A report on Journalism

Photojournalists photographing US President Barack Obama in November 2013.
Photo and broadcast journalists interviewing a government official after a building collapse in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. March 2013.
Media greeting Cap Anamur II's Rupert Neudeck in Hamburg, 1986 at a press conference
Walter Lippmann in 1914
Journalists at a press conference
Journalist interviewing a cosplayer
News photographers and reporters waiting behind a police line in New York City, in May 1994
Turkish journalists protesting imprisonment of their colleagues on Human Rights Day, 10 December 2016
Number of journalists reported killed between 2002 and 2013

Production and distribution of reports on the interaction of events, facts, ideas, and people that are the "news of the day" and that informs society to at least some degree.

- Journalism
Photojournalists photographing US President Barack Obama in November 2013.

31 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Journalist

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Individual that collects/gathers information in form of text, audio or pictures, processes them to a news-worthy form and disseminates it to the public.

Individual that collects/gathers information in form of text, audio or pictures, processes them to a news-worthy form and disseminates it to the public.

Jamal Khashoggi, killed inside Saudi Arabia's consulate in Istanbul on 2 October 2018
A program director sets the task for TV journalists, 1998.
A reporter interviews a man in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, 2009.
Journalist interviews a cosplayer, 2012.
A reporter interviewing Boris Johnson when he was Mayor of London, 2014
Official tastes the water of a new well in front of journalists in Mogadishu, Somalia, 2014.
Cameraman and journalist who interviews a person in Austria

The act or process mainly done by the journalist is called journalism.

Causes of death in the US vs media coverage. The percentage of media attention for terrorism, homicide or suicide is much greater than the percentage of deaths caused by it.

Sensationalism

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Causes of death in the US vs media coverage. The percentage of media attention for terrorism, homicide or suicide is much greater than the percentage of deaths caused by it.
American cartoon, published in 1898: "Remember the Maine! And Don't Forget the Starving Cubans!" Such sensationalist cartoons were used to support American intervention in the Cuban War of Independence.

In journalism and mass media, sensationalism is a type of editorial tactic.

Display rack of British tabloids.

Tabloid journalism

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Display rack of British tabloids.

Tabloid journalism is a popular style of largely sensationalist journalism (usually dramatized and sometimes unverifiable or even blatantly false), which takes its name from the tabloid newspaper format: a small-sized newspaper also known as half broadsheet.

Al Jazeera English newsroom, Doha, 2011

News

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Information about current events.

Information about current events.

Al Jazeera English newsroom, Doha, 2011
Woodcut by Tommaso Garzoni depicting a town crier with a trumpet
Reproduction of Kaiyuan Za Bao court newspaper from the Tang dynasty
Some European postal routes in 1563
World railway and telegraph system, 1900
A newspaper is one of the most common ways to receive the latest news.
Reuters office in Bonn, Germany, 1988

News values are the professional norms of journalism.

National Guardsman in Washington D.C. (2021)

Photojournalism

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National Guardsman in Washington D.C. (2021)
'Barricades on rue Saint-Maur' (1848), the first photo used to illustrate a newspaper story
The Crawlers, London, 1876–1877, a photograph from John Thomson's Street Life in London photo-documentary
"Geronimo's camp before surrender to General Crook, March 27, 1886: Geronimo and Natches mounted; Geronimo's son (Perico) standing at his side holding baby." By C. S. Fly.
The Berliner Illustrirte Zeitung pioneered modern photojournalism and was widely copied. Pictured, the cover of issue of 26 August 1936: a meeting between Francisco Franco and Emilio Mola.
In Migrant Mother Dorothea Lange produced the seminal image of the Great Depression. The FSA also employed several other photojournalists to document the depression.
Boy destroying piano at Pant-y-Waen, South Wales, by Philip Jones Griffiths, 1961
Sports photojournalists at Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Photojournalists at the 2016 Labour Party Conference in Liverpool
Roger Fenton's Photographic Van, 1855, formerly a wine merchant's wagon; his assistant is pictured at the front.
Leica 1, (1925)'s introduction marked the beginning of modern photojournalism.

Photojournalism is journalism that uses images to tell a news story.

The Yellow Kid, published by both New York World and New York Journal

Yellow journalism

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The Yellow Kid, published by both New York World and New York Journal
"Evil spirits", such as "Paid Puffery" and "Suggestiveness", spew from "the modern daily press" in this Puck cartoon of November 21, 1888
"The Yellow Press", by L. M. Glackens, portrays William Randolph Hearst as a jester distributing sensational stories
"Yellow journalism" cartoon about Spanish–American War of 1898. The newspaper publishers Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst are both attired as the Yellow Kid comics character of the time, and are competitively claiming ownership of the war.
Male Spanish officials strip search an American woman tourist in Cuba looking for messages from rebels; front page "yellow journalism" from Hearst (Artist: Frederic Remington)
Pulitzer's treatment in the World emphasizes a horrible explosion
Hearst's treatment was more effective and focused on the enemy who set the bomb—and offered a huge reward to readers

Yellow journalism and yellow press are American terms for journalism and associated newspapers that present little or no legitimate, well-researched news while instead using eye-catching headlines for increased sales.

Person reading a newspaper

Newspaper

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Periodical publication containing written information about current events and is often typed in black ink with a white or gray background.

Periodical publication containing written information about current events and is often typed in black ink with a white or gray background.

Person reading a newspaper
Front page of The New York Times on Armistice Day, 11 November 1918
Title page of Carolus' Relation from 1609, the earliest newspaper
Josef Danhauser, Newspaper readers, 1840.
Fanciful drawing of a general store by Marguerite Martyn in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch of October 21, 1906. On the far left, a group of men share reading a newspaper.
The front page of the Helsingin Sanomat ("Helsinki Times") on July 7, 1904
Newspaper stand in Salta (Argentina).
International newspapers on sale in Paris, France
Soldiers in an East German tank unit reading about the erection of the Berlin Wall in 1961 in the newspaper Neues Deutschland
The newsroom of Gazeta Lubuska in Zielona Góra, Poland
The office building of Tyrvään Sanomat in Sastamala, Finland
The Telegraph Printing House in Macon, Georgia circa 1876
A newsboy in 1905 selling the Toronto Telegram in Canada
Israeli daily newspaper Haaretz, seen in its Hebrew and English language editions
TheYomiuri Shimbun, a broadsheet in Japan credited with having the largest newspaper circulation in the world
The editorial staff of the newspaper Severnyi Kray in Yaroslavl, Russia in 1900
Newspaper press in Limoges, France
Newspaper vendor, Paddington, London, February 2005
1938 Dutch newspaper advertisement for women's clothing sold at C&A stores
US newspaper advertising revenue—Newspaper Association of America published data<ref name=NAAdata>{{cite web|title=Trends & Numbers |date=14 March 2012 |publisher=Newspaper Association of America |access-date=18 September 2012 |url=http://www.naa.org/Trends-and-Numbers/Advertising-Expenditures/Annual-All-Categories.aspx |url-status=dead |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20120918094825/http://www.naa.org/Trends-and-Numbers/Advertising-Expenditures/Annual-All-Categories.aspx |archive-date=18 September 2012 }}</ref>

The journalism organizations that publish newspapers are themselves often metonymically called newspapers.

The data-driven journalism process.

Data journalism

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Journalistic process based on analyzing and filtering large data sets for the purpose of creating or elevating a news story.

Journalistic process based on analyzing and filtering large data sets for the purpose of creating or elevating a news story.

The data-driven journalism process.

Data journalism is a type of journalism reflecting the increased role that numerical data is used in the production and distribution of information in the digital era.

Business journalism

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Business journalism is the part of journalism that tracks, records, analyzes and interprets the business, economic and financial activities and changes that take place in societies.

The "Gonzo fist", characterized by two thumbs and four fingers holding a peyote button, was originally used in Hunter S. Thompson's 1970 campaign for sheriff of Pitkin County, Colorado. It has since evolved into a symbol for gonzo journalism.

Gonzo journalism

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The "Gonzo fist", characterized by two thumbs and four fingers holding a peyote button, was originally used in Hunter S. Thompson's 1970 campaign for sheriff of Pitkin County, Colorado. It has since evolved into a symbol for gonzo journalism.

Gonzo journalism is a style of journalism that is written without claims of objectivity, often including the reporter as part of the story using a first-person narrative.