Joseon

Joseon DynastyJoseon (Korea)KoreaJoseon periodKingdom of JoseonKorea (Joseon dynasty)Joseon KoreaJoseon eraKoreanJoseon Kingdom
The Joseon dynasty (also transcribed as Chosŏn or Chosen, 조선; officially the Kingdom of Great Joseon, 대조선국, ) was a Korean dynastic kingdom that lasted for approximately five centuries.wikipedia
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Korean Empire

KoreaEmpire of KoreaGreat Korean Empire
Joseon was founded by Yi Seong-gye in July 1392 and was replaced by the Korean Empire in October 1897.
Proclaimed in October 1897 by Emperor Gojong of the Joseon dynasty, the empire stood until Japan's annexation of Korea in August 1910.

Culture of Korea

Korean cultureKoreanKorea
The Joseon period has left a substantial legacy to modern Korea; much of modern Korean culture, etiquette, norms, and societal attitudes towards current issues, and the modern Korean language and its dialects derive from the culture and traditions of Joseon.
Before the Joseon Dynasty, the practice of Korean shamanism was deeply rooted in Korean culture.

Koreans

KoreanSouth KoreanKorean people
The Joseon dynasty (also transcribed as Chosŏn or Chosen, 조선; officially the Kingdom of Great Joseon, 대조선국, ) was a Korean dynastic kingdom that lasted for approximately five centuries.
The term is derived from the Joseon dynasty, a Korean kingdom founded by Yi Seonggye that lasted for approximately five centuries from 1392 to 1910.

Korean Buddhism

BuddhismKorean BuddhistBuddhist
Buddhism was accordingly discouraged and occasionally faced persecutions by the dynasty.
Though it initially enjoyed wide acceptance, even being supported as the state ideology during the Goryeo period, Buddhism in Korea suffered extreme repression during the Joseon era, which lasted over five hundred years.

Gojoseon

Dangun JoseonFirst KingdomJoseon
After much internal deliberation, as well as endorsement by the neighboring Ming dynasty's emperor, Taejo declared the name of the kingdom to be Joseon, a tribute to the ancient Korean state of Gojoseon.
The addition of Go, meaning "ancient", is used to distinguish it from the later Joseon kingdom (1392–1897).

Taejong of Joseon

TaejongKing TaejongYi Bang-won
That same year, Yi Bangwon assumed the throne of Joseon at long last as King Taejong, third king of Joseon.
Taejong of Joseon (13 June 1367 – 30 May 1422) was the third king of the Joseon dynasty in Korea and the father of King Sejong the Great.

Kaesong

GaeseongKaesŏngGaegyeong
It was founded following the aftermath of the overthrow of Goryeo in what is today the city of Kaesong.
When Yi Songgye overthrew Goryeo in 1392 and established the Joseon as Taejo of Joseon, he moved the Korean capital from Kaesong to Hanyang (modern-day Seoul) in 1394.

Jeongjong of Joseon

JeongjongKing JeongjongJongjong
Aghast at the fact that his sons were willing to kill each other for the crown, and psychologically exhausted from the death of his second wife, King Taejo abdicated and immediately crowned his second son Yi Banggwa as King Jeongjong.
Jeongjong of Joseon (18 July 1357 – 15 October 1419), born Yi Bang-gwa, whose changed name is Yi Gyeong, was the second king of Joseon (or Chosun) Dynasty (1399–1400).

Korean Peninsula

KoreapeninsulaKorean
However, the dynasty was severely weakened during the late 16th and early 17th centuries, when the Japanese invasions of Korea in the 1590s and the first and second Manchu invasions nearly overran the Korean Peninsula, leading to an increasingly harsh isolationist policy, for which the country became known as the "hermit kingdom" in Western literature.
The peninsula's names, in Korean, Chinese and Japanese, all share the same origin, that being Joseon, the old name of Korea under the Joseon Dynasty and Gojoseon even longer before that.

Ōei Invasion

Oei InvasionGihae Eastern ExpeditionThird Tsushima Expedition
In May 1419, King Sejong, under the advice and guidance of his father Taejong, embarked upon the Gihae Eastern Expedition to remove the nuisance of waegu (coastal pirates) who had been operating out of Tsushima Island.
The Ōei Invasion, known as the Gihae Eastern Expedition in Korea, was a 1419 invasion from Joseon against pirate bases on Tsushima Island, which is located in the middle of the Tsushima Strait between the Korean Peninsula and Kyushu.

Korean language

KoreanKorean-languageKorea
The Joseon period has left a substantial legacy to modern Korea; much of modern Korean culture, etiquette, norms, and societal attitudes towards current issues, and the modern Korean language and its dialects derive from the culture and traditions of Joseon.
Consequently, official documents were always written in Hanja during the Joseon era.

Jeong Dojeon

Jeong Do-jeon
Although Yi Bangwon, Taejo's fifth son by Queen Sineui, had contributed most to assisting his father's rise to power, the prime minister Jeong Do-jeon and Nam Eun used their influence on King Taejo to name his eighth son (second son of Queen Sindeok) Grand Prince Uian (Yi Bangseok) as crown prince in 1392.
Jeong Dojeon (Korean: 정도전, Hanja: 鄭道傳, 1342 – October 6, 1398), also known by his pen name Sambong (Korean: 삼봉), was a prominent Korean scholar-official during the late Goryeo to the early Joseon periods.

State Council of Joseon

State CouncilUijeongbuChief State Councilor
In 1399, Taejong had played an influential role in scrapping the Dopyeong Assembly, a council of the old government administration that held a monopoly in court power during the waning years of the Goryeo Dynasty, in favor of the State Council of Joseon, a new branch of central administration that revolved around the king and his edicts.
The State Council of Joseon or Uijeongbu was the highest organ of government under the Joseon Dynasty of Korea.

Kim Jong-seo (general)

Kim JongseoKim Jong-seoGeneral Kim Jong-seo
In 1433, Sejong sent Kim Jong-seo, a government official, north to fend off the Jurchens.
Kim Jongseo, (hangul: 김종서, hanja: 金宗瑞) (1383 – 10 November 1453) was a prominent military official and politician of the early Joseon Dynasty.

Gongyang of Goryeo

GongyangKing GongyangKing Gongyang of Goryeo
He later killed King U and his son after a failed restoration and forcibly placed a royal named Yi on the throne (he became Gongyang of Goryeo).
He was deposed by Yi Seonggye, who then established the Joseon Dynasty.

Munjong of Joseon

MunjongKing MunjongJoseon crown prince
After King Sejong's death, his son Munjong continued his father's legacy but soon died of illness in 1452, just two years after coronation.
Munjong of Joseon (15 November 1414 – 1 June 1452) was the fifth King of the Joseon Dynasty, who ruled Korea from 1450 to 1452.

Danjong of Joseon

DanjongKing DanjongKing Danjong of Joseon
He was succeeded by his twelve-year-old son, Danjong.
Danjong of Joseon (9 August 1441 – 24 December 1457, reigned 1452–1455) was the sixth king of the Joseon Dynasty.

Sejo of Joseon

SejoKing SejoGrand Prince Suyang
However, Danjong's uncle, Sejo, gained control of the government and eventually deposed his nephew to become the seventh king of Joseon himself in 1455.
Sejo of Joseon (조선 세조, 2 November 1417 – 23 September 1468, r. 1455–1468) was the seventh king of the Joseon Dynasty of Korea.

Treaty of Gyehae

Gyehae treatyKakitsu treaty
In 1443, The Treaty of Gyehae was signed in which the daimyō of Tsushima was granted rights to conduct trade with Korea in fifty ships per year in exchange for sending tribute to Korea and aiding to stop any Waegu coastal pirate raids on Korean ports.
The Gyehae Treaty was signed in 1443 ("gyehae" is the Korean name of the year in the sexagenary cycle) between the Joseon dynasty and Sō Sadamori as a means of controlling Japanese piracy and legitimizing trade between Tsushima island and three Korean ports.

Seongjong of Joseon

SeongjongKing SeongjongKing Seongjong of Joseon
Yejong's nephew Seongjong ascended the throne.
Seongjong of Joseon (August 19, 1457 – January 19, 1495) was the ninth king of the Joseon Dynasty of Korea.

Sarim

Sarim scholarsSarim factionSarim political party
His reign was marked by the prosperity and growth of the national economy and the rise of neo-Confucian scholars called sarim who were encouraged by Seongjong to enter court politics.
The Sarim (sometimes Saarim), or "forest of scholars," was a powerful faction of literati that dominated Middle and Late Joseon politics in Korea.

Six martyred ministers

six ministers loyal to DanjongSix Scholars6 martyred ministers
After six ministers loyal to Danjong attempted to assassinate Sejo to return Danjong to the throne, Sejo executed the six ministers and also killed Danjong in his place of exile.
The six martyred ministers or Sayuksin were six ministers of the Joseon Dynasty who were executed by King Sejo in 1456 for plotting to assassinate him and restore the former king Danjong to the throne.

Princess Gyeonghye

Princess Kyunghye
In addition to two regents, Princess Gyeonghye also served as Danjong's guardian and, along with the general Kim Jongso, attempted to strengthen royal authority.
Princess Gyeonghye (1435–1473), also known as Princess Pyeongchang before her marriage, was a Joseon princess and the eldest child of Munjong of Joseon.

Wokou

Japanese pirateswakōpiracy
In May 1419, King Sejong, under the advice and guidance of his father Taejong, embarked upon the Gihae Eastern Expedition to remove the nuisance of waegu (coastal pirates) who had been operating out of Tsushima Island.
Wokou activity in Korea declined after the Gihae Eastern Expedition of the Joseon in 1419, but continued in Ming China and peaked during the Jiajing wokou raids in the mid-1500s, but Chinese reprisals and strong clamp downs on pirates by Japanese authorities saw the wokou virtually disappear by the 1600s.

Yeonsangun of Joseon

YeonsangunPrince YeonsanKing Yeonsan
King Seongjong was succeeded by his son, Yeonsangun, in 1494.
Yeonsan-gun or Prince Yeonsan (23 November 1476 – 20 November 1506, r. 1494–1506), born Yi Yung or Lee Yoong, was the 10th king of Korea's Joseon Dynasty.