Juan Bautista de Anza

De Anza ExpeditionAnza Expeditionde AnzaAnzaCaptain Juan Bautista de AnzaexpeditionJuan Bautista de Anza expeditionAnza Colonizing ExpeditionAnza Partyde Anza expeditions
Juan Bautista de Anza (July 6/7, 1736 – December 19, 1788) was born in the Spanish province of New Navarre in Viceroyalty of New Spain.wikipedia
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History of California

CaliforniaCalifornia TerritorySpanish California
He is credited as one of the founding fathers of Spanish California and served as an official within New Spain as Governor of the Province of New Mexico.
Juan Bautista de Anza, leading an exploratory expedition on January 8, 1774, with 3 padres, 20 soldiers, 11 servants, 35 mules, 65 cattle, and 140 horses set forth from Tubac south of present-day Tucson, Arizona.

Fronteras

Fronteras, SonoraMisión de Cuquiárachi
Juan Bautista de Anza Bezerra Nieto was born in Fronteras, New Navarre, New Spain (today Sonora, Mexico) in 1736 (near Arizpe), most probably at Cuquiarachi, Sonora, but possibly at the Presidio of Fronteras.
The Spanish explorer Juan Bautista de Anza (1735-1788), born in Fronteras, led the first Spanish overland expedition to the Las Californias Province of New Spain in 1769, previously only sighted and claimed for the Crown from the sea.

Mission San Francisco de Asís

Mission DoloresMission San Francisco de AsisMission Dolores Basilica
Pressing on, Anza located the sites for the Presidio of San Francisco and Mission San Francisco de Asis in present-day San Francisco, California on March 28, 1776.
The Mission was founded on October 9, 1776, by Francisco Palóu (a companion of Junípero Serra) and Co-founder Fray Pedro Combón, both members of the de Anza Expedition, which had been charged with bringing Spanish settlers to Alta (upper) California and with evangelizing the local Natives, the Ohlone.

Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail

Anza Trailtrailde Anza Trail
Today this route is marked as the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail. The primary legacy is the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail in California and Arizona, administered by the US National Park Service, for hiking and driving the route of his expedition exploring Las Californias In the San Fernando Valley the trail crosses the Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve, and in the San Gabriel Valley the trail is in the Puente Hills just north of Whittier, California.
The Trail commemorates the 1775–1776 land route that Spanish commander Juan Bautista de Anza took from the Sonora y Sinaloa Province of New Spain in Colonial Mexico through to Las Californias Province.

San Jose, California

San JoseSan Jose, CASan José
While returning to Monterey, he located the original sites for Mission Santa Clara de Asis and the town of San José de Guadalupe (modern day San Jose, California), but again did not establish either settlement. The de Anza and De Anza spellings are also the namesake of streets, schools, and buildings in his honor including: De Anza Boulevards in San Mateo and Cupertino, De Anza Park in Sunnyvale, De Anza College in Cupertino, De Anza High School in Richmond, Juan De Anza K-5 in the Wiseburn Elementary School District of Hawthorne, De Anza Middle School in Ontario, De Anza Middle School in Ventura, De Anza Elementary School in El Centro, and the De Anza School in Baldwin Park, the landmark De Anza Hotel in San Jose, and the historic De Anza Hotel in Calexico—all in California.
That year, King Carlos III of Spain approved an expedition by Juan Bautista de Anza to survey the San Francisco Bay Area, in order to choose the sites for two future settlements and their accompanying mission.

Quechan

YumaYumanYuma Indians
This was in the domain of the Yuma tribe, with which he established good relations.
The first significant contact of the Quechan with Europeans was with the Spanish explorer Juan Bautista de Anza and his party in the winter of 1774.

Pedro Font

Padre Pedro Font
Having fulfilled his mission from the Viceroy, he continued on with Father Pedro Font and a party of twelve others exploring north and found an inland route to the San Francisco Bay described by Portolà.
He was the chaplain of Juan Bautista de Anza's expedition that explored Alta California from 1775 to 1776.

Arizpe

Arizpe, Sonora
Juan Bautista de Anza Bezerra Nieto was born in Fronteras, New Navarre, New Spain (today Sonora, Mexico) in 1736 (near Arizpe), most probably at Cuquiarachi, Sonora, but possibly at the Presidio of Fronteras.
In 1775 an overland expedition, led by Captain Juan Bautista de Anza, of colonial soldiers, missionaries, and settlers was approved by the King of Spain, for a more direct land route to and further colonization of Spanish Alta California.

Taos, New Mexico

TaosTaos, NMDon Fernando de Taos
Governor Anza led a punitive expedition against the Comanche group of Native Americans, who had been repeatedly raiding Taos during 1779.
Juan Bautista de Anza, governor of the Province of New Mexico, led a successful punitive expedition in 1779 against the Comanches.

Stevens Creek (California)

Stevens CreekStevens Creek Trail
In Anza's diary on March 25, 1776, he states that he "arrived at the arroyo of San Joseph Cupertino (now Stevens Creek), which is useful only for travelers. Here we halted for the night, having come eight leagues in seven and a half hours. From this place we have seen at our right the estuary which runs from the port of San Francisco."
The creek was originally named Arroyo San José de Cupertino (Spanish for Saint Joseph of Cupertino Creek) by Spanish explorer Juan Bautista de Anza, who camped along the creek on his expedition from Monterey to San Francisco.

Tubac Presidio State Historic Park

El Presidio Reál San Ignacio de TubacTubac PresidioFort Tubac
This was approved by the King of Spain and on January 8, 1774, with 3 padres, 20 soldiers, 11 servants, 35 mules, 65 cattle, and 140 horses, Anza set forth from Tubac Presidio, south of present-day Tucson, Arizona.
Threatened by the establishment of a Russian fort immediately north of the San Francisco Bay area, the Spanish sent Juan Bautista de Anza to establish an overland route to and a presidio and mission in the San Francisco area.

José Joaquín Moraga

Jose Joaquin MoragaJosé Joaquin MoragaMoraga
He did not establish the settlement; it was established later by José Joaquín Moraga.
Moraga was second in command to Juan Bautista de Anza in the 1776 overland colonizing expedition from the region of Alta California which would become part of southern Arizona and northern Mexico, to what is now San Francisco, California.

Anza-Borrego Desert State Park

Anza Borrego Desert State ParkAnza-Borrego State ParkAnza-Borrego Desert
Also named for Anza is Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, located mostly in eastern San Diego County, California.
The park takes its name from 18th century Spanish explorer Juan Bautista de Anza and borrego, a Spanish word for sheep.

Juan Bautista de Anza I

Juan Bautista de Anssa
He was the son of Juan Bautista de Anza I.
It would be left to the next generation of soldiers and his own son, Juan Bautista de Anza, of the same name to discover the route between Sonora and California.

Presidio of San Francisco

PresidioSan Francisco PresidioThe Presidio
Pressing on, Anza located the sites for the Presidio of San Francisco and Mission San Francisco de Asis in present-day San Francisco, California on March 28, 1776.
The Presidio was originally a Spanish fort sited by Juan Bautista de Anza on March 28, 1776, built by a party led by José Joaquín Moraga later that year.

Comanchero

Commancheros
This paved the way for traders and the development of the Comanchero trade.
This continued until 1779, when a 500-man army led directly by the new young governor, Juan Bautista de Anza, and including 200 native auxiliaries, undertook a punitive expedition against the largest and most active group of Comanche raiders, who were led by a man known as Green Horn (Cuerno Verde), and, surprising the Comanches in their camp, killed Green Horn and dealt a severe defeat to the Comanches.

Portolá expedition

Portola expeditionPortolà expeditionexpedition
The Spanish began colonizing Alta California with the Portolá expedition of 1769-1770.
It is also important in that it, along with the later de Anza expedition, established the overland route north to San Francisco which became the Camino Real.

San Juan Bautista, California

San Juan BautistaSan JuanSan Juan Bautista,
A building named the Juan de Anza House in San Juan Bautista, California is a National Historic Landmark.
The Juan Bautista de Anza House, the General José Castro house, and the San Juan Bautista Plaza Historic District are National Historic Landmarks.

Ontario, California

OntarioOntario, CAOntario, California, USA
The "Juan Bautista de Anza Community Park" is in Calabasas, California, and "De Anza Park" is in Ontario. The de Anza and De Anza spellings are also the namesake of streets, schools, and buildings in his honor including: De Anza Boulevards in San Mateo and Cupertino, De Anza Park in Sunnyvale, De Anza College in Cupertino, De Anza High School in Richmond, Juan De Anza K-5 in the Wiseburn Elementary School District of Hawthorne, De Anza Middle School in Ontario, De Anza Middle School in Ventura, De Anza Elementary School in El Centro, and the De Anza School in Baldwin Park, the landmark De Anza Hotel in San Jose, and the historic De Anza Hotel in Calexico—all in California.
Juan Bautista de Anza is said to have passed through the area on his 1774 expedition, and to this day a city park and a middle school bear his name.

Cupertino, California

CupertinoCupertino, CACalifornia
The de Anza and De Anza spellings are also the namesake of streets, schools, and buildings in his honor including: De Anza Boulevards in San Mateo and Cupertino, De Anza Park in Sunnyvale, De Anza College in Cupertino, De Anza High School in Richmond, Juan De Anza K-5 in the Wiseburn Elementary School District of Hawthorne, De Anza Middle School in Ontario, De Anza Middle School in Ventura, De Anza Elementary School in El Centro, and the De Anza School in Baldwin Park, the landmark De Anza Hotel in San Jose, and the historic De Anza Hotel in Calexico—all in California.
The creek had been named by Spanish explorer Juan Bautista de Anza's cartographer, who named it after Saint Joseph of Cupertino.

San Francisco

San Francisco, CaliforniaSan Francisco, CACity and County of San Francisco
Pressing on, Anza located the sites for the Presidio of San Francisco and Mission San Francisco de Asis in present-day San Francisco, California on March 28, 1776. A more direct land route and further colonization were desired, especially at present-day San Francisco, which Portolá saw but was not able to colonize.
Seven years later, on March 28, 1776, the Spanish established the Presidio of San Francisco, followed by a mission, Mission San Francisco de Asís (Mission Dolores), established by the Spanish explorer Juan Bautista de Anza.

Cuerno Verde

Battle of Cuerno Verde
Chief Cuerno Verde, for whom Greenhorn Creek is named, and many other leaders of the Comanche were killed.
The Viceroy offered Juan Bautista de Anza the governorship of Nuevo Mexico in exchange for him dealing with Tavibo Naritgant.

De Anza College

Flint CenterDeAnza CollegeDe Anza
The de Anza and De Anza spellings are also the namesake of streets, schools, and buildings in his honor including: De Anza Boulevards in San Mateo and Cupertino, De Anza Park in Sunnyvale, De Anza College in Cupertino, De Anza High School in Richmond, Juan De Anza K-5 in the Wiseburn Elementary School District of Hawthorne, De Anza Middle School in Ontario, De Anza Middle School in Ventura, De Anza Elementary School in El Centro, and the De Anza School in Baldwin Park, the landmark De Anza Hotel in San Jose, and the historic De Anza Hotel in Calexico—all in California.
The college is named after the Spanish explorer Juan Bautista de Anza.

Borrego Springs, California

Borrego SpringsBorrego Springs, CABorrego Valley
The de Anza Country Club and its 18-hole championship Golf course is located within the village of Borrego Springs, California, which is entirely surrounded by the park.
The name of Anza-Borrego State Park is derived from a combination of Juan Bautista de Anza and "borrego" which is Spanish for lamb, in honor of the local herds of bighorn sheep.

San Gabriel Valley

San GabrielValleyEast San Gabriel Valley
The primary legacy is the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail in California and Arizona, administered by the US National Park Service, for hiking and driving the route of his expedition exploring Las Californias In the San Fernando Valley the trail crosses the Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve, and in the San Gabriel Valley the trail is in the Puente Hills just north of Whittier, California.