Joseph Leidy

LeidyJ. Leidy
Joseph Mellick Leidy (September 9, 1823 – April 30, 1891) was an American paleontologist, parasitologist, geologist, and anatomist.wikipedia
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Leidy Glacier

The Leidy Glacier in NW Greenland was named by Robert Peary after him.
This glacier was named by Robert Peary after paleontologist, parasitologist, and anatomist Joseph Leidy (1823 – 1891), member of the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences.

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

University of Pennsylvania School of MedicinePerelman School of MedicineUniversity of Pennsylvania Medical School
With the support of his stepmother, and after overcoming the opposition of his father (who wanted him to be a sign painter), Leidy studied medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
In the mid-1800s, prominent faculty members included William Pepper, Joseph Leidy, and Nathaniel Chapman (founding president of the American Medical Association).

American lion

Panthera atroxlionsan extinct North American lion
simus), the dire wolf (Canis dirus), and the American lion (Panthera leo atrox''), among many others.
The American lion was designated by American paleontologist Joseph Leidy as Felis atrox in 1853.

Dire wolf

Canis dirusdire wolvesdirewolf
simus), the dire wolf (Canis dirus), and the American lion (Panthera leo atrox''), among many others.
The paleontologist Joseph Leidy determined that the specimen represented an extinct species of wolf and reported it under the name of Canis primaevus.

Edward Drinker Cope

CopeCope EDCope, E.D.
The noted American fossil collector and paleontologist E. D. Cope was a student of Leidy's, but the enmity and ruthless competition that developed between him and rival paleontologist O. C. Marsh eventually drove Leidy out of western American vertebrate paleontology, a field that Leidy had helped to found.
Cope attended the University of Pennsylvania in the 1861 and/or 1862 academic years, studying comparative anatomy under Joseph Leidy, one of the most influential anatomists and paleontologists at the time.

Hadrosaurus

Hadrosaurus foulkiiHadrosaurus minorHadrosaurus cavatus
Leidy named the holotype specimen of Hadrosaurus foulkii, which was recovered from the marl pits of Haddonfield, New Jersey.
Foulke contacted paleontologist Joseph Leidy, and together they recovered an almost complete set of limbs, along with a pelvis, several parts of the feet, 28 vertebrae (including 18 from the tail), eight teeth and two small parts of the jaw.

William Parker Foulke

William Foulke
The specimen was originally discovered by William Parker Foulke.
Born in Philadelphia, and a descendant of Welsh Quakers who had emigrated in 1698, William Parker Foulke was an abolitionist, prison reformer, pamphleteer, philanthropist, lawyer, historian and geologist, the last of which directly led to the discovery, which was partially named for him by Joseph Leidy and for which he is now best-known.

Bone Wars

rivalBone Warbitter rivalry
The noted American fossil collector and paleontologist E. D. Cope was a student of Leidy's, but the enmity and ruthless competition that developed between him and rival paleontologist O. C. Marsh eventually drove Leidy out of western American vertebrate paleontology, a field that Leidy had helped to found.
On one occasion, the two scientists had gone on a fossil-collecting expedition to Cope's marl pits in New Jersey, where William Parker Foulke had discovered the holotype specimen of Hadrosaurus foulkii, described by the paleontologist Joseph Leidy (under whom Cope had studied comparative anatomy); this was one of the first American dinosaur finds, and the pits were still rich with fossils.

Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University

Academy of Natural SciencesAcademy of Natural Sciences of PhiladelphiaPhiladelphia Academy of Natural Sciences
Leidy was an early American supporter of Darwin's theory of evolution, and lobbied successfully for Darwin's election to membership in the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia.
Later during the 19th century, other notable naturalists and scientists, including John James Audubon, Charles S. Boyer, John Cassin, Edward Drinker Cope, Ezra Townsend Cresson, Richard Harlan, Ferdinand V. Hayden, Isaac Lea, John Lawrence LeConte, Joseph Leidy, Samuel Morton, George Ord, and James Rehn were also members.

Elasmosaurus

Elasmosaurus platyuruselasmosaursElasmosaurus orientalis
Marsh claimed Leidy contributed to the falling out of the two by showing Cope in the presence of Marsh that Cope had mistakenly placed the head of a fossil Elasmosaurus on the tail, rather than on the neck, and then publishing a correction.
At an ANSP meeting a year and a half later, in March 1870, the American paleontologist Joseph Leidy (Cope's mentor) noted that Cope's reconstruction of Elasmosaurus showed the skull at the wrong end of the vertebral column, at the end of the tail instead of the neck.

Othniel Charles Marsh

MarshO. C. MarshO.C. Marsh
The noted American fossil collector and paleontologist E. D. Cope was a student of Leidy's, but the enmity and ruthless competition that developed between him and rival paleontologist O. C. Marsh eventually drove Leidy out of western American vertebrate paleontology, a field that Leidy had helped to found.
Cope attempted to buy back the papers containing his flawed reconstruction, but Joseph Leidy exposed his cover-up at a meeting of the Academy of Natural Sciences.

Short-faced bear

ArctodusArctodus simusArctodus pristinus
He also described the holotype specimens of Arctodus (''A.

Wagner Free Institute of Science

The Board of Trustees then appointed Joseph Leidy, a biologist of international reputation, to head its scientific and educational programs.

Trichinosis

trichinellosistrichinatrichinella parasites
Leidy was also a renowned parasitologist, and determined as early as 1846 that trichinosis was caused by a parasite in undercooked meat.
A decade later, American scientist Joseph Leidy pinpointed undercooked meat as the primary vector for the parasite, and two decades afterwards, this hypothesis was fully accepted by the scientific community.

Bison antiquus

ancient bisonbisonB. antiquus
In 1852 Leidy referred Bison antiquus, the North American fossil bison, to the genus Bison, the first to do so.

Geologist

geologistsgeoscientistgeoscientists
Joseph Mellick Leidy (September 9, 1823 – April 30, 1891) was an American paleontologist, parasitologist, geologist, and anatomist.

Anatomy

anatomistanatomicalanatomically
Leidy was professor of anatomy at the University of Pennsylvania, and later was a professor of natural history at Swarthmore College.

University of Pennsylvania

PennThe University of PennsylvaniaPennsylvania
Leidy was professor of anatomy at the University of Pennsylvania, and later was a professor of natural history at Swarthmore College.

Natural history

naturalistnaturalistsnatural historian
Leidy was professor of anatomy at the University of Pennsylvania, and later was a professor of natural history at Swarthmore College.

Swarthmore College

SwarthmoreSwarthmore College Peace CollectionSwarthmore Garnet
Leidy was professor of anatomy at the University of Pennsylvania, and later was a professor of natural history at Swarthmore College.

Robert Peary

Robert E. PearyPearyAdmiral Peary
The Leidy Glacier in NW Greenland was named by Robert Peary after him.

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia, PACity of Philadelphia
Leidy was an early American supporter of Darwin's theory of evolution, and lobbied successfully for Darwin's election to membership in the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. Joseph Leidy was born on September 9, 1823, to an established Philadelphia family of German extraction.

Germans

Germanethnic Germanethnic Germans
Joseph Leidy was born on September 9, 1823, to an established Philadelphia family of German extraction.

Holotype

based ontypeholotype specimen
Leidy named the holotype specimen of Hadrosaurus foulkii, which was recovered from the marl pits of Haddonfield, New Jersey.