Joseph Paxton

PaxtonSir Joseph PaxtonPaxt.
Sir Joseph Paxton (3 August 1803 – 8 June 1865) was an English gardener, architect and Member of Parliament, best known for designing the Crystal Palace, and for cultivating the Cavendish banana, the most consumed banana in the Western world.wikipedia
280 Related Articles

The Crystal Palace

Crystal PalaceCrystal Palace CompanyCrystal Palace Bowl
Sir Joseph Paxton (3 August 1803 – 8 June 1865) was an English gardener, architect and Member of Parliament, best known for designing the Crystal Palace, and for cultivating the Cavendish banana, the most consumed banana in the Western world.
Designed by Joseph Paxton, the Great Exhibition building was 1851 ft long, with an interior height of 128 ft. It was three times larger than the size of St Paul's Cathedral.

Cavendish banana

Cavendishbananasbanana
Sir Joseph Paxton (3 August 1803 – 8 June 1865) was an English gardener, architect and Member of Parliament, best known for designing the Crystal Palace, and for cultivating the Cavendish banana, the most consumed banana in the Western world.
His head gardener and friend, Sir Joseph Paxton cultivated them in the greenhouses of Chatsworth House.

Milton Bryan

Church End (Milton Bryan)
Paxton was born in 1803, the seventh son of a farming family, in Milton Bryan, Bedfordshire.
The village is best known for being the birthplace of Joseph Paxton, the designer of the Crystal Palace, who was born in Milton Bryan as the seventh son of a farming family along with its role in the Second World War.

Hyde Park, London

Hyde ParkLondon's Hyde ParkHyde-Park
There was an outcry by the public and in Parliament against the desecration of Hyde Park.
The Great Exhibition of 1851 was held in the park, for which The Crystal Palace, designed by Joseph Paxton, was erected.

Eduard Ortgies

Ortgies
He entrusted it to Eduard Ortgies, a young gardener and within two months the leaves were 4.5 ft in diameter, and a month later it flowered.
The designer of the sumptuous grounds and residence was gardener and architect Joseph Paxton, who entrusted young Eduard with the care of Victoria regia which in 1849 existed in England only as a few seedlings raised by the Royal Botanic Garden at Kew.

William Cavendish, 6th Duke of Devonshire

6th Duke of DevonshireDuke of DevonshireThe Duke of Devonshire
The Horticultural Society's gardens were close to the gardens of William Cavendish, 6th Duke of Devonshire at Chiswick House.
He befriended Sir Joseph Paxton, then employed at the Royal Horticultural Society's Chiswick Gardens, located close to Devonshire's London estate Chiswick House, and appointed him his head gardener at Chatsworth House in 1826, despite Paxton being only in his early twenties at the time.

Battlesden House

Battlesden ManorBattlesden Park
He became a garden boy at the age of fifteen for Sir Gregory Osborne Page-Turner at Battlesden Park, near Woburn.
This had 40 rooms and a large ballroom and cost £70,000 to build, while the surrounding parkland and lake were created by Sir Joseph Paxton.

Edensor

Edensor Housevillage
Among several other large projects at Chatsworth were the rock garden, the Emperor Fountain and rebuilding Edensor village.
The planning of the new village was overseen by Joseph Paxton (later Sir Joseph Paxton); in 1840 he was joined in designing houses by John Robertson.

The Illustrated London News

Illustrated London NewsIllustrated London News CompanyIllustrated London News Ltd
Paxton decided to by-pass the Commission and published the design in the Illustrated London News to universal acclaim.
In 1851, after the newspaper published Joseph Paxton's designs for the Crystal Palace before even Prince Albert had seen them, the circulation rose to 130,000.

Chatsworth House

ChatsworthChatsworth EstateChatsworth House estate
He offered the 20-year-old Paxton the position of head gardener at Chatsworth, which was considered one of the finest landscaped gardens of the time.
In 1826 a 23-year-old named Joseph Paxton, who had been trained at Kew Gardens, was appointed head gardener at Chatsworth.

Great Victorian Way

In June 1855 he presented a scheme he called the Great Victorian Way to the Parliamentary Select Committee on Metropolitan Communications in which he envisioned the construction of an arcade, based on the structure of the Crystal Palace, in a ten-mile loop around the centre of London.
The Great Victorian Way was an unbuilt infrastructure project, plans for which were presented to the Parliamentary Select Committee on Metropolitan Communications by its designer Joseph Paxton in June 1855.

Chiswick House

Chiswick
The Horticultural Society's gardens were close to the gardens of William Cavendish, 6th Duke of Devonshire at Chiswick House.
The garden designer Joseph Paxton, creator of the Crystal Palace, started his career in the gardens at Chiswick for the Royal Horticultural Society before his talents were recognised by William Cavendish, the sixth Duke of Devonshire and he relocated as head gardener to Chatsworth House, Derbyshire.

Birkenhead Park

BirkenheadBirkenhead Park Main EntranceBirkenhead Parkrun
He worked on public parks in Liverpool, Birkenhead, Glasgow, Halifax (the People's Park) and the grounds of the Spa Buildings at Scarborough.
It was designed by Joseph Paxton and opened on 5 April 1847.

Charles Fox (civil and railway engineer)

Charles FoxSir Charles FoxCharles (later Sir Charles) Fox
In its construction, Paxton was assisted by Charles Fox, also of Derby for the iron framework, and William Cubitt, Chairman of the Building Committee.
Fox and Henderson's expertise with structural ironwork led Joseph Paxton to invite them to build The Crystal Palace for The Great Exhibition of 1851.

The Gardeners' Chronicle

Gardeners' ChronicleThe Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural GazetteGardener' Chronicle
In addition to these titles he also, in 1841, co-founded perhaps the most famous horticultural periodical, The Gardeners' Chronicle along with John Lindley, Charles Wentworth Dilke and William Bradbury and later became its editor.
Founded in 1841 by the horticulturists Joseph Paxton, Charles Wentworth Dilke, John Lindley and the printer William Bradbury it originally took the form of a traditional newspaper, with both national and foreign news, but also with vast amounts of material sent in by gardeners and scientists, covering every conceivable aspect of gardening.

Victoria amazonica

Giant Water LilyAmazon water lilyAmazonia Victoria Regia
The next great building at Chatsworth was built for the first seeds of the Victoria regia lily which had been sent to Kew from the Amazon in 1836.
In the end, the two aforementioned Dukes became the first to achieve this, Joseph Paxton (for the Duke of Devonshire) being the first in November 1849 by replicating the lily's warm swampy habitat (not easy in winter in England with only coal-fired boilers for heating),

Mentmore Towers

MentmoreCrafton StudMentmore Park
In 1850, Paxton was commissioned by Baron Mayer de Rothschild to design Mentmore Towers in Buckinghamshire.
Sir Joseph Paxton and his son-in-law, George Henry Stokes, designed the building in the 19th-century revival of late 16th and early 17th-century Elizabethan and Jacobean styles called Jacobethan The house was designed for the banker and collector of fine art Baron Mayer de Rothschild as a country home, and as a display case for his collection of fine art.

London Road Cemetery

This became the London Road Cemetery, where a memorial to Paxton by Joseph Goddard was erected in 1868.
London Road Cemetery is a 17 ha cemetery in Coventry, England, designed by Joseph Paxton and opened in 1847.

Emperor Fountain

While at Chatsworth, he built the Emperor Fountain in 1844, it was twice the height of Nelson's Column and required the creation of a feeder lake on the hill above the gardens necessitating the excavation of 100000 yd3 of earth.
In anticipation of this visit, William Cavendish, 6th Duke of Devonshire decided to construct the world's highest fountain, and set Joseph Paxton to work to build it.

Wentworth Dilke

Charles Wentworth DilkeCharles DilkeSir Charles Wentworth Dilke
In addition to these titles he also, in 1841, co-founded perhaps the most famous horticultural periodical, The Gardeners' Chronicle along with John Lindley, Charles Wentworth Dilke and William Bradbury and later became its editor.
In 1841 he co-founded The Gardeners' Chronicle alongside Joseph Paxton, John Lindley and William Bradbury.

Château de Ferrières

Chateau de Ferrières
Following the completion of Mentmore, Baron James de Rothschild, one of Baron de Rothschild's French cousins, commissioned Château de Ferrières at Ferrières-en-Brie near Paris to be "Another Mentmore, but twice the size".
Sitting at the crest of a long entry drive, the château was designed by the British architect Joseph Paxton.

John Lindley

Lindl.LindleyLindl
In addition to these titles he also, in 1841, co-founded perhaps the most famous horticultural periodical, The Gardeners' Chronicle along with John Lindley, Charles Wentworth Dilke and William Bradbury and later became its editor.
The Government commissioned a report on their future to be prepared by Lindley, Joseph Paxton and John Wilson, head gardener to the Earl of Surrey.

High Peak Rifles

40th (Sherwood Foresters) S/L Rgt1/6th Battalion2/6th Battalion
On 17 March 1860, during the enthusiasm for the Volunteer movement, Paxton raised and commanded the 11th (Matlock) Derbyshire Rifle Volunteer Corps.
11th (Matlock) Derbyshire RVC under the command of Sir Joseph Paxton (17 March 1860)

Halifax, West Yorkshire

HalifaxHalifax, YorkshireHalifax CB
He worked on public parks in Liverpool, Birkenhead, Glasgow, Halifax (the People's Park) and the grounds of the Spa Buildings at Scarborough.
People's Park is a public park originally designed by Joseph Paxton, given to the people of Halifax in 1857 by Sir Francis Crossley.

People's Park, Halifax

People's Parkpark
He worked on public parks in Liverpool, Birkenhead, Glasgow, Halifax (the People's Park) and the grounds of the Spa Buildings at Scarborough.
The park was originally designed by Joseph Paxton, but suffering neglect in the late 20th century until a major restoration project which started in 1995.