Joseph Lister

Joseph Lister, 1st Baron ListerListerLord ListerSir Joseph ListerThe Lord ListerBaron ListerListerianLord Joseph Lister(Joseph) ListerDr Joseph Lister
Joseph Lister, 1st Baron Lister, (5 April 1827 – 10 February 1912), known between 1883 and 1897 as Sir Joseph Lister, Bt., was a British surgeon and a pioneer of antiseptic surgery.wikipedia
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Joseph Jackson Lister

J. J. ListerJ.J ListerLister
Lister came from a prosperous Quaker home in West Ham, Essex, England, a son of wine merchant Joseph Jackson Lister, who was also a pioneer of achromatic object lenses for the compound microscope.
Joseph Jackson Lister, FRS FRMS (11 January 1786 – 24 October 1869) was an amateur British opticist and physicist and the father of Joseph Lister.

Glasgow Royal Infirmary

Royal InfirmaryRoyalRoyal Infirmary, Glasgow
Lister promoted the idea of sterile surgery while working at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary.
In 1926, the surgical block in which Joseph Lister had worked was also torn down for replacement.

Antiseptic

antisepsisantisepticsgermicide
Joseph Lister, 1st Baron Lister, (5 April 1827 – 10 February 1912), known between 1883 and 1897 as Sir Joseph Lister, Bt., was a British surgeon and a pioneer of antiseptic surgery.

Louis Pasteur

PasteurPasteur, LouisPasteurian
Applying Louis Pasteur's advances in microbiology, Lister championed the use of carbolic acid as an antiseptic, so that it became the first widely used antiseptic in surgery. While he was a professor of surgery at the University of Glasgow, Lister became aware of a paper published by the French chemist, Louis Pasteur, showing that food spoilage could occur under anaerobic conditions if micro-organisms were present.
He proposed preventing the entry of micro-organisms into the human body, leading Joseph Lister to develop antiseptic methods in surgery.

Ignaz Semmelweis

SemmelweisIgnaz Philipp SemmelweisIgnác Semmelweis
Despite the work of Ignaz Semmelweis and Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr., hospitals practised surgery under unsanitary conditions.
Semmelweis's practice earned widespread acceptance only years after his death, when Louis Pasteur confirmed the germ theory, and Joseph Lister, acting on the French microbiologist's research, practised and operated, using hygienic methods, with great success.

University of Glasgow

Glasgow UniversityGlasgowGlasgow College
While he was a professor of surgery at the University of Glasgow, Lister became aware of a paper published by the French chemist, Louis Pasteur, showing that food spoilage could occur under anaerobic conditions if micro-organisms were present.
Alumni or former staff of the university include James Wilson (a founding father of the United States), philosopher Francis Hutcheson, engineer James Watt, philosopher and economist Adam Smith, physicist Lord Kelvin, surgeon Joseph Lister, seven Nobel laureates, and three British Prime Ministers.

Alexander Gunn (doctor)

Alexander Gunn
Amongst those he worked with there, who helped him and his work, was the senior apothecary and later MD, Dr Alexander Gunn.
Dr Alexander Gunn through his early association with Joseph Lister, 1st Baron Lister at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh was one of the first doctors to champion the use antiseptic surgery

Surgeon

surgeonsDoctorGeneral Surgeon
Joseph Lister, 1st Baron Lister, (5 April 1827 – 10 February 1912), known between 1883 and 1897 as Sir Joseph Lister, Bt., was a British surgeon and a pioneer of antiseptic surgery.

Microbiology

microbiologistmicrobiologicalbacteriology
Applying Louis Pasteur's advances in microbiology, Lister championed the use of carbolic acid as an antiseptic, so that it became the first widely used antiseptic in surgery.
Joseph Lister was the first to use phenol disinfectant on the open wounds of patients.

Grove House School

Grove School
As a teenager, Lister attended Grove House School in Tottenham, studying mathematics, natural science, and languages.

Marcus Beck

However, Lister did have some supporters including Marcus Beck, a consultant surgeon at University College Hospital, who not only practiced Lister's antiseptic technique, but included it in the next edition of one of the main surgical textbooks of the time.
He was an early proponent of the germ theory of disease and promoted the discoveries of Louis Pasteur, Robert Koch, and Joseph Lister in surgical literature of the time.

Royal College of Surgeons of England

Royal College of SurgeonsFRCSCompany of Surgeons
He registered as a medical student and graduated with honours as Bachelor of Medicine, subsequently entering the Royal College of Surgeons at the age of 26.
The Lister Medal has been awarded since 1924 (mostly on a triennial basis), after the College was entrusted in 1920 with administrating the Lister Memorial Fund, in memory of pioneering British surgeon Joseph Lister.

Phenol

carbolic acidphenoxidephenolate
Lister successfully introduced carbolic acid (now known as phenol) to sterilise surgical instruments and to clean wounds.
The antiseptic properties of phenol were used by Sir Joseph Lister (1827–1912) in his pioneering technique of antiseptic surgery.

Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh

Edinburgh Royal InfirmaryRoyal InfirmaryThe Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh
In 1854, Lister became both first assistant to and friend of surgeon James Syme at the University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh Royal Infirmary in Scotland.
Four years before, Sir Joseph Lister had been appointed as Professor of Surgery to the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh.

King's College Hospital

Kings College HospitalhospitalKing's College
Lister moved from Scotland to King's College Hospital, in London.
Pioneer of aseptic surgery Joseph Lister performed the first major elective surgery under strict antiseptic conditions in 1877.

Surgery

surgicalsurgeonsurgical procedure
Applying Louis Pasteur's advances in microbiology, Lister championed the use of carbolic acid as an antiseptic, so that it became the first widely used antiseptic in surgery.
Until the pioneering work of British surgeon Joseph Lister in the 1860s, most medical men believed that chemical damage from exposures to bad air (see "miasma") was responsible for infections in wounds, and facilities for washing hands or a patient's wounds were not available.

Serjeant Surgeon

Serjeant-SurgeonHonorary Serjeants SurgeonSergeant Surgeon
He had for several years been a Surgeon Extraordinary to Queen Victoria, and from March 1900 was appointed the Serjeant Surgeon to the Queen, thus becoming the senior surgeon in the Medical Household of the Royal Household of the sovereign.
The first serjeant surgeon to receive a peerage was Joseph Lister, the founder of antiseptic surgery, who was created Baron Lister of Lyme Regis in the County of Dorset by Queen Victoria.

Coronation of Edward VII and Alexandra

coronationCoronation of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandracoronation of Edward VII
On 24 August 1902, the King came down with appendicitis two days before his scheduled coronation.
It was undersigned by, among others, Lord Lister and Sir Frederick Treves, who actually carried out the operation on a table in the Music Room at Buckingham Palace, to drain his abdominal cyst.

Lister Medal

Lister Oration
Following his death, a memorial fund led to the founding of the Lister Medal, seen as the most prestigious prize that could be awarded to a surgeon.
It is named after the English surgeon Joseph Lister (1827-1912), whose work on antiseptics established the basis of modern sterile surgery.

Asepsis

asepticsterileaseptic technique
Lister promoted the idea of sterile surgery while working at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary.
After the suggestion by Louis Pasteur, Joseph Lister, 1st Baron Lister introduced the use of carbolic acid as an antiseptic, and in doing so, reduced surgical infection rates.

West Ham

UptonWestWest Ham, London
Lister came from a prosperous Quaker home in West Ham, Essex, England, a son of wine merchant Joseph Jackson Lister, who was also a pioneer of achromatic object lenses for the compound microscope.

1902 Coronation Honours

Coronation Honours list1902 Coronation Honours list
In the 1902 Coronation Honours list published on 26 June 1902 (the original day of King Edward VII´s coronation), Lord Lister was appointed a Privy Counsellor and one of the original members of the new Order of Merit (OM).

University of Edinburgh

Edinburgh UniversityEdinburghThe University of Edinburgh
In 1854, Lister became both first assistant to and friend of surgeon James Syme at the University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh Royal Infirmary in Scotland.
The university is further associated with scientists whose contributions include; laying the foundations of Bayesian statistics (Thomas Bayes), nephrology (Richard Bright), the theory of evolution (Charles Darwin), the initial development of sociology (Adam Ferguson), modern geology (James Hutton), antiseptic surgery (Joseph Lister), classical theory of electromagnetism (James Clerk Maxwell) and thermodynamics (William John Macquorn Rankine); the discovery of carbon dioxide, latent heat and specific heat (Joseph Black), the HPV vaccine (Ian Frazer), the Higgs mechanism (Peter Higgs and Tom Kibble), the Hepatitis B vaccine (Kenneth Murray), nitrogen (Daniel Rutherford), chloroform anaesthesia (James Young Simpson) and SARS (Nanshan Zhong); and the inventing of the telephone (Alexander Graham Bell), the hypodermic syringe (Alexander Wood), the kaleidoscope (David Brewster), the telpherage (Fleeming Jenkin), the vacuum flask (James Dewar), the ATM (John Shepherd-Barron) and the diving chamber (John Scott Haldane).

University College London

University College, LondonUCLUniversity College
Lister attended University College, London, one of only a few institutions which accepted Quakers at that time.

Royal Medical Society

Royal Medical Society of EdinburghMedical Society of EdinburghPRMS
There he joined the Royal Medical Society and presented two dissertations, in 1855 and 1871, which are still in the possession of the Society today.