Judgement of Paris

Judgment of ParisThe Judgement of Pariswhose feudancient Greek mythchosen herjudgedJudgement of the goddessesJuno, Minerva, Venus, Paris and Cupidmythological encounterParis
The Judgement of Paris is a story from Greek mythology, which was one of the events that led up to the Trojan War and (in slightly later versions of the story) to the foundation of Rome.wikipedia
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Epic Cycle

Trojan cycleepic traditionTrojan War cycle
The brief allusion to the Judgement in the Iliad (24.25–30) shows that the episode initiating all the subsequent action was already familiar to its audience; a fuller version was told in the Cypria, a lost work of the Epic Cycle, of which only fragments (and a reliable summary ) remain.

Cypria

KypriaHegesias (or Hegesinus) of SalamisHegesias of Salamis
The brief allusion to the Judgement in the Iliad (24.25–30) shows that the episode initiating all the subsequent action was already familiar to its audience; a fuller version was told in the Cypria, a lost work of the Epic Cycle, of which only fragments (and a reliable summary ) remain.
The Cypria described the wedding of Peleus and Thetis; in the Judgement of Paris among the goddesses Athena, Hera, and Aphrodite: Paris awards the prize for beauty to Aphrodite, and as a prize is awarded Helen, wife of Menelaus.

Athena

Pallas AthenaPallasPallas Athene
Three goddesses claimed the apple: Hera, Athena and Aphrodite.
Along with Aphrodite and Hera, Athena was one of the three goddesses whose feud resulted in the beginning of the Trojan War.

Aphrodite

CyprisVenusAphrodite Urania
Three goddesses claimed the apple: Hera, Athena and Aphrodite.
Along with Athena and Hera, Aphrodite was one of the three goddesses whose feud resulted in the beginning of the Trojan War and she plays a major role throughout the Iliad.

Eris (mythology)

ErisDiscordiaDiscord
However, Eris, goddess of discord was not invited, for it was believed she would have made the party unpleasant for everyone.
The most famous tale of Eris recounts her initiating the Trojan War by causing the Judgement of Paris.

Helen of Troy

HelenHelen of SpartaHelena
This was Helen of Sparta, wife of the Greek king Menelaus.
She was married to King Menelaus of Sparta but was abducted by Prince Paris of Troy after the goddess Aphrodite promised her to him in the Judgement of Paris.

Greek mythology

GreekGreek mythmythological
The Judgement of Paris is a story from Greek mythology, which was one of the events that led up to the Trojan War and (in slightly later versions of the story) to the foundation of Rome.
The Trojan War cycle, a collection of epic poems, starts with the events leading up to the war: Eris and the golden apple of Kallisti, the Judgement of Paris, the abduction of Helen, the sacrifice of Iphigenia at Aulis.

Apple of Discord

Golden Apple of DiscordKallistigolden apple
Angered by this snub, Eris arrived at the celebration with a golden apple from the Garden of the Hesperides, which she threw into the proceedings as a prize of beauty.
An apple of discord is a reference to the Golden Apple of Discord which, according to Greek mythology, the goddess Eris (Gr. Ἔρις, "Strife") tossed in the midst of the feast of the gods at the wedding of Peleus and Thetis as a prize of beauty, thus sparking a vanity-fueled dispute among Hera, Athena, and Aphrodite that eventually led to the Trojan War (for the complete story, see The Judgement of Paris).

Peleus

PêleaPēleusPēleús
It is recounted that Zeus held a banquet in celebration of the marriage of Peleus and Thetis (parents of Achilles).
During the feast, Eris, in revenge for not being invited, produced the Apple of Discord, which started the quarrel that led to the Judgement of Paris and eventually the Trojan War.

The Judgement of Paris (Rubens)

The Judgement of ParisThe Judgment of ParisJudgment of Paris
Rubens painted several compositions of the subject at different points in his career.
The Judgement of Paris refers to any of the several paintings of the Judgement of Paris produced by Peter Paul Rubens, though he did not match the 22 depictions of the subject attributed to Lucas Cranach the Elder.

Thetis

ThetysPeleussea-nymph
It is recounted that Zeus held a banquet in celebration of the marriage of Peleus and Thetis (parents of Achilles).
In most interpretations, the award was made during the Judgement of Paris and eventually occasioned the Trojan War.

Hesperides

Garden of the HesperidesApples of the HesperidesGarden of Hesperides
Angered by this snub, Eris arrived at the celebration with a golden apple from the Garden of the Hesperides, which she threw into the proceedings as a prize of beauty.
In the myth of the Judgement of Paris, it was from the Garden that Eris, Goddess of Discord, obtained the Apple of Discord, which led to the Trojan War.

El Juicio de Paris (Simonet)

El Juicio de ParisJudgment of Paris'' (Simonet)
Later artists who have painted the subject include André Lhote, Enrique Simonet (El Juicio de Paris 1904) and Salvador Dalí.
El Juicio de Paris (The Judgment of Paris in English) is an oil-on-canvas painting of the Greek myth, the Judgement of Paris.

Discordianism

DiscordianDiscordiansSacred Chao
The word Kallisti (Modern Greek) written on a golden apple, has become a principal symbol of Discordianism, a post-modernist religion.
The "original snub" is the Discordian name for the events preceding the judgement of Paris, although more focus is put on the actions of Eris.

Feast of the Gods (art)

Feast of the GodsFeast of the gods'' in art
The feast was interrupted by Eris, goddess of discord, who threw the golden Apple of Discord inscribed "for the most beautiful" into the company, provoking the argument that led to the Judgement of Paris, and ultimately to the Trojan War.

Il pomo d'oro

The story is the basis of an earlier opera, Il pomo d'oro, in a prologue and five acts by the Italian composer Antonio Cesti with a libretto by Francesco Sbarra (1611-1668).
The opera tells the story of the Judgement of Paris.

Helen of Troy (miniseries)

Helen of Troy2003 miniseries sharing its nameHelen of Troy (2003)
The Judgement of Paris is featured in the 2003 TV miniseries Helen of Troy.
Most notably, Helen of Troy features and discusses the intervention of the deities (the film's opening scene shows Hera, Athena and Aphrodite at the Judgment of Paris) as written by Homer.

Rome

Rome, ItalyRomanRoma
The Judgement of Paris is a story from Greek mythology, which was one of the events that led up to the Trojan War and (in slightly later versions of the story) to the foundation of Rome.

Iliad

The IliadIlliadIlias
The brief allusion to the Judgement in the Iliad (24.25–30) shows that the episode initiating all the subsequent action was already familiar to its audience; a fuller version was told in the Cypria, a lost work of the Epic Cycle, of which only fragments (and a reliable summary ) remain.

Lost work

lost lostlost works
The brief allusion to the Judgement in the Iliad (24.25–30) shows that the episode initiating all the subsequent action was already familiar to its audience; a fuller version was told in the Cypria, a lost work of the Epic Cycle, of which only fragments (and a reliable summary ) remain.

Ovid

Publius Ovidius NasoOvidianOvidius
The later writers Ovid (Heroides 16.71ff, 149–152 and 5.35f), Lucian (Dialogues of the Gods 20), Pseudo-Apollodorus (Bibliotheca, E.3.2) and Hyginus (Fabulae 92), retell the story with skeptical, ironic or popularizing agendas.

Lucian

Lucian of SamosataPseudo-LucianLukian
The later writers Ovid (Heroides 16.71ff, 149–152 and 5.35f), Lucian (Dialogues of the Gods 20), Pseudo-Apollodorus (Bibliotheca, E.3.2) and Hyginus (Fabulae 92), retell the story with skeptical, ironic or popularizing agendas.

Bibliotheca (Pseudo-Apollodorus)

Pseudo-ApollodorusBibliothecaApollodorus
The later writers Ovid (Heroides 16.71ff, 149–152 and 5.35f), Lucian (Dialogues of the Gods 20), Pseudo-Apollodorus (Bibliotheca, E.3.2) and Hyginus (Fabulae 92), retell the story with skeptical, ironic or popularizing agendas.

Gaius Julius Hyginus

HyginusFabulaeHyginus, Gaius Julius
The later writers Ovid (Heroides 16.71ff, 149–152 and 5.35f), Lucian (Dialogues of the Gods 20), Pseudo-Apollodorus (Bibliotheca, E.3.2) and Hyginus (Fabulae 92), retell the story with skeptical, ironic or popularizing agendas.

Cypselus

KypselosArieusChest of Cypselus
It appeared wordlessly on the ivory and gold votive chest of the 7th-century BC tyrant Cypselus at Olympia, which was described by Pausanias as showing: