Justinian I

JustinianEmperor JustinianJustinian the GreatEmperor Justinian IJustinianusJustinian I the GreatJustinianicFlavius JustinianJustinian I "the GreatJustinianus I
Justinian I (Flavius Petrus Sabbatius Iustinianus Augustus; ; c. undefined 482 – 14 November 565), traditionally known as Justinian the Great and also Saint Justinian the Great in the Eastern Orthodox Church, was the Eastern Roman emperor from 527 to 565.wikipedia
1,848 Related Articles

Western Roman Empire

Western EmpireWesternWest
During his reign, Justinian sought to revive the empire's greatness and reconquer the lost western-half of the historical Roman Empire.
In the 6th century, emperor Justinian I re-imposed direct Imperial rule on large parts of the former Western Roman Empire, including the prosperous regions of North Africa, the ancient Roman heartland of Italy and parts of Hispania.

Narses

Subsequently, Belisarius, Narses, and other generals conquered the Ostrogothic kingdom, restoring Dalmatia, Sicily, Italy, and Rome to the empire after more than half a century of rule by the Ostrogoths. Other talented individuals included Tribonian, his legal adviser; Peter the Patrician, the diplomat and longtime head of the palace bureaucracy; Justinian's finance ministers John the Cappadocian and Peter Barsymes, who managed to collect taxes more efficiently than any before, thereby funding Justinian's wars; and finally, his prodigiously talented generals, Belisarius and Narses.
Narses (also sometimes written Nerses; Նարսես; Ναρσής; 478–573) was, with Belisarius, one of the great generals in the service of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I during the Roman reconquest that took place during Justinian's reign.

Spania

southern SpainSpanishByzantine conquest of Visigothic Baetica
The prefect Liberius reclaimed the south of the Iberian peninsula, establishing the province of Spania.
It was established by the Emperor Justinian I in an effort to restore the western provinces of the Empire.

Belisarius

Flavius BelisariusGeneral BelisariusBelisarius invades Africa
His general, Belisarius, swiftly conquered the Vandal Kingdom in North Africa. Other talented individuals included Tribonian, his legal adviser; Peter the Patrician, the diplomat and longtime head of the palace bureaucracy; Justinian's finance ministers John the Cappadocian and Peter Barsymes, who managed to collect taxes more efficiently than any before, thereby funding Justinian's wars; and finally, his prodigiously talented generals, Belisarius and Narses.
He also served in the guard of magister militum Praesentalis and future emperor Justinian.

Hagia Sophia

Haghia SophiaHagia Sophia MosqueAyasofya
His reign also marked a blossoming of Byzantine culture, and his building program yielded such masterpieces as the church of Hagia Sophia.
The current building was originally constructed as a church between 532 and 537 on the orders of the Byzantine emperor Justinian I and was the third Church of the Holy Wisdom to occupy the site, the prior one having been destroyed by rioters in the Nika riots.

Justin I

JustinEmperor JustinEmperor Justin I
The cognomen Iustinianus, which he took later, is indicative of adoption by his uncle Justin.
His reign is significant for the founding of the Justinian dynasty that included his eminent nephew Justinian I and three succeeding emperors.

Procopius

Procopius of CaesareaDe aedificiisSecret History
Another contemporary chronicler, Procopius, compares Justinian's appearance to that of tyrannical Emperor Domitian, although this is probably slander.
Accompanying the Byzantine general Belisarius in Emperor Justinian's wars, Procopius became the principal Byzantine historian of the 6th century, writing the History of the Wars, the Buildings, and the Secret History.

Nika riots

Nika revoltNika riotNika rioters
Justinian's rule was not universally popular; early in his reign he nearly lost his throne during the Nika riots, and a conspiracy against the emperor's life by dissatisfied businessmen was discovered as late as 562.
The Nika riots (Στάσις τοῦ Νίκα Stásis toû Níka), or Nika revolt, took place against Emperor Justinian I in Constantinople over the course of a week in 532 AD.

Vigilantia

He was succeeded by Justin II, who was the son of his sister Vigilantia and married to Sophia, the niece of Empress Theodora.
a. 490) was a sister of Byzantine emperor Justinian I (r.

Jurisprudence

Legal Studieslawjuridical
As a result, Justinian was well educated in jurisprudence, theology and Roman history.
It was during the Eastern Roman Empire (5th century) that legal studies were once again undertaken in depth, and it is from this cultural movement that Justinian's Corpus Juris Civilis was born.

Justin II

Emperor Justin IIJustinFlavius Justinus
He was succeeded by Justin II, who was the son of his sister Vigilantia and married to Sophia, the niece of Empress Theodora.
He was the husband of Sophia, nephew of Justinian I and the Empress Theodora, and was therefore a member of the Justinian Dynasty.

Corpus Juris Civilis

Corpus Iuris CivilisJustinian CodeJustinian's Code
A still more resonant aspect of his legacy was the uniform rewriting of Roman law, the Corpus Juris Civilis, which is still the basis of civil law in many modern states.
The Corpus Juris (or Iuris) Civilis ("Body of Civil Law") is the modern name for a collection of fundamental works in jurisprudence, issued from 529 to 534 by order of Justinian I, Eastern Roman Emperor.

John the Cappadocian

Flavius Marianus Michaelius Gabrielius Archangelius JohannesJohn of Cappadocia
Other talented individuals included Tribonian, his legal adviser; Peter the Patrician, the diplomat and longtime head of the palace bureaucracy; Justinian's finance ministers John the Cappadocian and Peter Barsymes, who managed to collect taxes more efficiently than any before, thereby funding Justinian's wars; and finally, his prodigiously talented generals, Belisarius and Narses.
John the Cappadocian (fl. 530s, living 548) was a praetorian prefect of the East (532–541) in the Byzantine Empire under Emperor Justinian I (r.

Roman law

RomanRoman civil lawlaw
Justinian achieved lasting fame through his judicial reforms, particularly through the complete revision of all Roman law, something that had not previously been attempted.
449 BC), to the Corpus Juris Civilis (AD 529) ordered by Eastern Roman Emperor Justinian I.

Tauresium

Gradište (Skopje)
Justinian was born in Tauresium, Dardania, around 482.
Tauresium is the birthplace of Byzantine Emperor Justinian I (ca.

Justiniana Prima

Iustiniana PrimaCaričin GradCaričin Grad – Iustiniana Prima, archaeological site
During his reign, he founded Justiniana Prima not far from his birthplace.
It was founded by Emperor Justinian I (527-565) and served as the metropolitan seat of the Archbishopric of Justiniana Prima, that had jurisdiction over the provinces of the Diocese of Dacia.

Peter the Patrician

Petrus PatriciusPeter of Thessalonica
Other talented individuals included Tribonian, his legal adviser; Peter the Patrician, the diplomat and longtime head of the palace bureaucracy; Justinian's finance ministers John the Cappadocian and Peter Barsymes, who managed to collect taxes more efficiently than any before, thereby funding Justinian's wars; and finally, his prodigiously talented generals, Belisarius and Narses.
In this capacity, he was one of the leading ministers of Emperor Justinian I (r.

Civil law (legal system)

civil lawcivilcivil law system
A still more resonant aspect of his legacy was the uniform rewriting of Roman law, the Corpus Juris Civilis, which is still the basis of civil law in many modern states.
AD 1–250), and in particular Justinian law (6th century AD), and further expanded and developed in the late Middle Ages under the influence of canon law.

Novellae Constitutiones

NovellaeNovellaNovel
It consists of the Codex Justinianeus, the Digesta or Pandectae, the Institutiones, and the Novellae.
The Novellae Constitutiones ("new constitutions"; Novellæ constitutiones, ), or Justinian's Novels, are now considered one of the four major units of Roman law initiated by Roman Emperor Justinian I in the course of his long reign (AD 527–565).

Digest (Roman law)

DigestPandectsThe Digest
It consists of the Codex Justinianeus, the Digesta or Pandectae, the Institutiones, and the Novellae.
The Digest, also known as the Pandects (Digesta seu Pandectae, adapted from pandéktēs, "all-containing"), is a name given to a compendium or digest of juristic writings on Roman law compiled by order of the Eastern Roman emperor Justinian I in the 6th century CE (530–533).

Liberius (praetorian prefect)

LiberiusPetrus Marcellinus Felix Liberiusprefect Liberius
The prefect Liberius reclaimed the south of the Iberian peninsula, establishing the province of Spania.
Her close relations to the Eastern Roman Emperor, Justinian, however, made her unpopular amongst the Gothic nobility.

Tribonian

Tribonium
Other talented individuals included Tribonian, his legal adviser; Peter the Patrician, the diplomat and longtime head of the palace bureaucracy; Justinian's finance ministers John the Cappadocian and Peter Barsymes, who managed to collect taxes more efficiently than any before, thereby funding Justinian's wars; and finally, his prodigiously talented generals, Belisarius and Narses.
Tribonian (Greek: Τριβωνιανός [trivonia'nos], c. 485?–542) was a notable Byzantine jurist and advisor, who during the reign of the Emperor Justinian I, supervised the revision of the legal code of the Byzantine Empire.

Church of the Holy Apostles

Apostles' Church in ConstantinopleChurch of the ApostlesHoly Apostles
Justinian's body was entombed in a specially built mausoleum in the Church of the Holy Apostles until it was desecrated and robbed during the pillage of the city in 1204 by the Latin States of the Fourth Crusade.
By the reign of the Emperor Justinian I, the church was no longer considered grand enough, and a new Church of the Holy Apostles was built on the same site.

Codex Justinianeus

Codex JustinianusCode of JustinianCodex
It consists of the Codex Justinianeus, the Digesta or Pandectae, the Institutiones, and the Novellae.
The Codex Justinianeus (Latin for the "Code of Justinian", Justinianeus meaning "Justinianian, of Justinian" ), also called Codex Justiniani, is one part of the Corpus Juris Civilis, the codification of Roman law ordered early in the 6th century AD by Justinian I, who was an Eastern Roman (Byzantine) emperor in Constantinople.

Courtesan

courtesanscourtisanCourtisane
She was by profession a courtesan and some twenty years his junior.
For example, the title was applied to the Byzantine empress Theodora, who had started life as an erotic actress but later became the wife of the Emperor Justinian and, after her death, an Orthodox saint.