Jussive mood

jussivejussives
The jussive (abbreviated ) is a grammatical mood of verbs for issuing orders, commanding, or exhorting (within a subjunctive framework).wikipedia
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Grammatical mood

moodmoodsmode
The jussive (abbreviated ) is a grammatical mood of verbs for issuing orders, commanding, or exhorting (within a subjunctive framework).
The usage of the indicative, subjunctive, and jussive moods in Classical Arabic is almost completely controlled by syntactic context.

Imperative mood

imperativeimperativesprohibitive
The mood is similar to the cohortative mood, which typically applies to the first person by appeal to the object's duties and obligations, and the imperative, which applies to the second (by command). The jussive mood, called the volitive in Esperanto, is used for wishing and requesting, and serves as the imperative.
Such imperatives imply a second-person subject (you), but some other languages also have first- and third-person imperatives, with the meaning of "let's (do something)" or "let him/her/them (do something)" (the forms may alternatively be called cohortative and jussive).

List of glossing abbreviations

abbreviatedglossing abbreviationglossing abbreviations
The jussive (abbreviated ) is a grammatical mood of verbs for issuing orders, commanding, or exhorting (within a subjunctive framework).

Subjunctive mood

subjunctivePresent subjunctiveconjunctive
It can also apply to orders by their author's wish in the mandative subjunctive. In the German language, the jussive mood is expressed using the present subjunctive (named "Konjunktiv I" or "Möglichkeitsform I" in German). In the Latin language, the present subjunctive can convey jussive meaning in the third person (jussive subjunctive or coniunctivus iussivus):
Jussive (issuing orders, commanding, or exhorting): Il faut qu’il comprenne cela ("It is necessary that he understand that")

Verb

verbsv.verbal morphology
The jussive (abbreviated ) is a grammatical mood of verbs for issuing orders, commanding, or exhorting (within a subjunctive framework).

Hortative

cohortativehortatorycohortative mood
The mood is similar to the cohortative mood, which typically applies to the first person by appeal to the object's duties and obligations, and the imperative, which applies to the second (by command).

Grammatical person

personthird personfirst person
The mood is similar to the cohortative mood, which typically applies to the first person by appeal to the object's duties and obligations, and the imperative, which applies to the second (by command).

German language

GermanGerman-languageGerman-speaking
In the German language, the jussive mood is expressed using the present subjunctive (named "Konjunktiv I" or "Möglichkeitsform I" in German).

Present tense

presentpresent indicativePRES
In the German language, the jussive mood is expressed using the present subjunctive (named "Konjunktiv I" or "Möglichkeitsform I" in German). In the Latin language, the present subjunctive can convey jussive meaning in the third person (jussive subjunctive or coniunctivus iussivus):

Latin

Lat.Latin languagelat
In the Latin language, the present subjunctive can convey jussive meaning in the third person (jussive subjunctive or coniunctivus iussivus):

Cicero

Marcus Tullius CiceroTullyCicero’s
iniurias fortunae [...] relinquas ("Leave behind [...] the wrongs of Fortune", saying from Cicero's Tusculanae Disputationes)

Tusculanae Disputationes

Tusculan DisputationsTusculan Disputation
iniurias fortunae [...] relinquas ("Leave behind [...] the wrongs of Fortune", saying from Cicero's Tusculanae Disputationes)

Virgil

VergilPublius Vergilius MaroVirgil’s
doceas iter ("Show us the way", poetry from Virgil's Aeneid)

Aeneid

ÆneidThe AeneidEneydos
doceas iter ("Show us the way", poetry from Virgil's Aeneid)

Volitive modality

volitivevolitive mood
The jussive mood, called the volitive in Esperanto, is used for wishing and requesting, and serves as the imperative.

Arabic verbs

verb form IVArabic verbderived stem
Six moods in the non-past only (indicative, subjunctive, jussive, imperative, and short and long energetics)

Diacritic

diacriticsdiacritical markdiacritical marks
For verbs, the ḍamma is for the imperfective, fatḥa for the perfective, and the sukūn is for verbs in the imperative or jussive moods.

Tetragrammaton

YHWHGodYahweh
2) Recently, as "Yahweh" is likely an imperfective verb form, "Yahu" is its corresponding preterite or jussive short form: compare yiŝt a hawe h (imperfective), yiŝtáhû (preterit or jussive short form) = "do obeisance".

English subjunctive

subjunctivesubjunctive moodpast subjunctive
The main use of the English present subjunctive, called the mandative or jussive subjunctive, occurs in that clauses (declarative content clauses; the word that is sometimes omitted in informal and conversational usage) expressing a circumstance that is desired, demanded, recommended, necessary, ''[https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/vel_sim.

Esperanto

EsperantistEsperantistsEsperanto language
They are present tense -as, future tense -os, past tense -is, infinitive mood -i, conditional mood -us and jussive mood -u (used for wishes and commands).

Stet

It is a form of the Latin verb sto, stare, steti, statum, . This usage of the verb, known as the "jussive subjunctive", derives from the active-voiced third-person subjunctive singular present and is typically translated as "Let it stand" or "As you were".

Uses of English verb forms

past progressivesimplefuture-in-the-past
Third person imperatives (jussives) are sometimes formed similarly, with let, as in "Let him be released".

Soddo language

SoddoSoddo Guragegru
There are also distinct jussive, imperative, and impersonal forms.

Esperanto grammar

grammarComparative ''theEsperanto grammar: Pronouns
The other moods are the infinitive, conditional, and jussive.