Joseph Stalin

StalinJosef StalinJosif StalinStalinistJoseph Vissarionovich StalinIosif StalinJoe StalinStalin eraI.V. StalinJoe Steele
Joseph Vissarionovich Stalin (born Ioseb Besarionis dzе Jughashvili; 18 December 1878 – 5 March 1953) was a Georgian revolutionary and Soviet politician who led the Soviet Union from the mid–1920s until 1953 as the general secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (1922–1952) and premier of the Soviet Union (1941–1953).wikipedia
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Marxism–Leninism

Marxism-LeninismMarxist-LeninistMarxist–Leninist
A communist ideologically committed to the Leninist interpretation of Marxism, Stalin formalised these ideas as Marxism–Leninism, while his own policies are known as Stalinism.
Marxism–Leninism is a political ideology developed by Joseph Stalin in the late 1920s.

Stalinism

StalinistStalinistsStalinization
A communist ideologically committed to the Leninist interpretation of Marxism, Stalin formalised these ideas as Marxism–Leninism, while his own policies are known as Stalinism.
Stalinism is the means of governing and related policies implemented from 1927 to 1953 by Joseph Stalin (1878–1953).

Rise of Joseph Stalin

consolidation of powerassumed leadership over the countryconsolidated his power
Serving in the Russian Civil War before overseeing the Soviet Union's establishment in 1922, Stalin assumed leadership over the country following Lenin's 1924 death.
Joseph Stalin was the [[General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union|General Secretary]] of Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union from 1922 until his death in 1953.

Socialism in One Country

socialism could be built in one countryagendaCommunism in one city
Under Stalin, "Socialism in One Country" became a central tenet of the party's dogma.
Socialism in one country was a theory put forth by Joseph Stalin and Nikolai Bukharin in 1924 which was eventually adopted by the Soviet Union as state policy.

Collectivization in the Soviet Union

collectivizationcollectivisationcollectivization of agriculture
Through the Five-Year Plans, the country underwent agricultural collectivisation and rapid industrialisation, creating a centralised command economy.
The Soviet Union implemented the collectivization of its agricultural sector between 1928 and 1940 during the ascendancy of Joseph Stalin.

Communist Party of the Soviet Union

Communist PartyCPSUBolshevik Party
Joseph Vissarionovich Stalin (born Ioseb Besarionis dzе Jughashvili; 18 December 1878 – 5 March 1953) was a Georgian revolutionary and Soviet politician who led the Soviet Union from the mid–1920s until 1953 as the general secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (1922–1952) and premier of the Soviet Union (1941–1953).
In 1929, as Joseph Stalin became the leader of the party, Marxism–Leninism, a fusion of the original ideas of German philosopher and economic theorist Karl Marx, and Lenin, became formalized as the party's guiding ideology and would remain so throughout the rest of its existence.

Collective leadership in the Soviet Union

collective leadershipcollective ruleCollectivity of leadership
Despite initially governing the Soviet Union as part of a collective leadership, he eventually consolidated power to become the country's de facto dictator by the 1930s.
Its main task was to distribute powers and functions among the Politburo and the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, as well as the Council of Ministers, to hinder any attempts to create a one-man dominance over the Soviet political system by a Soviet leader, such as that seen under Joseph Stalin's rule.

Georgia (country)

GeorgiaGeorgianRepublic of Georgia
Born to a poor family in Gori in the Russian Empire (now Georgia), Stalin joined the Marxist Russian Social Democratic Labour Party as a youth.
After Soviet leader Joseph Stalin, a native Georgian, died in 1953, a wave of protest spread against Nikita Khrushchev and his de-Stalinization reforms, leading to the death of nearly one hundred students in 1956.

Communist International

CominternThird InternationalKomintern
Stalin's government promoted Marxism–Leninism abroad through the Communist International and supported European anti-fascist movements during the 1930s, particularly in the Spanish Civil War.
The Comintern was dissolved by Stalin in 1943 to avoid antagonizing his wartime allies, the United States and the United Kingdom.

Soviet atomic bomb project

Soviet atomic bombatomic bomb projectSoviet nuclear program
Stalin led his country through the post-war reconstruction, during which it developed a nuclear weapon in 1949.
The Soviet atomic bomb project (Russian: Советский проект атомной бомбы, Sovetskiy proyekt atomnoy bomby) was the classified research and development program that was authorized by Joseph Stalin in the Soviet Union to develop nuclear weapons during World War II.

Death and state funeral of Joseph Stalin

Stalin's deathdeath of Stalindeath
After Stalin's death in 1953 he was eventually succeeded by Nikita Khrushchev, who denounced his predecessor and initiated the de-Stalinisation of Soviet society.
Joseph Stalin, the second leader of the Soviet Union, died on 5 March 1953 at the Kuntsevo Dacha aged 74 after suffering a stroke.

Great Purge

Great TerrorStalinist purgespurges
To eradicate accused "enemies of the working class", Stalin instituted the "Great Purge", in which over a million were imprisoned and at least 700,000 executed between 1934 and 1939.
The term "repression" was officially used to describe the prosecution of people considered counter-revolutionaries and enemies of the people by the leader of the Soviet Union at the time, Joseph Stalin.

Vladimir Lenin

LeninV. I. LeninVladimir Ilyich Lenin
He edited the party's newspaper, Pravda, and raised funds for Vladimir Lenin's Bolshevik faction via robberies, kidnappings, and protection rackets.
His health failing, Lenin died in Gorki, with Joseph Stalin succeeding him as the pre-eminent figure in the Soviet government.

Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact

Molotov-Ribbentrop PactNazi-Soviet PactHitler-Stalin Pact
In 1939, it signed a non-aggression pact with Nazi Germany, resulting in the Soviet invasion of Poland.
Soviet leader Joseph Stalin ordered the Soviet invasion of Poland on 17 September, one day after a Soviet–Japanese ceasefire at the Khalkhin Gol came into effect.

Gori, Georgia

GoriTontioGori city
Born to a poor family in Gori in the Russian Empire (now Georgia), Stalin joined the Marxist Russian Social Democratic Labour Party as a youth.
Gori is also known as the birthplace of the Soviet leader Joseph Stalin, ballistic missile designer Alexander Nadiradze and philosopher Merab Mamardashvili.

Enemy of the people

enemies of the peopleclass enemiesclass enemy
To eradicate accused "enemies of the working class", Stalin instituted the "Great Purge", in which over a million were imprisoned and at least 700,000 executed between 1934 and 1939.
The Soviet Union made extensive use of the term until 1956, notably Stalin, who used it to describe anybody critical of himself personally.

Population transfer in the Soviet Union

deportedpopulation transferdeportations
Conversely, his totalitarian government has been widely condemned for overseeing mass repressions, ethnic cleansing, deportations, hundreds of thousands of executions, and famines which killed millions.
Population transfer in the Soviet Union was the forced transfer of various groups from the 1930s up to the 1950s ordered by Joseph Stalin.

Leninism

Leninistcadrescadre
A communist ideologically committed to the Leninist interpretation of Marxism, Stalin formalised these ideas as Marxism–Leninism, while his own policies are known as Stalinism.
In the 1925–1929 period, Joseph Stalin established his interpretation of Leninism as the official and only legitimate form of Marxism in Russia by amalgamating the political philosophies as Marxism–Leninism, which then became the state ideology of the Soviet Union.

Stalin's cult of personality

cult of personalityhis cult of personalitypersonality cult
Widely considered one of the 20th century's most significant figures, Stalin was the subject of a pervasive personality cult within the international Marxist–Leninist movement which revered him as a champion of the working class and socialism.
Joseph Stalin's cult of personality became a prominent part of Soviet culture in December 1929, after a lavish celebration for Stalin's 50th birthday.

De-Stalinization

destalinizationde-Stalinisationdestalinisation
After Stalin's death in 1953 he was eventually succeeded by Nikita Khrushchev, who denounced his predecessor and initiated the de-Stalinisation of Soviet society.
De-Stalinisation (Russian: десталинизация, destalinizatsiya) consisted of a series of political reforms in the Soviet Union after the death of long-time dictator Joseph Stalin in 1953, and the ascension of Nikita Khrushchev to power.

Keke Geladze

Ekaterine GeladzeEkaterina GeladzeEkaterine
His parents, Besarion Jughashvili and Ekaterine Geladze, were ethnically Georgian, and Stalin grew up speaking the Georgian language.
Ekaterine Giorgis asuli Geladze (1856/1858 – 4 June 1937), commonly known as "Keke", was the mother of Joseph Stalin.

Nikita Khrushchev

KhrushchevNikita S. KhrushchevNikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev
After Stalin's death in 1953 he was eventually succeeded by Nikita Khrushchev, who denounced his predecessor and initiated the de-Stalinisation of Soviet society.
He supported Joseph Stalin's purges, and approved thousands of arrests.

Besarion Jughashvili

Vissarion DzhugashvilifatherVissarion Jughashvili
His parents, Besarion Jughashvili and Ekaterine Geladze, were ethnically Georgian, and Stalin grew up speaking the Georgian language.
1850 – 25 August 1909) was the father of Joseph Stalin.

Ideology of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

Soviet communismSoviet ideologySoviet Marxism
Under Stalin, "Socialism in One Country" became a central tenet of the party's dogma.
The state ideology of the Soviet Union—and thus Marxism–Leninism—derived and developed from the theories, policies and political praxis of Lenin and Stalin.

Anti-fascism

anti-fascistantifascistanti-Nazi
Stalin's government promoted Marxism–Leninism abroad through the Communist International and supported European anti-fascist movements during the 1930s, particularly in the Spanish Civil War.
Davies further asserts that the concept of anti-fascism is a "mere political dance" created by Josef Stalin and spread by Soviet propaganda organs in an attempt to create the false impression that Western democrats by joining the USSR in the opposition to fascism could in general align themselves politically with communism.