Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail

Anza Trailtrailde Anza TrailJuan Bautista de AnzaJuan De Anza Trailtwo expeditions
The Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail is a 1210 mi National Park Service unit in the United States National Historic Trail and National Millennium Trail programs.wikipedia
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National Millennium Trail

White House Millennium Trail Council
The Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail is a 1210 mi National Park Service unit in the United States National Historic Trail and National Millennium Trail programs.

Nogales, Arizona

NogalesNogales, AZNogales (Arizona, USA)
The trail route extends from Nogales on the U.S.-Mexico border in Arizona, through the California desert and coastal areas in Southern California and the Central Coast region to San Francisco.
Nogales was at the beginning of the 1775–1776 Juan Bautista de Anza Expedition as it entered the present day U.S. from New Spain, and the town is now on the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail.

National Trails System

National Scenic TrailNational Historic TrailNational Trails System Act
The Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail is a 1210 mi National Park Service unit in the United States National Historic Trail and National Millennium Trail programs.
They represent the earliest travels across the continent on the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail; the nation's struggle for independence on the Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail; epic migrations on the Mormon & Oregon Trails and the development of continental commerce on the Santa Fe Trail.

Juan Bautista de Anza

De Anza ExpeditionAnza Expeditionde Anza
The Trail commemorates the 1775–1776 land route that Spanish commander Juan Bautista de Anza took from the Sonora y Sinaloa Province of New Spain in Colonial Mexico through to Las Californias Province. Juan Bautista de Anza leading an exploratory expedition on January 8, 1774, with 3 padres, 20 soldiers, 11 servants, 35 mules, 65 cattle, and 140 horses set forth from Tubac Presidio, south of present-day Tucson, Arizona.
Today this route is marked as the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail.

Mission San Pedro y San Pablo de Bicuñer

San Pedro y San Pablo de Bicuñer
In 1780 the Spanish established two combination missions and pueblos at the Yuma Colorado River Crossing of the Anza trail: Mission San Pedro y San Pablo de Bicuñer and Mission Puerto de Purísima Concepción.
Mission San Pedro y San Pablo de Bicuñer was founded on January 7, 1781 by Spanish Padre Francisco Garcés, to protect the Anza Trail where it forded the Colorado River, between colonial Mexico and Alta California.

Yuma Crossing

Yuma Crossing National Heritage AreaYuma Crossing and Associated Sites
They went across the Sonoran desert to California from Mexico by swinging south of the Gila River to avoid Apache attacks until they hit the Colorado River at the Yuma Crossing—about the only way across the Colorado River.
The Yuma Crossing is one of the designated tour sights of the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail, a National Park Service unit in the United States National Historic Trail and National Millennium Trail programs.

California Coastal Trail

coastal trail
The paths the expeditions took are now commemorated in the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail.

National Park Service

U.S. National Park ServiceNational Park SystemUnited States National Park Service
The Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail is a 1210 mi National Park Service unit in the United States National Historic Trail and National Millennium Trail programs.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
The Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail is a 1210 mi National Park Service unit in the United States National Historic Trail and National Millennium Trail programs.

Mexico–United States border

U.S.-Mexico borderMexican borderUnited States–Mexico border
The trail route extends from Nogales on the U.S.-Mexico border in Arizona, through the California desert and coastal areas in Southern California and the Central Coast region to San Francisco.

Arizona

AZState of ArizonaArizona, U.S.
The trail route extends from Nogales on the U.S.-Mexico border in Arizona, through the California desert and coastal areas in Southern California and the Central Coast region to San Francisco.

Southern California

southernSoCalCalifornia
The trail route extends from Nogales on the U.S.-Mexico border in Arizona, through the California desert and coastal areas in Southern California and the Central Coast region to San Francisco.

Central Coast (California)

Central CoastCentral Coast of CaliforniaCalifornia Central Coast
The trail route extends from Nogales on the U.S.-Mexico border in Arizona, through the California desert and coastal areas in Southern California and the Central Coast region to San Francisco.

San Francisco

San Francisco, CaliforniaSan Francisco, CACity and County of San Francisco
The trail route extends from Nogales on the U.S.-Mexico border in Arizona, through the California desert and coastal areas in Southern California and the Central Coast region to San Francisco.

Spain

SpanishESPKingdom of Spain
The Trail commemorates the 1775–1776 land route that Spanish commander Juan Bautista de Anza took from the Sonora y Sinaloa Province of New Spain in Colonial Mexico through to Las Californias Province.

Estado de Occidente

Sonora y SinaloaSonora and SinaloaOccidente State
The Trail commemorates the 1775–1776 land route that Spanish commander Juan Bautista de Anza took from the Sonora y Sinaloa Province of New Spain in Colonial Mexico through to Las Californias Province.

New Spain

Viceroyalty of New SpainSpanishNueva España
The Trail commemorates the 1775–1776 land route that Spanish commander Juan Bautista de Anza took from the Sonora y Sinaloa Province of New Spain in Colonial Mexico through to Las Californias Province.

The Californias

Las CaliforniasLas Californias ProvinceCalifornia
The Trail commemorates the 1775–1776 land route that Spanish commander Juan Bautista de Anza took from the Sonora y Sinaloa Province of New Spain in Colonial Mexico through to Las Californias Province.

San Francisco Bay Area

Bay AreaSan FranciscoBay Area, California
The goal of the 1775–1776 trip was to establish a mission and presidio on the San Francisco Bay.

Quechan

YumaYumanYuma Indians
It was used for about five years before being closed by the Quechan (Yuma) Indians in 1781 and kept closed for the next 40 years.

Presidio San Ignacio de Tubac

presidioEl Presidio Real de San Ignacio de TúbacFort Tubac
Juan Bautista de Anza leading an exploratory expedition on January 8, 1774, with 3 padres, 20 soldiers, 11 servants, 35 mules, 65 cattle, and 140 horses set forth from Tubac Presidio, south of present-day Tucson, Arizona.

Tucson, Arizona

TucsonTucson, AZTucson, Arizona Territory
Juan Bautista de Anza leading an exploratory expedition on January 8, 1774, with 3 padres, 20 soldiers, 11 servants, 35 mules, 65 cattle, and 140 horses set forth from Tubac Presidio, south of present-day Tucson, Arizona.

Gila River

GilaGila ValleyGila Basin
They went across the Sonoran desert to California from Mexico by swinging south of the Gila River to avoid Apache attacks until they hit the Colorado River at the Yuma Crossing—about the only way across the Colorado River.

Apache

ApachesApache IndiansApachean
They went across the Sonoran desert to California from Mexico by swinging south of the Gila River to avoid Apache attacks until they hit the Colorado River at the Yuma Crossing—about the only way across the Colorado River.