K. Eric Drexler

Eric DrexlerDrexler Eric Drexler’sDrexler, K. Eric
Kim Eric Drexler (born April 25, 1955) is an American engineer best known for seminal studies of the potential of molecular nanotechnology (MNT), from the 1970s and 1980s.wikipedia
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Molecular nanotechnology

nanotechnologyadvanced nanotechnologymolecular
Kim Eric Drexler (born April 25, 1955) is an American engineer best known for seminal studies of the potential of molecular nanotechnology (MNT), from the 1970s and 1980s. The term "nano-technology" had been coined by the Tokyo Science University professor Norio Taniguchi in 1974 to describe the precision manufacture of materials with nanometer tolerances, and Drexler unknowingly used a related term in his 1986 book Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology to describe what later became known as molecular nanotechnology (MNT).
MNT nanofacturing is popularly linked with the idea of swarms of coordinated nanoscale robots working together, a popularization of an early proposal by K. Eric Drexler in his 1986 discussions of MNT, but superseded in 1992.

Gerard K. O'Neill

Gerard O'NeillO'NeillO'Neill Halo
He found Gerard K. O'Neill of Princeton University, a physicist famous for his work on storage rings for particle accelerators and his landmark work on the concepts of space colonization.
Among those who attended were Eric Drexler (at the time a freshman at MIT), scientist-astronaut Joe Allen (from Astronaut Group 6), Freeman Dyson, and science reporter Walter Sullivan.

Engines of Creation

Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology1986 discussions of MNT
The term "nano-technology" had been coined by the Tokyo Science University professor Norio Taniguchi in 1974 to describe the precision manufacture of materials with nanometer tolerances, and Drexler unknowingly used a related term in his 1986 book Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology to describe what later became known as molecular nanotechnology (MNT).
Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology is a 1986 molecular nanotechnology book written by K. Eric Drexler with a foreword by Marvin Minsky.

Nanotechnology

nanosciencenanotechnologiesnanotech
The term "nano-technology" had been coined by the Tokyo Science University professor Norio Taniguchi in 1974 to describe the precision manufacture of materials with nanometer tolerances, and Drexler unknowingly used a related term in his 1986 book Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology to describe what later became known as molecular nanotechnology (MNT).
Inspired by Feynman's concepts, K. Eric Drexler used the term "nanotechnology" in his 1986 book Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology, which proposed the idea of a nanoscale "assembler" which would be able to build a copy of itself and of other items of arbitrary complexity with atomic control.

Grey goo

Grey goo scenariogray goonanovirus plague
He also first published the term "grey goo" to describe what might happen if a hypothetical self-replicating molecular nanotechnology went out of control.
The term gray goo was coined by nanotechnology pioneer Eric Drexler in his 1986 book Engines of Creation.

Solar sail

light sailsolar sailslightsail
He fabricated metal films a few tens of nanometers thick on a wax support to demonstrate the potentials of high performance solar sails.
Eric Drexler developed a concept for a sail in which the polymer was removed.

Cryonics

cryoniccryonic suspensioncryonically
In March 2004, Drexler signed scientists' open letter in support of cryonics.
The use of vitrification rather than freezing for cryonics was anticipated in 1986, when K. Eric Drexler proposed a technique called fixation and vitrification, anticipating reversal by molecular nanotechnology.

Nanomedicine

medicalhealthcareNano
Robert Freitas - nanomedicine advocate
K. Eric Drexler, one of the founders of nanotechnology, postulated cell repair machines, including ones operating within cells and utilizing as yet hypothetical molecular machines, in his 1986 book Engines of Creation, with the first technical discussion of medical nanorobots by Robert Freitas appearing in 1999.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MITMassachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)M.I.T.
His 1991 doctoral thesis at Massachusetts Institute of Technology was revised and published as the book Nanosystems: Molecular Machinery Manufacturing and Computation (1992), which received the Association of American Publishers award for Best Computer Science Book of 1992.

Association of American Publishers

AAPAmerican Association of PublishersAmerican Book Publishers Council
His 1991 doctoral thesis at Massachusetts Institute of Technology was revised and published as the book Nanosystems: Molecular Machinery Manufacturing and Computation (1992), which received the Association of American Publishers award for Best Computer Science Book of 1992.

The Limits to Growth

limits to growthlimits-to-growthDynamo
K. Eric Drexler was strongly influenced by ideas on Limits to Growth in the early 1970s.

Princeton University

PrincetonCollege of New JerseyPrinceton College
He found Gerard K. O'Neill of Princeton University, a physicist famous for his work on storage rings for particle accelerators and his landmark work on the concepts of space colonization.

Storage ring

Particle storage ringE''xperimental ''S''torage ''R''ing (ESR)
He found Gerard K. O'Neill of Princeton University, a physicist famous for his work on storage rings for particle accelerators and his landmark work on the concepts of space colonization.

Particle accelerator

particle acceleratorsacceleratoraccelerators
He found Gerard K. O'Neill of Princeton University, a physicist famous for his work on storage rings for particle accelerators and his landmark work on the concepts of space colonization.

Space colonization

space coloniescolonizationspace colony
He found Gerard K. O'Neill of Princeton University, a physicist famous for his work on storage rings for particle accelerators and his landmark work on the concepts of space colonization.

Mass driver

mass driversa sort of guncatapult launcher
He was active in space politics, helping the L5 Society defeat the Moon Treaty in 1980. Besides working summers for O'Neill, building mass driver prototypes, Drexler delivered papers at the first three Space Manufacturing conferences at Princeton.

Richard Feynman

FeynmanRichard P. FeynmanFeynman, Richard
In 1979, he encountered Richard Feynman's provocative 1959 talk There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom.

Bachelor of Science

B.S.BSBSc
He received his B.S. in Interdisciplinary Sciences in 1977 and his M.S. in 1979 in Astro/Aerospace Engineering with a Master's thesis titled "Design of a High Performance Solar Sail System."

Aerospace engineering

aeronautical engineeraerospace engineerAerospace
He received his B.S. in Interdisciplinary Sciences in 1977 and his M.S. in 1979 in Astro/Aerospace Engineering with a Master's thesis titled "Design of a High Performance Solar Sail System."

Doctorate

doctoraldoctoral degreedoctorate degree
In 1991, he earned a Ph.D. through the MIT Media Lab (formally, the Media Arts and Sciences Section, School of Architecture and Planning) after the departments of electrical engineering and computer science refused to approve Drexler's plan of study.

Straw man

strawmanstraw menstraw-man
Drexler maintained that both were straw man arguments, and in the case of enzymes, wrote that "Prof. Klibanov wrote in 1994, ' ... using an enzyme in organic solvents eliminates several obstacles ... '" Drexler had difficulty in getting Smalley to respond, but in December 2003, Chemical and Engineering news carried a four-part debate.

Neal Stephenson

Neil StephensonStephen BuryStephenson
Drexler is mentioned in Neal Stephenson's science fiction novel The Diamond Age as one of the heroes of a future world where nanotechnology is ubiquitous.

Science fiction

sci-fiscience-fictionSF
Drexler is mentioned in Neal Stephenson's science fiction novel The Diamond Age as one of the heroes of a future world where nanotechnology is ubiquitous.

Decipher (novel)

DecipherDecipher'' (novel)
Drexler is also mentioned in the science fiction book Decipher by Stel Pavlou; his book is mentioned as one of the starting points of the nanomachine construction, as well as giving a better understanding of the way carbon 60 was to be applied.

Fullerene

fullerenesbuckyballsbuckminsterfullerene
Drexler is also mentioned in the science fiction book Decipher by Stel Pavlou; his book is mentioned as one of the starting points of the nanomachine construction, as well as giving a better understanding of the way carbon 60 was to be applied.