Juliana of the Netherlands

Queen JulianaJulianaQueen Juliana of the NetherlandsPrincess JulianaPrincess Juliana of the NetherlandsAttempt at kidnapping Juliana of the NetherlandsCrown Princess JulianaJuliana, Queen of the NetherlandsQueen of the NetherlandsThe Queen
Juliana (Juliana Louise Emma Marie Wilhelmina; 30 April 1909 – 20 March 2004) was Queen of the Netherlands from 1948 until her abdication in 1980.wikipedia
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Wilhelmina of the Netherlands

Queen WilhelminaWilhelminaQueen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands
Juliana was the only child of Queen Wilhelmina and Prince Henry of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. Juliana was born in 30 April 1909 at Noordeinde Palace in The Hague, the only daughter of the reigning Dutch monarch, Queen Wilhelmina.
In 1901, she married Duke Henry of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, with whom she had a daughter, Juliana.

Prince Heinrich XXXII Reuss of Köstritz

Heinrich XXXIIPrince Heinrich XXXII Reuss, ''J(unior) L(ine)Prince Henry XXXII
The Queen's nearest relative was Prince Heinrich XXXII Reuss of Köstritz, whose close ties to Germany made him unpopular in the Netherlands.
Consequently, Heinrich was for all intents and purposes the heir presumptive to the Dutch throne until the birth of the future Queen Juliana in 1909.

Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld

Prince BernhardPrince Bernhard of the NetherlandsBernhard
In 1937, she married Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld with whom she had four children: Beatrix, Irene, Margriet, and Christina.
Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld (later Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands; German: Bernhard Friedrich Eberhard Leopold Julius Kurt Carl Gottfried Peter Graf von Biesterfeld; 29 June 1911 – 1 December 2004) was a Dutch prince who was the consort of Queen Juliana of the Netherlands; they were the parents of four children, including Princess Beatrix, who was Queen of the Netherlands from 1980 to 2013.

Apeldoorn

Apeldoorn, NetherlandsAppledornApeldorn
Juliana spent her childhood at Het Loo Palace in Apeldoorn, and at Noordeinde Palace and Huis ten Bosch Palace in The Hague.
It is called the Koningin Juliana Toren because of the tower, which was built in 1910 and was later named after Queen Juliana.

Beatrix of the Netherlands

Queen BeatrixBeatrixQueen Beatrix of the Netherlands
In 1937, she married Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld with whom she had four children: Beatrix, Irene, Margriet, and Christina.
Beatrix is the eldest daughter of Queen Juliana and her husband, Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld.

Duke Henry of Mecklenburg-Schwerin

Prince HendrikPrince HenryHenry
Juliana was the only child of Queen Wilhelmina and Prince Henry of Mecklenburg-Schwerin.
They had one child, Juliana, in whose favor Wilhelmina abdicated on 4 September 1948.

Baarn

Baarn, NetherlandsBaarn, the Netherlands
The young couple moved into Soestdijk Palace in Baarn.
The Soestdijk Palace in Baarn was the home of Queen Emma, Queen Juliana and Juliana's husband prince Bernard.

Leiden University

University of LeidenLeidenUniversity of Leyden
She received a private education and studied international law at the University of Leiden.
It is closely associated with the Dutch Royal Family, with Queen Juliana, Queen Beatrix and King Willem-Alexander being former alumni.

Soestdijk Palace

Palace SoestdijkPaleis Soestdijkpalace at Soestdijk
The young couple moved into Soestdijk Palace in Baarn.
It was the home for over six decades of Queen Juliana and her husband, Prince Bernhard until their deaths in 2004.

Succession to the Dutch throne

line of succession to the Dutch throneline of succession to the throneabsolute primogeniture
Had these arrangements not been made, Princess Margriet would not be in the line of succession.

Greet Hofmans

Margaretha HofmansGreet Hofmans affair
However, before that happened, her mother, the Princess, clinging to any thread that offered some hope for a cure, came under the strong influence of Greet Hofmans, a faith healer with heterodox beliefs, who was considered by "her many detractors" to be a sham.
For nine years she was a friend and advisor of Queen Juliana, often residing at Palace Soestdijk.

Extraterritoriality

extraterritorialextraterritorial rightsextraterritorial status
When her third child, Princess Margriet, was born on 19 January 1943, the Governor General of Canada Lord Athlone granted Royal Assent to a special law declaring Princess Juliana's rooms at the Ottawa Civic Hospital as extraterritorial in order that the infant would have exclusively Dutch, not dual nationality.
This was done to ensure that the newborn would derive her citizenship from her mother only, thus making her solely Dutch, which could be very important had the child been male, and as such, the heir of Princess Juliana.

Canadian Tulip Festival

Tulip FestivalDutch royalty giving tulips as gifts to Canadaidentical to one in Ottawa
Each year Ottawa hosts the Canadian Tulip Festival in celebration of this gift.
In 1945, the Dutch royal family sent 100,000 tulip bulbs to Ottawa in gratitude for Canadians having sheltered the future Queen Juliana and her family for the preceding three years during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands in the Second World War.

Dutch government-in-exile

governmentDutch government in exileNetherlands
Her mother and husband remained in Britain with the Dutch government-in-exile.
To safeguard the succession, the heir to the throne Princess Juliana and her family were sent farther to Canada, where they spent the war.

House of Orange-Nassau

House of OrangeOrange-NassauOrange
At the time, the House of Orange-Nassau was one of the most strictly religious royal families in the world, and it was very difficult to find a Protestant prince who suited their standards.
Her half-brother, Prince Alexander, had died in 1884, and no royal babies were born from then until Wilhelmina gave birth to her only child, Juliana, in 1909.

Princess Irene of the Netherlands

Princess IreneIrenehis wife Irene
In 1937, she married Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld with whom she had four children: Beatrix, Irene, Margriet, and Christina.
Princess Irene of the Netherlands (Irene Emma Elisabeth; born 5 August 1939) is the second child of Queen Juliana of the Netherlands and Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld.

House of Mecklenburg

House of Mecklenburg-StrelitzMecklenburg-SchwerinMecklenburg
Her mother issued a decree allowing her to adopt her husband's princely title as customary, providing that it is preceded by the title she held as a member of the House of Mecklenburg.
Queen Juliana of the Netherlands (1909-2004), former Queen of the Netherlands (1948-1980), was an agnatic member of this house.

Netherlands-Indonesian Union

De Nederlandse Unie
She became Hoofd der Unie (Head of the Union) of the Netherlands-Indonesian Union (1949-1956).

Nieuwe Kerk (Delft)

Nieuwe KerkNew ChurchNieuwe Kerk in Delft
She was embalmed, unlike her mother Wilhelmina, who chose not to be, and on 30 March 2004 interred beside her mother in the royal vaults under the Nieuwe Kerk in Delft.
The latest are Queen Juliana and her husband Prince Bernhard in 2004.

Prince Claus of the Netherlands

Prince ClausClaus von AmsbergClaus
Another crisis developed as a result of the announcement in July 1965 of the engagement of Princess Beatrix, heir to the throne, to German diplomat Claus von Amsberg.
Nonetheless, Queen Juliana gave the engagement her blessing after giving serious thought to canceling it.

Monarchy of the Netherlands

Queen of the NetherlandsDutch Royal FamilyKing of the Netherlands
After her accession to the throne, Juliana's official title was: "Her Majesty, Juliana, Queen of the Netherlands, Princess of Orange-Nassau, Duchess of Mecklenburg, Princess of Lippe-Biesterfeld, etc, etc, etc".
For example, Queen Juliana became queen on 4 September 1948 and princess again on 30 April 1980 following her abdication, but has been referred to as Queen Juliana since her death on 20 March 2004.

Alexander Cambridge, 1st Earl of Athlone

The Earl of AthlonePrince Alexander of TeckEarl of Athlone
When her third child, Princess Margriet, was born on 19 January 1943, the Governor General of Canada Lord Athlone granted Royal Assent to a special law declaring Princess Juliana's rooms at the Ottawa Civic Hospital as extraterritorial in order that the infant would have exclusively Dutch, not dual nationality.
Among the royal guests were Crown Prince Olav and Crown Princess Märtha of Norway; Grand Duchess Charlotte and Prince Felix of Luxembourg; King Peter of Yugoslavia; King George of Greece; Empress Zita of Bourbon-Parma (Austria) and her daughters; as well as Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands and her daughter, Princess Juliana.

Noordeinde Palace

Paleis NoordeindemonarchNoordeinde Royal Palace
Juliana spent her childhood at Het Loo Palace in Apeldoorn, and at Noordeinde Palace and Huis ten Bosch Palace in The Hague. Juliana was born in 30 April 1909 at Noordeinde Palace in The Hague, the only daughter of the reigning Dutch monarch, Queen Wilhelmina.
That same year Juliana acceded to the throne.

North Sea flood of 1953

North Sea floodEast Coast floods1953
On the night of 31 January 1953, the Netherlands was hit by the most destructive storm in more than five hundred years.
Queen Juliana and Princess Beatrix visited the flooded area only a few days after.

Stornoway (residence)

Stornowayofficial residenceStornoway residence
The princess remained there for a month before taking the children to Ottawa, the capital of Canada, where she resided at Stornoway in the suburb of Rockcliffe Park.
During the Second World War, from summer 1941 to 1945, Mrs. Perley-Robertson offered Stornoway to (then) Princess Juliana of the Netherlands as a temporary home-in-exile for the Dutch Royal Family, including the future Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands.