A report on Juan Fernández Islands

Landsat 7 image of the Juan Fernández Islands on 15 September 1999, shows the unique pattern of clouds known as "Kármán vortex street" caused by the interaction of winds with the islands' mountains
Robinson Crusoe Island, as seen in the late 19th or early 20th century. The ship in Cumberland Bay is the cruiser Esmeralda.
in March 1915, shortly before its scuttling in Cumberland Bay
Map of Robinson Crusoe Island (including Santa Clara Island)
Map of Alejandro Selkirk Island
Map of both islands
Satellite images of Juan Fernández Islands (Alejandro Selkirk Island, inset left)
overview map

The Juan Fernández Islands (Archipiélago Juan Fernández) are a sparsely inhabited island group in the South Pacific Ocean reliant on tourism and fishing.

- Juan Fernández Islands
Landsat 7 image of the Juan Fernández Islands on 15 September 1999, shows the unique pattern of clouds known as "Kármán vortex street" caused by the interaction of winds with the islands' mountains

46 related topics with Alpha

Overall

April 2005 view of the town of San Juan Bautista, on the north coast at Cumberland Bay

Robinson Crusoe Island

11 links

April 2005 view of the town of San Juan Bautista, on the north coast at Cumberland Bay
, just prior to its scuttling in Cumberland Bay
A fisherman with two spiny lobsters off Robinson Crusoe Island
Robinson Crusoe Island bayside view of the town of San Juan Bautista
Robinson Crusoe Island statue of Robinson Crusoe in the town of San Juan Bautista
Robinson Crusoe Island Dendroseris litoralis – Juan Fernández cabbage tree

Robinson Crusoe Island (Isla Róbinson Crusoe, ), formerly known as Más a Tierra, is the second largest of the Juan Fernández Islands, situated 670 km (362 nmi; 416 mi) west of San Antonio, Chile, in the South Pacific Ocean.

Chile

5 links

Country in the western part of South America.

Country in the western part of South America.

Lautaro, toqui and hero of the Arauco war
Pedro de Valdivia, conqueror of Chile
Bernardo O'Higgins, Libertador and the Supreme Director of Chile
The Battle of Iquique on 21 May 1879. The victory of Chile in the War of the Pacific allowed its expansion into new territories.
Chile's Almirante Latorre dreadnought in 1921
Salvador Allende
Fighter jets bombing the Presidential Palace of La Moneda during the Chilean coup of 1973
Augusto Pinochet
Five presidents of Chile since Transition to democracy (1990–2022), celebrating the Bicentennial of Chile
The Palacio de La Moneda in downtown Santiago
The Palace of Justice in Santiago
Chile's territorial gains after the War of the Pacific in 1879–83
Karel Doorman-class frigate
F-16 Fighting Falcon
Chile map of Köppen climate classification.
Araucaria araucana trees in Conguillío National Park.
Andean condor (Vultur gryphus), the national bird of Chile.
Topographic map of Chile. To view maps based on SRTM topographic relief of the country, see here.
Osorno Volcano and the Petrohué River
Nef Glacier and the Plomo Lake
General Carrera lake, the largest in the country.
Population of Chile from 1820, projected up to 2050
Mapuche women of Tirúa
Chileans with flags of Chile
Chilean students in Santiago de Chile
German immigrants in southern Chile
Neoclassical Santiago Metropolitan Cathedral
Pontifical Catholic University of Chile (PUC).
FONASA is the funding branch of the Ministry of Health.
A proportional representation of Chile exports, 2019
Chilean (blue) and average Latin American (orange) GDP per capita (1980–2017)
The financial district in Santiago de Chile
Santiago Stock Exchange
Chuquicamata, the largest open pit copper mine in the world
Vineyard in the Casablanca Valley
Elqui Valley, wine and pisco region
Valparaíso
Puerto Varas
The Santiago Metro is South America's most extensive metro system
Torre Entel in Santiago de Chile, with the Andes mountains in the background
La Zamacueca, by Manuel Antonio Caro.
Chilean asado (barbecue) and marraqueta
Estadio Nacional Julio Martínez Prádanos
The Chilean national polo team with President Michelle Bachelet and the trophy of the 2015 World Polo Championship.
State of Chile's international relations in the world:
Chile
Country with diplomatic relations and Chilean embassy in the country.
Country with diplomatic relations and an embassy in Chile, but no Chilean embassy.
Country with diplomatic relations but without ambassadors.
Country with no diplomatic relations currently.

Chile also controls the Pacific islands of Juan Fernández, Isla Salas y Gómez, Desventuradas, and Easter Island in Oceania.

A view of Alejandro Selkirk Island

Alejandro Selkirk Island

5 links

A view of Alejandro Selkirk Island
The Masafuera rayadito is endemic to Alejandro Selkirk
The extinct Alejandro Selkirk firecrown, Sephanoides fernandensis leyboldi

Alejandro Selkirk Island (Isla Alejandro Selkirk), previously known as Más Afuera (Farther Out (to Sea)) and renamed after the marooned sailor Alexander Selkirk, is the largest and most westerly island in the Juan Fernández Archipelago of the Valparaíso Region of Chile.

Easter Island

5 links

Island and special territory of Chile in the southeastern Pacific Ocean, at the southeasternmost point of the Polynesian Triangle in Oceania.

Island and special territory of Chile in the southeastern Pacific Ocean, at the southeasternmost point of the Polynesian Triangle in Oceania.

Traditional cultivars of sweet potato (kumara) were staple crops on Polynesian Rapa Nui
Moai at Rano Raraku, Easter Island
A View of the Monuments of Easter Island, Rapanui, c. undefined 1775–1776 by William Hodges.
Rapa Nui people, painted by Louis Choris, 1816
Motu Nui islet, part of the Birdman Cult ceremony
Jacob Roggeveen analyzing a Moai statue, 18th-century engraving.
La Pérouse at Easter Island in 1786
"Queen Mother" Koreto with her daughters "Queen" Caroline and Harriette in 1877
General Pinochet posing with a young Rapa Nui woman
Manu Piri symbolizes love and union between two people. The slogan of the current administration is "Rapa Nui hai mahatu", translated as "Rapa Nui with love".
Souvenir Moai from Rapa Nui, bought at the Artisan's Market, 2020
Easter Island, Isla Salas y Gómez, South America and the islands in between
Detailed map of Rapa Nui/Easter Island
Typical landscape on Easter Island; rounded extinct volcanoes covered in low vegetation.
Bird paintings in the cave called "Cave of the Men Eaters"
Two ahu at Hanga Roa. In foreground Ahu Ko Te Riku (with a pukao on its head). In the mid-ground is a side view of an ahu with five moai showing retaining wall, platform, ramp and pavement. The Mataveri end of Hanga Roa is visible in the background with Rano Kau rising above it.
A Hare Moa, a Chicken House, image cut from a laser scan collected by nonprofit CyArk.
Sample of rongorongo
Ancestor figure, circa 1830, from LACMA collections
Satellite view of Easter Island 2019. The Poike peninsula is on the right.
Digital recreation of its ancient landscape, with tropical forest and palm trees
Hanga Roa seen from Terevaka, the highest point of the island
View of Rano Kau and Pacific Ocean
Tukuturi, an unusual bearded kneeling moai
All fifteen standing moai at Ahu Tongariki, excavated and restored in the 1990s
Ahu Akivi, one of the few inland ahu, with the only moai facing the ocean
Makemake with two birdmen, carved from red scoria
Fish petroglyph found near Ahu Tongariki
Polynesian dancing with feather costumes is on the tourist itinerary.
Hanga Roa town hall
Fishing boats
Front view of the Catholic Church, Hanga Roa
Catholic Church, Hanga Roa
Interior view of the Catholic Church in Hanga Roa

On 30 July 2007, a constitutional reform gave Easter Island and the Juan Fernández Islands (also known as Robinson Crusoe Island) the status of "special territories" of Chile.

Clad in goatskins, Selkirk awaits rescue in a sculpture by Thomas Stuart Burnett (1885)

Alexander Selkirk

4 links

Scottish privateer and Royal Navy officer who spent four years and four months as a castaway (1704–1709) after being marooned by his captain, initially at his request, on an uninhabited island in the South Pacific Ocean.

Scottish privateer and Royal Navy officer who spent four years and four months as a castaway (1704–1709) after being marooned by his captain, initially at his request, on an uninhabited island in the South Pacific Ocean.

Clad in goatskins, Selkirk awaits rescue in a sculpture by Thomas Stuart Burnett (1885)
Map of Robinson Crusoe island (formerly Más a Tierra island), where Selkirk lived as a castaway
Selkirk reading his Bible in one of two huts he built on a mountainside
The rescued Selkirk, seated at right, being taken aboard Duke.
An illustration of Crusoe in goatskin clothing shows the influence of Selkirk
Title page from The Life and Adventures of Alexander Selkirk, the Real Robinson Crusoe (1835), by an unknown author
Plaque for Selkirk in Lower Largo, Scotland, which reads: "In memory of Alexander Selkirk, mariner, the original of Robinson Crusoe who lived on the island of Juan Fernández in complete solitude for four years and four months. He died 1723 [sic], lieutenant of HMS Weymouth, aged 47 years. This statue is erected by David Gillies, net manufacturer, on the site of the cottage in which Selkirk was born."

Stradling's ship stopped to resupply at the uninhabited Juan Fernández Islands, west of South America, and Selkirk judged correctly that the craft was unseaworthy and asked to be left there.

Title page from the first edition

Robinson Crusoe

3 links

Novel by Daniel Defoe, first published on 25 April 1719.

Novel by Daniel Defoe, first published on 25 April 1719.

Title page from the first edition
Pictorial map of Crusoe's island, the "Island of Despair", showing incidents from the book
The route taken by Robinson Crusoe over the Pyrenees mountains in chapters 19 & 20 of Defoe's novel, as envisaged by Joseph Ribas
Statue of Robinson Crusoe at Alexander Selkirk's birthplace of Lower Largo by Thomas Stuart Burnett
Book on Alexander Selkirk
Plaque in Queen's Gardens, Hull, showing him on his island
Crusoe standing over Friday after he frees him from the cannibals
Robinson Crusoe bookstore on İstiklal Avenue, Istanbul

Most famously, Defoe's suspected inspiration for Robinson Crusoe is thought to be Scottish sailor Alexander Selkirk, who spent four years on the uninhabited island of Más a Tierra (renamed Robinson Crusoe Island in 1966) in the Juan Fernández Islands off the Chilean coast.

Desventuradas Islands

3 links

Group of four small oceanic islands located 850 km off the coast of Chile, northwest of Santiago in the Pacific Ocean.

Group of four small oceanic islands located 850 km off the coast of Chile, northwest of Santiago in the Pacific Ocean.

No signs of prehistoric human activity by Polynesians or Indigenous peoples of the Americas have ever been found on the islands, or on the neighboring Juan Fernández Islands.

Oceania

2 links

Geographical region that includes Australasia, Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia.

Geographical region that includes Australasia, Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia.

Ethnocultural subregions of Oceania.
A German map of Oceania from 1884, showing the region to encompass Australia and all islands between Asia and Latin America.
A map of member states for the Pacific Islands Forum (PIF), the member states are depicted in blue. The PIF is a governing organization for the Pacific, and all of its members are politically within Oceania. Territories geographically associated with Oceania, but not politically associated with Oceania, such as Easter Island, Hawaii and Western New Guinea, have considered gaining representation in the PIF.
An exclusive economic zone map of the Pacific which includes territories not politically associated with Oceania, that may be considered geographically or geologically within Oceania.
A 19th-century engraving of an Aboriginal Australian encampment
Stone money transport to Yap Island in Micronesia (1880)
Chronological dispersal of Austronesian people across the Pacific (per Bellwood in Chambers, 2008)
Moai at Ahu Tongariki on Rapa Nui (Easter Island)
1852 map of Oceania by J. G. Barbié du Bocage. Includes regions of Polynesia, Micronesia, Melanesia and Malesia.
New Guinea from 1884 to 1919. The Netherlands controlled the western half of New Guinea, Germany the north-eastern part, and Britain the south-eastern part.
New Zealand troops land on Vella Lavella, in Solomon Islands.
Aoraki / Mount Cook, located on the South Island of New Zealand
Puncak Jaya / Carstensz Pyramid, highest summit in Oceania
A map of Oceania from the CIA World Factbook
Exclusive economic zones of Pacific states and territories
The Pacific Plate comprises most of Oceania, excluding Australasia and the western portion of Melanesia.
New Zealand countryside
Uluru (Ayers Rock) in Central Australia
The Pacific robin inhabits the islands of the south western Pacific.
August 2011 winter's snowfall in Dunedin, Otago
Saione, the church of the King, a Free Wesleyan Church in Kolomotuʻa, Tonga. Especially British and American missionaries brought various Protestant denominations to Oceania.
Many Portuguese immigrants in Hawaii were Azorean or Madeiran.
The skyline of Sydney
Auckland's central business district at night.
Honolulu viewed from Diamond Head crater
Shangri-La's Fijian Resort
Dandenong Ranges in Victoria are popular among tourists.
Elizabeth is Head of the Commonwealth and Queen of five Oceanian countries: Australia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Tuvalu.
Government building in the Samoan capital Apia housing administrative ministerial offices.
On 28 June 2007, the Sydney Opera House became a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
The Iolani Palace in Honolulu, formerly the residence of the Hawaiian monarch, was restored and opened to the public as a museum in 1978.
The Hobbiton Movie Set, located near Matamata, was used for The Lord of the Rings film trilogy.
A fale on Manono Island
Gwion Gwion rock paintings found in the north-west Kimberley region of Western Australia
Fiji playing Wales at seven-a-side rugby

Islands at the geographic extremes of Oceania are generally considered to be the Bonin Islands, a politically integral part of Japan; Hawaii, a state of the United States; Clipperton Island, a possession of France; the Juan Fernández Islands, belonging to Chile; and Macquarie Island, belonging to Australia.

Santa Clara Island

1 links

Santa Clara Island (Isla Santa Clara) is a tiny, uninhabited island in the Pacific Ocean, off the coast of Robinson Crusoe Island in a group of islands known as the Juan Fernández Islands.

San Juan Bautista, Chile

1 links

Mapa de la isla de San Juan Bautista

San Juan Bautista is the main town in the Juan Fernández Islands of Chile.