Cushing completed his internship at Massachusetts General Hospital and then did a residency in surgery under the guidance of pioneering surgeon William Stewart Halsted at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore.

Johns Hopkins University

Johns HopkinsThe Johns Hopkins UniversityJohns Hopkins Medical Institutions
In his will, he asked that his fortune be used to found two institutions that would bear his name: "Johns Hopkins University" and "The Johns Hopkins Hospital."
His $7 million bequest (approximately $ million in today's dollars)—of which half financed the establishment of Johns Hopkins Hospital—was the largest philanthropic gift in the history of the United States up to that time.

John Shaw Billings

[5Birthplace John Shaw Billings, M.D. April 12, 1838 - March 11, 1913Dr. John Shaw Billings
Initial plans for the hospital were drafted by surgeon John Shaw Billings, and the architecture designed by John Rudolph Niernsee and completed by Edward Clarke Cabot of the Boston firm of Cabot and Chandler in a Queen Anne style.
He also served as Johns Hopkins Hospital's medical advisor and authored reports regarding criteria for medical and nursing curricula as well as hospital design.

William Osler

Sir William OslerOsler Housethe Osler Medical Service
They were pathologist William Henry Welch, surgeon William Stewart Halsted, internist William Osler, and gynecologist Howard Atwood Kelly.
Sir William Osler, 1st Baronet, (July 12, 1849 – December 29, 1919) was a Canadian physician and one of the four founding professors of Johns Hopkins Hospital.

William Stewart Halsted

William HalstedHalstedWilliam S. Halsted
They were pathologist William Henry Welch, surgeon William Stewart Halsted, internist William Osler, and gynecologist Howard Atwood Kelly.
Along with William Osler (Professor of Medicine), Howard Atwood Kelly (Professor of Gynecology) and William H. Welch (Professor of Pathology), Halsted was one of the "Big Four" founding professors at the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Howard Atwood Kelly

Howard KellyHoward A. KellyKelly Hospital
They were pathologist William Henry Welch, surgeon William Stewart Halsted, internist William Osler, and gynecologist Howard Atwood Kelly.
He, William Osler, William Halsted, and William Welch together are known as the "Big Four", the founding professors at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland.

John Howland (doctor)

John Howland
It was the first children's clinic in the United States that was associated with a medical school, first run by Dr. John Howland.
John Howland (February 3, 1873 – June 20, 1926) was an American pediatrician who spent the majority of his career at Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he established the first full-time pediatric department in the United States.

Edwards A. Park (doctor)

Edwards A. ParkEdward A. Park
Eventually treating over 60,000 children a year, the Harriet Lane Home became a pioneer treatment, teaching, and research clinic, and the first to have subspecialties in pediatrics as created by Edwards A. Park.
Edwards A. Park (December 30, 1877 – July 11, 1969) was a pioneering American pediatrician who established the pediatric heart disease clinic at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, along with other pediatric subspecialties.

John Rudolph Niernsee

NiernseeJohn R. NiernseeNiernsee & Neilson
Initial plans for the hospital were drafted by surgeon John Shaw Billings, and the architecture designed by John Rudolph Niernsee and completed by Edward Clarke Cabot of the Boston firm of Cabot and Chandler in a Queen Anne style.

Walter Reed

Dr. Walter ReedReed PondReed, Walter
Welch was responsible for training many of the outstanding physicians of the day, such as Walter Reed.
During one of his last tours, he completed advanced coursework in pathology and bacteriology in the Johns Hopkins University Hospital Pathology Laboratory.

Helen B. Taussig

Helen TaussigHelen Brooke TaussigDr. Helen B. Taussig
From 1930 to 1963 Helen Taussig, who helped to develop the blue baby operation, headed the pediatric cardiac clinic. Other accomplishments include the development of HeLa, by George Otto Gey, head of tissue culture research in 1951; the first and arguably most important line of human cells grown in culture; identification of the three types of polio virus; and the first "blue baby" operation, which was done by surgeon Alfred Blalock in collaboration with Helen Taussig, a female Hopkins graduate specializing in pediatric cardiology and surgical technician Vivien Thomas which opened the way to modern heart surgery.
The procedure was developed by Alfred Blalock and Vivien Thomas, who were Taussig's colleagues at the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Robert Heyssel

From 1982 to 1992, then CEO Robert Heyssel established the hospital's first Oncology Center, the Nelson Patient Tower, the Clayton Heart Center and the Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center which bears Heyssel's name.
Robert Morris Heyssel, Sr. (June 19, 1928 – June 13, 2001) was President of Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1982 to 1992.

Alfred Blalock

Dr. Alfred BlalockBlalockDr. Blalock
Many medical specialties were formed at the hospital including neurosurgery, by Dr. Harvey Cushing; cardiac surgery by Dr. Alfred Blalock; and child psychiatry, by Dr. Leo Kanner. Other accomplishments include the development of HeLa, by George Otto Gey, head of tissue culture research in 1951; the first and arguably most important line of human cells grown in culture; identification of the three types of polio virus; and the first "blue baby" operation, which was done by surgeon Alfred Blalock in collaboration with Helen Taussig, a female Hopkins graduate specializing in pediatric cardiology and surgical technician Vivien Thomas which opened the way to modern heart surgery.

Harriet Lane

Harriet Lane JohnstonHarriet Rebecca Laneniece
In 1903, Harriet Lane Johnston left a sum of over $400,000 at her death in 1903 to establish the Harriet Lane Home for Invalid Children as a memorial to two sons who had died in childhood.
She dedicated $400,000 to establish the Harriet Lane Home for Invalid Children at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland as a memorial to two sons who had died in childhood.

Diamond Jim Brady

Diamond Jim" BradyJames B. BradyJames Buchanan Brady
In 1912, Diamond Jim Brady donated $220,000 to the hospital, which created the James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute.
Brady donated a significant sum in 1912 to Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, where he had once been treated.

Vivien Thomas

Vivian ThomasThomas, VivienVivien T. Thomas
Other accomplishments include the development of HeLa, by George Otto Gey, head of tissue culture research in 1951; the first and arguably most important line of human cells grown in culture; identification of the three types of polio virus; and the first "blue baby" operation, which was done by surgeon Alfred Blalock in collaboration with Helen Taussig, a female Hopkins graduate specializing in pediatric cardiology and surgical technician Vivien Thomas which opened the way to modern heart surgery.
It was this work that laid the foundation for the revolutionary lifesaving surgery they were to perform at Johns Hopkins a decade later.

Cardiac surgery

open heart surgeryheart surgeryopen-heart surgery
Other accomplishments include the development of HeLa, by George Otto Gey, head of tissue culture research in 1951; the first and arguably most important line of human cells grown in culture; identification of the three types of polio virus; and the first "blue baby" operation, which was done by surgeon Alfred Blalock in collaboration with Helen Taussig, a female Hopkins graduate specializing in pediatric cardiology and surgical technician Vivien Thomas which opened the way to modern heart surgery.
Alfred Blalock, Helen Taussig, and Vivien Thomas performed the first successful palliative pediatric cardiac operation at Johns Hopkins Hospital on November, 29 1944, in a one-year-old girl with Tetralogy of Fallot.

Christus (statue)

ChristusChristus'' (statue)Christ
A familiar sight at the hospital is the marble statue Christus Consolator (or "Christ, The Divine Healer") in the rotunda of the Billings Administration Building.The gift of a Baltimore merchant, William Wallace Spence, it is a replica of the original by Danish sculptor Bertel Thorwaldsen in Copenhagen, Denmark.
A full-size replica of the Christus is located in The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland; the hospital refers to the statue as Christus Consolator.

Brooklandville, Maryland

BrooklandvilleGreenspring Station
In May, 2019, the hospital completed an $80 million expansion project at its Green Spring Station campus in Brooklandville, Maryland, offering out-patient surgery, imaging, and oncology treatment at the 3-story, Pavilion III.
The most notable company with facilities at Green Spring Station is Johns Hopkins Hospital, which has a satellite branch that takes up a large portion of the grounds, and has been operating at this location since 1994.

Hopkins (TV series)

HopkinsHopkins 24/7Hopkins'' (TV series)
Hopkins is a seven-part documentary TV series set at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, a teaching hospital in Baltimore, Maryland (US).

Cardiology

cardiologistcardiologistscardiovascular medicine
She worked with Alfred Blalock and Vivien Thomas at the Johns Hopkins Hospital where they experimented with dogs to look at how they would attempt to surgically cure these "blue babies."