Julian Huxley

Sir Julian HuxleyJulian Sorell HuxleyJulian S. HuxleyJulianHuxleySir Julian Sorell HuxleyDr. Julian HuxleyHuxley, JulianHuxley, Sir Julian SorellJ Huxley
Sir Julian Sorell Huxley (22 June 1887 – 14 February 1975) was a British evolutionary biologist, eugenicist, and internationalist.wikipedia
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Modern synthesis (20th century)

modern synthesismodern evolutionary synthesisevolutionary synthesis
He was a proponent of natural selection, and a leading figure in the mid-twentieth century modern synthesis.
Julian Huxley coined the term in his 1942 book, Evolution: The Modern Synthesis.

Evolutionary biology

evolutionary biologistevolutionary biologistsevolutionary
Sir Julian Sorell Huxley (22 June 1887 – 14 February 1975) was a British evolutionary biologist, eugenicist, and internationalist.
In the 1930s, the discipline of evolutionary biology emerged through what Julian Huxley called the modern synthesis of understanding, from previously unrelated fields of biological research, such as genetics and ecology, systematics and paleontology.

UNESCO

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural OrganizationUnited Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural OrganizationUnited Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
He was secretary of the Zoological Society of London (1935–1942), the first Director of UNESCO, a founding member of the World Wildlife Fund and the first President of the British Humanist Association.
The first General Conference took place from 19 November to 10 December 1946, and elected Dr. Julian Huxley to Director-General.

Huxley family

the HuxleysDavid Bruce HuxleyGervas Huxley
Huxley came from the distinguished Huxley family.
His grandsons include Aldous Huxley (author of Brave New World and The Doors of Perception) and his brother Julian Huxley (an evolutionist, and the first director of UNESCO), and Nobel laureate physiologist Andrew Huxley.

Mary Augusta Ward

Mrs. Humphry WardMary WardMrs Humphrey Ward
Huxley was born on 22 June 1887, at the London house of his aunt, the novelist Mary Augusta Ward, while his father was attending the jubilee celebrations of Queen Victoria.
Her sister Julia married Leonard Huxley, the son of Thomas Huxley, and their sons were Julian and Aldous Huxley.

Aldous Huxley

HuxleyAldousHuxley, Aldous
His brother was the writer Aldous Huxley, and his half-brother a fellow biologist and Nobel laureate, Andrew Huxley; his father was writer and editor Leonard Huxley; and his paternal grandfather was Thomas Henry Huxley, a friend and supporter of Charles Darwin and proponent of evolution.
His brother Julian Huxley and half-brother Andrew Huxley also became outstanding biologists.

Selsdon Wood

Selsdon Wood Nature Reserve
There is a public house named after Sir Julian in Selsdon, London Borough of Croydon, close to the Selsdon Wood Nature Reserve which he helped establish.
Sir Julian Huxley (a zoological scientist) was one of the main backers of the Selsdon Wood Nature Reserve.

Galton Institute

Eugenics SocietyEugenics Education SocietyBritish Eugenics Society
Huxley was a prominent member of the British Eugenics Society and was its president from 1959 to 1962.
During this time period members of the Society such as Julian Huxley expressed support for eutelegenesis, a eugenic proposal to artificially inseminate women with the sperm of men deemed mentally and physically superior in an effort to better the race.

Andrew Huxley

Andrew Fielding HuxleySir Andrew HuxleyHuxley
His brother was the writer Aldous Huxley, and his half-brother a fellow biologist and Nobel laureate, Andrew Huxley; his father was writer and editor Leonard Huxley; and his paternal grandfather was Thomas Henry Huxley, a friend and supporter of Charles Darwin and proponent of evolution.
He was the youngest son of the writer and editor Leonard Huxley by Leonard Huxley's second wife Rosalind Bruce, and hence half-brother of the writer Aldous Huxley and fellow biologist Julian Huxley, and grandson of the biologist T. H. Huxley.

Darwin–Wallace Medal

Darwin-Wallace MedalDarwin-Wallace Award
He was awarded UNESCO's Kalinga Prize for the popularisation of science in 1953, the Darwin Medal of the Royal Society in 1956, and the Darwin–Wallace Medal of the Linnaean Society in 1958.

Tom Arnold (literary scholar)

Tom ArnoldThomas ArnoldThomas Arnold the Younger
His maternal grandfather was the academic Tom Arnold, his great-uncle was poet Matthew Arnold and his great-grandfather was Thomas Arnold of Rugby School.
They had nine children (four of whom died young), among them: Ethel, who was a suffragist and child model; Mary, who became a novelist under the name Mrs Humphry Ward; Julia, who married Leonard Huxley, the son of Thomas, and gave birth to Julian and Aldous; and William Thomas the journalist.

Humanists UK

British Humanist AssociationVoltaire LectureBHA
He was secretary of the Zoological Society of London (1935–1942), the first Director of UNESCO, a founding member of the World Wildlife Fund and the first President of the British Humanist Association.
Earlier awardees include A.J. Ayer, Leo Igwe, Polly Toynbee, and Julian Huxley.

Darwin Medal

Royal Society Darwin Medal
He was awarded UNESCO's Kalinga Prize for the popularisation of science in 1953, the Darwin Medal of the Royal Society in 1956, and the Darwin–Wallace Medal of the Linnaean Society in 1958.

Ethology

ethologistanimal behavioranimal behaviour
His 1914 paper on the great crested grebe, later published as a book, was a landmark in avian ethology; his invention of vivid labels for the rituals (such as 'penguin dance', 'plesiosaurus race' etc.) made the ideas memorable and interesting to the general reader.
Other early ethologists, such as Charles O. Whitman, Oskar Heinroth, Wallace Craig and Julian Huxley, instead concentrated on behaviours that can be called instinctive, or natural, in that they occur in all members of a species under specified circumstances.

The Science of Life

In 1925 Huxley moved to King's College London as Professor of Zoology, but in 1927, to the amazement of his colleagues and on the prodding of H. G. Wells whom he had promised 1,000 words a day, he resigned his chair to work full-time with Wells and his son G. P. Wells on The Science of Life (see below).
The Science of Life is a book written by H. G. Wells, Julian Huxley and G. P. Wells, published in three volumes by The Waverley Publishing Company Ltd in 1929–30, giving a popular account of all major aspects of biology as known in the 1920s.

Newdigate Prize

That same year he won the Newdigate Prize for his poem "Holyrood".

King's Scholar

OppidansCollegeCollegers and Oppidans
At the age of thirteen Huxley attended Eton College as a King's Scholar, and continued to develop scientific interests; his grandfather had influenced the school to build science laboratories much earlier.

G. P. Wells

George Philip WellsGeorge PhilipGeorge Philip "Gip" Wells
In 1925 Huxley moved to King's College London as Professor of Zoology, but in 1927, to the amazement of his colleagues and on the prodding of H. G. Wells whom he had promised 1,000 words a day, he resigned his chair to work full-time with Wells and his son G. P. Wells on The Science of Life (see below).
He co-authored, with his father and Julian Huxley, The Science of Life.

Victor Stolan

Huxley's internationalist and conservation interests also led him, with Victor Stolan, Sir Peter Scott, Max Nicholson and Guy Mountfort, to set up the WWF (World Wide Fund for Nature under its former name of the World Wildlife Fund).
Victor Stolan (born 1893) provided "the germ of the idea" that led Julian Huxley and Max Nicholson with him to start the World Wildlife Fund.

Leonard Huxley (writer)

Leonard HuxleyLeonard Huxley,
His brother was the writer Aldous Huxley, and his half-brother a fellow biologist and Nobel laureate, Andrew Huxley; his father was writer and editor Leonard Huxley; and his paternal grandfather was Thomas Henry Huxley, a friend and supporter of Charles Darwin and proponent of evolution.
Their four children included the biologist Julian Huxley (1887–1975) and the writer Aldous Huxley (1894–1963).

Thomas Arnold

Dr ArnoldDr. ArnoldDr. Thomas Arnold
His maternal grandfather was the academic Tom Arnold, his great-uncle was poet Matthew Arnold and his great-grandfather was Thomas Arnold of Rugby School.
Their sons were Julian and Aldous Huxley.

Political and Economic Planning

Institute for Political and Economic Planning
Later, back in the United Kingdom, he became a founding member of the think tank Political and Economic Planning.
The original members included Nicholson and Barry, the zoologist Julian Huxley, the agronomist Leonard Elmhirst, the financier Basil Phillott Blackett, the civil servants Dennis Routh and Sir Henry Bunbury, the research chemist Michael Zvegintzov, and Israel Sieff, a director of Marks & Spencer.

World Wide Fund for Nature

World Wildlife FundWWFWorldwide Fund for Nature
He was secretary of the Zoological Society of London (1935–1942), the first Director of UNESCO, a founding member of the World Wildlife Fund and the first President of the British Humanist Association. Huxley's internationalist and conservation interests also led him, with Victor Stolan, Sir Peter Scott, Max Nicholson and Guy Mountfort, to set up the WWF (World Wide Fund for Nature under its former name of the World Wildlife Fund).
The idea for a fund on behalf of endangered animals was officially proposed by Victor Stolan to Sir Julian Huxley in response to articles he published in the British newspaper The Observer.

Zoological Society of London

FZSZoological SocietyLondon Zoological Society
He was secretary of the Zoological Society of London (1935–1942), the first Director of UNESCO, a founding member of the World Wildlife Fund and the first President of the British Humanist Association.

Peter Chalmers Mitchell

Sir Peter Chalmers MitchellMitchellP. Chalmers Mitchell
The previous Director, Peter Chalmers Mitchell, had been in post for many years, and had skillfully avoided conflict with the Fellows and Council.
Mitchell was succeeded by Julian Huxley.