Joseph Bazalgette

Sir Joseph BazalgetteSir Joseph William BazalgetteBazalegetteBazalgettefoul airJoseph William BazalgetteSir Joseph BazelgetteSir Joseph William Bazalgette (1819-1891)
Sir Joseph William Bazalgette, CB (28 March 1819 – 15 March 1891) was a 19th-century English civil engineer.wikipedia
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Great Stink

The Great StinkGreat Stink of 1858Great Stink' of 1858
As chief engineer of London's Metropolitan Board of Works his major achievement was the creation (in response to the Great Stink of 1858) of a sewer network for central London which was instrumental in relieving the city from cholera epidemics, while beginning the cleansing of the River Thames.
The authorities accepted a proposal from the civil engineer Joseph Bazalgette to move the effluent eastwards along a series of interconnecting sewers that sloped towards outfalls beyond the metropolitan area.

London sewerage system

sewerage systemsewer systemLondon Brick Sewer
As chief engineer of London's Metropolitan Board of Works his major achievement was the creation (in response to the Great Stink of 1858) of a sewer network for central London which was instrumental in relieving the city from cholera epidemics, while beginning the cleansing of the River Thames.
Joseph Bazalgette, a civil engineer and Chief Engineer of the Metropolitan Board of Works, was given responsibility for the work.

Metropolitan Board of Works

Board of WorksThe Metropolismetropolitan area of London
As chief engineer of London's Metropolitan Board of Works his major achievement was the creation (in response to the Great Stink of 1858) of a sewer network for central London which was instrumental in relieving the city from cholera epidemics, while beginning the cleansing of the River Thames.
A large part of the work of the MBW was under the charge of the Chief Engineer, Joseph Bazalgette, previously engineer with the Metropolitan Commission of Sewers.

Crossness Pumping Station

CrossnessCrossness Sewage Treatment WorksCrossness Engine House
The plan included major pumping stations at Deptford (1864) and at Crossness (1865) on the Erith marshes, both on the south side of the Thames, and at Abbey Mills (in the River Lea valley, 1868) and on the Chelsea Embankment (close to Grosvenor Bridge; 1875), north of the river.
The Crossness Pumping Station is a former sewage pumping station designed by the Metropolitan Board of Works's chief engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette and architect Charles Henry Driver at the eastern end of the Southern Outfall Sewer and the Ridgeway path in the London Borough of Bexley.

Abbey Mills Pumping Station

Abbey MillsAbbey Mills Pumping Stationspumping stations
The plan included major pumping stations at Deptford (1864) and at Crossness (1865) on the Erith marshes, both on the south side of the Thames, and at Abbey Mills (in the River Lea valley, 1868) and on the Chelsea Embankment (close to Grosvenor Bridge; 1875), north of the river.
The original Abbey Mills Pumping Station, in Mill Meads, East London, is a sewage pumping station, designed by engineer Joseph Bazalgette, Edmund Cooper, and architect Charles Driver.

Northern Outfall Sewer

Northern
The outflows were diverted downstream where they were collected in two large sewage outfall systems on the north and south sides of the Thames called the Northern and Southern Outfall sewers. The sewage from the Northern Outfall sewer and that from the Southern Outfall were originally collected in balancing tanks in Beckton and Crossness, respectively, before being dumped, untreated, into the Thames at high tide.
The Northern Outfall Sewer (NOS) is a major gravity sewer which runs from Wick Lane in Hackney to Beckton sewage treatment works in east London (east of Stratford); most of it was designed by Joseph Bazalgette after an outbreak of cholera in 1853 and the "Great Stink" of 1858.

River Thames

ThamesThames Riverthe Thames
As chief engineer of London's Metropolitan Board of Works his major achievement was the creation (in response to the Great Stink of 1858) of a sewer network for central London which was instrumental in relieving the city from cholera epidemics, while beginning the cleansing of the River Thames.
A concerted effort to contain the city's sewage by constructing massive sewer systems on the north and south river embankments followed, under the supervision of engineer Joseph Bazalgette.

John Benjamin Macneill

John MacNeillSir John MacneillSir John Macneil
He began his career working on railway projects, articled to noted engineer Sir John MacNeill and gaining sufficient experience (some in China) in land drainage and reclamation works for him to set up his own London consulting practice in 1842.
Macneill was also a noted teacher of civil engineering (his pupils included Sir Joseph Bazalgette and G. W. Hemans), and in 1842 he was appointed the first Professor of the Practice of Engineering at Trinity College Dublin, a post he held for 10 years.

Beckton

Beckton Sewage Treatment WorksGallions Reach Shopping ParkEast Beckton
The sewage from the Northern Outfall sewer and that from the Southern Outfall were originally collected in balancing tanks in Beckton and Crossness, respectively, before being dumped, untreated, into the Thames at high tide. Partly as a result of the Princess Alice disaster, extensive sewage treatment facilities were built to replace the balancing tanks in Beckton and Crossness in 1900.
Sewage treatment works were first established in 1864 as part of Joseph Bazalgette's scheme to remove sewage (and hence reduce disease) from London by creating two large sewers from the capital, one on each side of the Thames and known as the Southern and Northern Outfall Sewers.

John Martin (painter)

John MartinMartinJohn Martin’s
Bazalgette's solution (similar to a proposal made by painter John Martin 25 years earlier) was to construct a network of 82 mi of enclosed underground brick main sewers to intercept sewage outflows, and 1100 mi of street sewers, to intercept the raw sewage which up until then flowed freely through the streets and thoroughfares of London.
His 1834 plans for London's sewerage system anticipated by some 25 years the 1859 proposals of Joseph Bazalgette to create intercepting sewers complete with walkways along both banks of the River Thames.

Southern Outfall Sewer

SouthernSouthern OutfallSouthern Outfall sewers
The outflows were diverted downstream where they were collected in two large sewage outfall systems on the north and south sides of the Thames called the Northern and Southern Outfall sewers. The sewage from the Northern Outfall sewer and that from the Southern Outfall were originally collected in balancing tanks in Beckton and Crossness, respectively, before being dumped, untreated, into the Thames at high tide.
The Outfall Sewer was designed by Joseph Bazalgette after an outbreak of cholera in 1853 and "The Big Stink" of 1858.

Crossness

Crossness Sewage Treatment WorksCrossness works
The sewage from the Northern Outfall sewer and that from the Southern Outfall were originally collected in balancing tanks in Beckton and Crossness, respectively, before being dumped, untreated, into the Thames at high tide. Partly as a result of the Princess Alice disaster, extensive sewage treatment facilities were built to replace the balancing tanks in Beckton and Crossness in 1900.
Crossness is the location of a large sewage treatment works and the Victorian Crossness Pumping Station, built at the eastern end of the Southern Outfall Sewer as part of the London sewerage system designed by Sir Joseph Bazalgette and constructed between 1859 and 1865.

Miasma theory

miasmamiasma theory of diseasemiasmas
Medical opinion at the time held that cholera was caused by foul air: a so-called miasma.
Early medical and sanitary engineering reformers included Henry Austin, Joseph Bazalgette, Edwin Chadwick, Frank Forster, Thomas Hawksley, William Haywood, Henry Letheby, Robert Rawlinson, Sir John Simon and Thomas Wicksteed.

Metropolitan Commission of Sewers

Metropolitan Commission of Sewers Act 1848Metropolitan Commissioners of Sewers Act 1848sewer commissioners
While he was recovering, London's Metropolitan Commission of Sewers ordered that all cesspits should be closed and that house drains should connect to sewers and empty into the Thames.
The Commission was notable in that it employed Joseph Bazalgette, first as assistant surveyor (from 1849), taking over as Engineer in 1852 after his predecessor died of "harassing fatigues and anxieties".

Chelsea Embankment

ChelseaChelsea Embankment Gardens
The plan included major pumping stations at Deptford (1864) and at Crossness (1865) on the Erith marshes, both on the south side of the Thames, and at Abbey Mills (in the River Lea valley, 1868) and on the Chelsea Embankment (close to Grosvenor Bridge; 1875), north of the river.
The embankment was completed to a design by Joseph Bazalgette and was part of the Metropolitan Board of Works' grand scheme to provide London with a modern sewage system.

Deptford

Deptford, LondonDeptford BroadwayDeptford Green
The plan included major pumping stations at Deptford (1864) and at Crossness (1865) on the Erith marshes, both on the south side of the Thames, and at Abbey Mills (in the River Lea valley, 1868) and on the Chelsea Embankment (close to Grosvenor Bridge; 1875), north of the river.
Close to Deptford Creek is a Victorian pumping station built in 1864, part of the massive London sewerage system designed by civil engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette.

John Snow

Dr John SnowDr. John SnowJohn Snow (physician)
Physician Dr John Snow had earlier advanced a different explanation, which is now known to be correct: cholera was spread by contaminated water.

Albert Bridge, London

Albert BridgeAlbert Suspension Bridge
Designed and built by Rowland Mason Ordish in 1873 as an Ordish–Lefeuvre system modified cable-stayed bridge, it proved to be structurally unsound, so between 1884 and 1887 Sir Joseph Bazalgette incorporated some of the design elements of a suspension bridge.

Victoria Embankment

EmbankmentVictoria Embankment GardensThames Embankment
The Victoria Embankment's construction started in 1865 and was completed in 1870 under the direction of Joseph Bazalgette.

St John's Wood

St. John's WoodSt Johns WoodSt John's Wood, London
Bazalgette lived at 17 Hamilton Terrace, St John's Wood, north London, for some years.

Albert Embankment

White Hart Draw DockAlbertAlbert Embankment Gardens
Created by the engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette for the Metropolitan Board of Works between July 1866 and November 1869, Albert Embankment included land reclaimed from the river and various small timber and boat-building yards, and was intended to protect low-lying areas of Lambeth from flooding while also providing a new highway to bypass local congested streets.

Hammersmith Bridge

HammersmithHammersmith BridgesHammersmith suspension bridge
The current bridge, which is Grade II* listed and was designed by civil engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette, is the second permanent bridge on the site, and has been attacked three times by Irish republicans.

Battersea Bridge

Battersea
In 1879 the bridge was taken into public ownership, and in 1885 demolished and replaced with the existing bridge, designed by Sir Joseph Bazalgette and built by John Mowlem & Co.

Maidstone

Maidstone, KentMaidstone, EnglandBorough of Maidstone
The medieval stone bridge was replaced in 1879 to give better clearance: it was designed by Sir Joseph Bazalgette.

Sinking of SS Princess Alice

Princess AliceSS ''Princess AlicePrincess Alice disaster
Partly as a result of the Princess Alice disaster, extensive sewage treatment facilities were built to replace the balancing tanks in Beckton and Crossness in 1900.
The first boat commissioned in June 1887 was named Bazalgette—after Joseph Bazalgette, who had rebuilt London's sewer system.