Judeo-Christian ethics

Judeo-Christian valuesJudeo-ChristianJudeo-Christian ethicJudeo-Christian heritage
The idea that a common Judeo-Christian ethics or Judeo-Christian values underpins American politics, law and morals has been part of the "American civil religion" since the 1940s.wikipedia
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Conservatism in the United States

conservativeconservativesConservatism
In recent years, the phrase has been associated with political conservatives, but the concept—though not always the exact phrase—has frequently featured in the rhetoric of leaders across the political spectrum, including that of Franklin D. Roosevelt and Lyndon B. Johnson.
American conservatism is a broad system of political beliefs in the United States that is characterized by respect for American traditions, republicanism, support for Judeo-Christian values, moral universalism, free markets and free trade, anti-communism, individualism, advocacy of American exceptionalism, and a defense of Western culture from the perceived threats posed by socialism, authoritarianism, and moral relativism.

Lyndon B. Johnson

Lyndon JohnsonJohnsonPresident Johnson
In recent years, the phrase has been associated with political conservatives, but the concept—though not always the exact phrase—has frequently featured in the rhetoric of leaders across the political spectrum, including that of Franklin D. Roosevelt and Lyndon B. Johnson.
Biographer Randall B. Woods has argued that Johnson effectively used appeals to Judeo-Christian ethics to garner support for the civil rights law.

American civil religion

civil religion
The idea that a common Judeo-Christian ethics or Judeo-Christian values underpins American politics, law and morals has been part of the "American civil religion" since the 1940s.
Judeo-Christian ethics

Franklin D. Roosevelt

RooseveltFranklin RooseveltPresident Roosevelt
In recent years, the phrase has been associated with political conservatives, but the concept—though not always the exact phrase—has frequently featured in the rhetoric of leaders across the political spectrum, including that of Franklin D. Roosevelt and Lyndon B. Johnson.

George Orwell

OrwellOrwellianOrwell, George
The current American use of "Judeo-Christian" — to refer to a value system common to Jews and Christians — first appeared in print in a book review by the English writer George Orwell in 1939, with the phrase "the Judaeo-Christian scheme of morals."

National Conference for Community and Justice

National Conference of Christians and JewsAmerican National Conference of Christians and JewsBrotherhood Week
Orwell's usage of the term followed at least a decade of efforts by Jewish and Christian leaders, through such groups as the National Conference of Christians and Jews (founded in 1927), to emphasize common ground.

Antisemitism

anti-Semitismanti-Semiticantisemitic
In part, it was a way of countering antisemitism with the idea that the foundation of morals and law in the United States was a shared one between Jews and Christians.

Laissez-faire

laissez fairelaissez-faire capitalismfree-market capitalism
He saw the achievement of social justice through government action as morally superior to the old laissez-faire approach.

Dwight D. Eisenhower

EisenhowerDwight EisenhowerPresident Eisenhower
In December 1952 President Dwight Eisenhower, speaking extemporaneously a month before his inauguration, said, in what may be the first direct public reference by a U.S.

And I don't care what it is

[The Founding Fathers said] 'we hold that all men are endowed by their Creator ... ' In other words, our form of government has no sense unless it is founded in a deeply felt religious faith, and I don't care what it is.

Barry Goldwater

GoldwaterBarry M. GoldwaterBarry
Senator Barry Goldwater noted that conservatives "believed the communist projection of man as a producing, consuming animal to be used and discarded was antithetical to all the Judeo-Christian understandings which are the foundations upon which the Republic stands."

Third World

third-worldthird world countriesdeveloping world
Belief in the superiority of Western Judeo-Christian traditions led conservatives to downplay the aspirations of the Third World to free themselves from colonial rule.

Christian right

religious rightconservative ChristianChristian conservative
The emergence of the "Christian right" as a political force and part of the conservative coalition dates from the 1970s.

Ronald Reagan

ReaganPresident ReaganPresident Ronald Reagan
President Ronald Reagan frequently emphasized Judeo-Christian values as necessary ingredients in the fight against Communism.

Tom Freiling

Tom Freiling, a Christian publisher and head of a conservative PAC, stated in his 2003 book, Reagan's God and Country, that "Reagan's core religious beliefs were always steeped in traditional Judeo-Christian heritage."

Bill Clinton

ClintonPresident ClintonPresident Bill Clinton
President Bill Clinton during his 1992 presidential campaign, likewise emphasized the role of religion in society, and in his personal life, having made references to the Judeo-Christian tradition.

Culture war

culture warscultural warAmerican culture wars
The term became especially significant in American politics, and, promoting "Judeo-Christian values" in the so-called culture wars, usage surged in the 1990s.

James Dobson

Dr. James DobsonDobsonDr. Dobson
James Dobson, a prominent evangelical Christian, said the Judeo-Christian tradition includes the right to display numerous historical documents in Kentucky schools, after they were banned by a federal judge in May 2000 because they were "conveying a very specific governmental endorsement of religion".

Islam in the United States

American MuslimMuslimAmerican Muslims
The study finds the term is now most likely to be used by liberals in connection with discussions of Muslim and Islamic inclusion in America, and renewed debate about the separation of church and state.

Separation of church and state

disestablishmentchurch and stateseparation of religion and state
The study finds the term is now most likely to be used by liberals in connection with discussions of Muslim and Islamic inclusion in America, and renewed debate about the separation of church and state.

Multiculturalism

multiculturaldiversitycosmopolitan
It is used more than ever by some Conservative thinkers and journalists, who use it to discuss the Islamic threat to America, the dangers of multiculturalism, and moral decay in a materialist, secular age.

Marsh v. Chambers

MarshMarsh'' case
In the case of Marsh v. Chambers, 463 U.S. 783 (1983), the Supreme Court of the United States held that a state legislature could constitutionally have a paid chaplain to conduct legislative prayers "in the Judeo-Christian tradition."

Supreme Court of the United States

Supreme CourtUnited States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme Court
In the case of Marsh v. Chambers, 463 U.S. 783 (1983), the Supreme Court of the United States held that a state legislature could constitutionally have a paid chaplain to conduct legislative prayers "in the Judeo-Christian tradition."

Chesterfield County, Virginia

Chesterfield CountyChesterfieldChesterfield Co.
In Simpson v. Chesterfield County Board of Supervisors, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals held that the Supreme Court's holding in the Marsh case meant that the "Chesterfield County could constitutionally exclude Cynthia Simpson, a Wiccan priestess, from leading its legislative prayers, because her faith was not 'in the Judeo-Christian tradition.'" Chesterfield County's board included Jewish, Christian, and Muslim clergy in its invited list.

United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit

4th Cir.Fourth CircuitFourth Circuit Court of Appeals
In Simpson v. Chesterfield County Board of Supervisors, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals held that the Supreme Court's holding in the Marsh case meant that the "Chesterfield County could constitutionally exclude Cynthia Simpson, a Wiccan priestess, from leading its legislative prayers, because her faith was not 'in the Judeo-Christian tradition.'" Chesterfield County's board included Jewish, Christian, and Muslim clergy in its invited list.