Julius Blank

Julius Blank (June 2, 1925 – September 17, 2011) was a semiconductor pioneer.wikipedia
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Traitorous eight

eight leading scientistsFairchildrenfounders of Fairchild
A member of the so-called traitorous eight, he left Nobel-winning physicist William Shockley's company to form Fairchild Semiconductor.
The eight who left Shockley Semiconductor were Julius Blank, Victor Grinich, Jean Hoerni, Eugene Kleiner, Jay Last, Gordon Moore, Robert Noyce, and Sheldon Roberts.

Fairchild Semiconductor

FairchildFairchild Semiconductor CorporationFairchild Camera & Instrument Corporation, Semiconductor Division
A member of the so-called traitorous eight, he left Nobel-winning physicist William Shockley's company to form Fairchild Semiconductor.
The eight men were Julius Blank, Victor Grinich, Jean Hoerni, Eugene Kleiner, Jay Last, Gordon Moore, Robert Noyce, and Sheldon Roberts.

Erasmus Hall High School

Erasmus HallErasmus High SchoolErasmus Hall Academy
Julius Blank attended Erasmus Hall High School, graduating at 15.

Jean Hoerni

Jean A. Hoerni
In August 1957 Julius Blank, Victor Grinich, Jean Hoerni, Eugene Kleiner, Jay Last, Gordon Moore, Robert Noyce and Sheldon Roberts reached an agreement with Sherman Fairchild of Fairchild Camera and Instrument Corporation.
But Shockley's strange behavior compelled the so-called "traitorous eight": Hoerni, Julius Blank, Victor Grinich, Eugene Kleiner, Jay Last, Gordon Moore, Robert Noyce and Sheldon Roberts, to leave his laboratory and create the Fairchild Semiconductor corporation.

Shockley Semiconductor Laboratory

Shockley SemiconductorShockleyShockley Transistor Corporation
Knapic was approached by William Shockley to form an engineering group at the Shockley Semiconductor Laboratory division of Beckman Instruments, in California.
Eventually a group of the youngest employees — Julius Blank, Victor Grinich, Jean Hoerni, Eugene Kleiner, Jay Last, Gordon Moore, Robert Noyce, and Sheldon Roberts — went over Shockley's head to Arnold Beckman, demanding that Shockley be replaced.

Jay Last

Jay T. Last
In August 1957 Julius Blank, Victor Grinich, Jean Hoerni, Eugene Kleiner, Jay Last, Gordon Moore, Robert Noyce and Sheldon Roberts reached an agreement with Sherman Fairchild of Fairchild Camera and Instrument Corporation.
The dissatisfied scientists included much of the core technical talent of the project: Julius Blank, Victor Grinich, Jean Hoerni, Eugene Kleiner, Jay Last, Gordon Moore, and Robert Noyce.

Nobel Prize

NobelNobel laureateNobel Prizes
A member of the so-called traitorous eight, he left Nobel-winning physicist William Shockley's company to form Fairchild Semiconductor.

William Shockley

William B. ShockleyWilliam Bradford ShockleyBill Shockley
A member of the so-called traitorous eight, he left Nobel-winning physicist William Shockley's company to form Fairchild Semiconductor.

Lower East Side

Lower East Side, ManhattanCorlear's HookLower East Side of Manhattan
Blank was born and raised in Manhattan's Lower East Side, the youngest of three children of Jewish immigrants Charles and Gussie Blank.

City College of New York

City CollegeCollege of the City of New YorkCCNY
He began taking classes at City College of New York while working at various jobs. In 1946 he returned home, where he completed his Bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the City College of New York, financed by the G.I. Bill.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
When he turned 18, he was drafted to serve in the U.S. Army in World War II.

Army Specialized Training Program

ASTPArmy Specialized Training CenterArmy Specialized Training Corpsmen
After basic infantry training, he was placed in the Army Specialized Training Program.

Battle of Hürtgen Forest

Battle of Hurtgen ForestHürtgen ForestBattle of the Hurtgen Forest
In April 1944, he was sent overseas, where he was injured in December 1944 during the Battle of Hürtgen Forest.

United States Army Air Corps

Army Air CorpsU.S. Army Air CorpsAir Corps
He was subsequently transferred to the Air Corps to serve as a machinist for airplane parts to overhaul radial engines.

Radial engine

radialradial enginesradial piston engine
He was subsequently transferred to the Air Corps to serve as a machinist for airplane parts to overhaul radial engines.

Bachelor's degree

bachelorbaccalaureatebachelor’s degree
In 1946 he returned home, where he completed his Bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the City College of New York, financed by the G.I. Bill.

Mechanical engineering

mechanical engineermechanicalmechanical engineers
In 1946 he returned home, where he completed his Bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the City College of New York, financed by the G.I. Bill.

G.I. Bill

GI BillGI Bill of RightsG.I. Bill of Rights
In 1946 he returned home, where he completed his Bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the City College of New York, financed by the G.I. Bill.

Babcock & Wilcox

B&WBabcockBabcock & Wilcox Company
Blank worked as an engineer at Babcock & Wilcox in Barberton, Ohio from 1950 to 1951, making large steam boilers for the power industry.

Barberton, Ohio

BarbertonBarberton, OHNew Portage (now Barberton), Ohio
Blank worked as an engineer at Babcock & Wilcox in Barberton, Ohio from 1950 to 1951, making large steam boilers for the power industry.

Goodyear Aerospace

GoodyearGoodyear-Zeppelin CorporationGoodyear Aircraft Company
He then moved to Goodyear Aircraft, where he worked from 1951 to 1952 on a wide variety of research and design projects including aircraft propulsion, air ship fabrics, parachutes, and submarines.

Manufacturing engineering

manufacturingmanufacturing engineerManufacturing systems engineering
After their return, Blank found a job in manufacturing engineering at Western Electric in Kearny, New Jersey where he worked from 1952 to 1956.

Western Electric

Western Electric CompanyWestrexWestern Electric Manufacturing Company
After their return, Blank found a job in manufacturing engineering at Western Electric in Kearny, New Jersey where he worked from 1952 to 1956.

Kearny, New Jersey

KearnyKearny, N.J.Kearney, New Jersey
After their return, Blank found a job in manufacturing engineering at Western Electric in Kearny, New Jersey where he worked from 1952 to 1956.

Class-4 telephone switch

tandem switchClass 4Class 4 telephone switch
At Western Electric he worked on No. 4 toll crossbar switching equipment, used in the first dialing systems for connecting calls automatically without a human long-distance operator.