KTLA

KTLA-TVKTLA 5Golden West BroadcastersK25QB-DLos AngelesTribune Studios5Golden West TelevisionW6XYZcoverage
KTLA, virtual channel 5 (UHF digital channel 35), is a CW-affiliated television station licensed to Los Angeles, California, United States.wikipedia
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The CW

CWThe CW Television NetworkCW Network
KTLA, virtual channel 5 (UHF digital channel 35), is a CW-affiliated television station licensed to Los Angeles, California, United States.
It is also available in Canada on pay television providers through stations owned-and-operated by CBS Corporation and affiliates that are located within proximity to the Canada–United States border (whose broadcasts of CW shows are subject to simultaneous substitution laws imposed by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, if a Canadian network holds the broadcast rights); it is also available through two affiliates that are classified in the United States as superstations – New York City affiliate WPIX and Los Angeles affiliate KTLA.

Old Warner Brothers Studio

Sunset Bronson StudiosKTLA StudiosTribune Studios
KTLA's studios are located at the Sunset Bronson Studios at 5800 Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood, and its transmitter is located atop Mount Wilson.
In the mid-1950s, the studio lot was divided in two, between KTLA television and Paramount Pictures.

Paramount Television Network

ParamountMovietown, RSVPParamount Television
Paramount even launched a short-lived programming service, the Paramount Television Network, in 1948, with KTLA and WBKB-TV (now WBBM-TV) in Chicago serving as its flagship stations.
The company built television stations KTLA in Los Angeles and WBKB in Chicago; it also invested $400,000 in the DuMont Television Network, which operated stations WABD in New York City, WTTG in Washington, D.C., and WDTV in Pittsburgh.

Independent station (North America)

independent stationIndependentindependent stations
KTLA was originally affiliated with the DuMont Television Network, of which Paramount held a minority stake; it disaffiliated from the network in 1948 and converted into an independent station.
Some stations in larger markets (such as WGN-TV in Chicago; KTLA, KCOP-TV and KHJ-TV in Los Angeles; KWGN-TV in Denver; and (W)WOR-TV, WPIX and WNEW-TV in New York City) ventured into local news broadcasts, usually airing at 10:00 p.m. in the Eastern and Pacific time zones, and 9:00 p.m. in the Central and Mountain time zones.

KCOP-TV

KCOPKLAC-TVK17GJ
As a result, the agency did not allow DuMont to buy additional VHF stations—a problem that would later play a large role in the failure of DuMont, whose programming was splintered among other Los Angeles stations—including KTSL, KHJ-TV (channel 9, now KCAL-TV), KTTV (channel 11) and KCOP-TV (channel 13)—until the network's demise in 1956.
Operating as an independent station early on, it began running some programming from the DuMont Television Network in 1949 after KTLA (channel 5) disaffiliated from the network after a one-year tenure.

WGN-TV

WGNWGN 9K32MF-D
Although not as widespread in national carriage as its Chicago sister station WGN-TV, KTLA is available as a superstation throughout North America via DirecTV and Dish Network (the latter service available only to grandfathered subscribers that had purchased its a la carte superstation tier before Dish halted sales of the package to new subscribers in September 2013), as well as on cable providers in select cities within the southwestern United States and throughout Canada.
Tribune's later television purchases included those of WANX-TV (subsequently re-called WGNX, now WGCL-TV) in Atlanta (in 1983); KTLA in Los Angeles (in 1985); WPHL-TV in Philadelphia (in 1992); WLVI-TV in Boston (owned from 1994 to 2006); KHTV (now KIAH) in Houston (in 1995); KTTY (now KSWB-TV) in San Diego (in 1996); KCPQ and KTWB-TV (now KZJO) in Seattle (in 1998 and 1999, respectively); and WBDC-TV (now WDCW) in Washington, D.C. (in 1999).

KCBS-TV

KCBSKNXTCBS Los Angeles
Estimates of television sets in Los Angeles County at the time ranged from 350 to 600, since experimental station W6XAO (later KTSL and KNXT, now KCBS-TV) was already in operation broadcasting with a regular schedule.
The station was granted a commercial license (the second in California, behind KTLA) as KTSL on May 6, 1948, and was named for Thomas '''S.

WBBM-TV

WBBMWBKBCBS Chicago
Paramount even launched a short-lived programming service, the Paramount Television Network, in 1948, with KTLA and WBKB-TV (now WBBM-TV) in Chicago serving as its flagship stations.
Paramount also owned KTLA in Los Angeles; since DuMont already owned WABD (now WNYW) in New York City, WTTG in Washington, D.C. and WDTV (now sister station KDKA-TV) in Pittsburgh, the FCC's decision meant neither Paramount nor DuMont could acquire any more television stations.

Paramount Pictures

ParamountParamount StudiosParamount British Pictures
The station was originally owned by Paramount Pictures subsidiary Television Productions, Inc., and was based at the Paramount Studios lot.
The Los Angeles station eventually became KTLA, the first commercial station on the West Coast.

Solid Gold (TV series)

Solid GoldA Solid Gold ChristmasSolid Gold Christmas Special '82
The former Warner Bros./Paramount lot is now known as Sunset Bronson Studios, where KTLA's facility remains based to this day, and where shows such as WKRP in Cincinnati, Judge Judy, Hannah Montana, The Gong Show, Solid Gold, Name That Tune, Family Feud, The Newlywed Game, MADtv and Let's Make a Deal have been produced over the years.
From its debut in 1980 until the end of its fourth season, the show was taped at the Golden West Broadcasters studio facility.

KCAL-TV

KHJ-TVKCALKCAL 9
As a result, the agency did not allow DuMont to buy additional VHF stations—a problem that would later play a large role in the failure of DuMont, whose programming was splintered among other Los Angeles stations—including KTSL, KHJ-TV (channel 9, now KCAL-TV), KTTV (channel 11) and KCOP-TV (channel 13)—until the network's demise in 1956.
In the early 1970s, KHJ-TV sought a similar programming strategy to that of crosstown competitor KTLA (channel 5), which focused more on talk shows, game shows, sports, feature films and off-network drama series.

Superstation

superstationscable superstationsvia satellite
Although not as widespread in national carriage as its Chicago sister station WGN-TV, KTLA is available as a superstation throughout North America via DirecTV and Dish Network (the latter service available only to grandfathered subscribers that had purchased its a la carte superstation tier before Dish halted sales of the package to new subscribers in September 2013), as well as on cable providers in select cities within the southwestern United States and throughout Canada.
On February 15, 1988, Eastern Microwave Inc. began distributing WSBK-TV and KTLA (channel 5) in Los Angeles via the Satcom I-R satellite.

Owned-and-operated station

owned-and-operatedO&Oowned and operated
In 1979, KTLA acquired much of the programming inventory of struggling independent competitor KBSC-TV (channel 52, now Telemundo owned-and-operated station KVEA) including The Little Rascals, The Three Stooges, The Munsters, The Addams Family, Gilligan's Island, Leave It to Beaver, among others.
While Tribune-owned stations such as WGN-TV in Chicago, WPIX in New York City and KTLA in Los Angeles (along with most of the ACME stations) aired programming from The WB, they did not fit the standard definition of an owned-and-operated station.

KTTV

KTTV-TVKTTV 11Los Angeles
As a result, the agency did not allow DuMont to buy additional VHF stations—a problem that would later play a large role in the failure of DuMont, whose programming was splintered among other Los Angeles stations—including KTSL, KHJ-TV (channel 9, now KCAL-TV), KTTV (channel 11) and KCOP-TV (channel 13)—until the network's demise in 1956.
A few months later, channel 11 agreed to become the new Los Angeles outlet of the DuMont Television Network, which had been affiliated with KTSL and, before that, KTLA (channel 5).

Mount Wilson (California)

Mount WilsonMt. WilsonMount Wilson in California
KTLA's studios are located at the Sunset Bronson Studios at 5800 Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood, and its transmitter is located atop Mount Wilson.
The first television antenna on Mount Wilson was erected in 1947 for pioneer station KTLA channel 5.

The WB

WBThe WB Television NetworkWB Network
On November 2, 1993, the Warner Bros. Television division of Time Warner and the Tribune Company announced the formation of The WB Television Network.
On November 2, 1993, the Warner Bros. Entertainment division of Time Warner announced the formation of The WB Television Network, with the Tribune Company holding a minority interest; as such, Tribune Broadcasting signed agreements to affiliate six of its seven television stations at the time – all of which were independent stations, including the television group's two largest stations, WPIX in New York City and KTLA in Los Angeles – with the network.

Los Angeles Times

The Los Angeles TimesLA TimesL.A. Times
The Tribune Company purchased the Times Mirror Company (then-owners of the Los Angeles Times) in 2000, bringing the newspaper into common ownership with channel 5; ironically, the Los Angeles Times was the original owner of Fox owned-and-operated station KTTV from 1949 (under a joint venture with CBS through 1951) until it sold the station to Metromedia (successor to DuMont's owned and operated stations) in 1963 (that company would eventually become Fox Television Stations upon Metromedia's 1986 merger with News Corporation); as FCC rules prohibited the common ownership of newspapers and broadcast outlets in the same market, Tribune filed for and was granted a waiver by the agency in order to acquire the Times.
In 2000, the Times-Mirror Company, publisher of the Times, was purchased by the Tribune Company of Chicago, Illinois, placing the paper in co-ownership with then-WB (now CW)-affiliated KTLA, which Tribune acquired in 1985.

Larry McCormick (TV)

Larry McCormick
In addition to the station itself, six other individuals associated with KTLA—former owner Gene Autry, newsmen Hal Fishman, George Putnam, Stan Chambers and Larry McCormick, and founding manager Klaus Landsberg—have received stars on the Walk of Fame.
Lawrence William "Larry" McCormick (February 3, 1933 – August 27, 2004) was an American television actor, reporter and news anchor, most notably working for Los Angeles television station KTLA-TV.

Stan Chambers

In addition to the station itself, six other individuals associated with KTLA—former owner Gene Autry, newsmen Hal Fishman, George Putnam, Stan Chambers and Larry McCormick, and founding manager Klaus Landsberg—have received stars on the Walk of Fame.
Stanley Holroyd "Stan" Chambers (August 11, 1923 – February 13, 2015) was an American television reporter who worked for KTLA in Los Angeles from 1947 to 2010.

KVEA

KVEA-TVKBSCKBSC-TV
In 1979, KTLA acquired much of the programming inventory of struggling independent competitor KBSC-TV (channel 52, now Telemundo owned-and-operated station KVEA) including The Little Rascals, The Three Stooges, The Munsters, The Addams Family, Gilligan's Island, Leave It to Beaver, among others.
KBSC was never a serious competitor against established independents KTLA (channel 5), KHJ-TV (channel 9, now KCAL-TV), KTTV (channel 11) and KCOP (channel 13).

Klaus Landsberg

Klaus Landsberg, already an accomplished television pioneer at the age of 26, was the original station manager and engineer.
In 1941 Klaus was sent by Paramount Pictures to Los Angeles to build W6XYZ, an experimental television station.

DirecTV

Direct TVDirectTVDirecTV Sports
Although not as widespread in national carriage as its Chicago sister station WGN-TV, KTLA is available as a superstation throughout North America via DirecTV and Dish Network (the latter service available only to grandfathered subscribers that had purchased its a la carte superstation tier before Dish halted sales of the package to new subscribers in September 2013), as well as on cable providers in select cities within the southwestern United States and throughout Canada.
In markets that lack an OTA CW affiliate, DirecTV offers WDCW from Washington or KTLA from Los Angeles (both in standard definition, only).

Hollywood

Hollywood, CaliforniaHollywood, CAHollywood, Los Angeles, California
KTLA's studios are located at the Sunset Bronson Studios at 5800 Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood, and its transmitter is located atop Mount Wilson.
On January 22, 1947, the first commercial television station west of the Mississippi River, KTLA, began operating in Hollywood.

KSPN (AM)

KSPNKMPCKSPN (AM 710)
In November 1963, KTLA was purchased by actor and singer Gene Autry for $12 million; upon the sale's finalization in May 1964, Autry merged the station with his other broadcasting properties, including KMPC radio (710 AM, now KSPN) into an umbrella company known as Golden West Broadcasters.
In November 1963, Autry acquired Channel 5 KTLA, LA's top independent television station.

Gene Autry

The Gene Autry ShowGolden West BroadcastersGene
In November 1963, KTLA was purchased by actor and singer Gene Autry for $12 million; upon the sale's finalization in May 1964, Autry merged the station with his other broadcasting properties, including KMPC radio (710 AM, now KSPN) into an umbrella company known as Golden West Broadcasters.
Earlier, in 1982, he sold Los Angeles television station KTLA for $245 million.