Kabbalah

KabbalistickabbalistKabbalistsKabbalaCabalakabalisticcabalisticcabalistkabalistKabbalism
Kabbalah (, literally "reception, tradition" or "correspondence") is an esoteric method, discipline, and school of thought in Jewish mysticism.wikipedia
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Jewish philosophy

Jewish theologyJewish philosopherJewish
Kabbalah (, literally "reception, tradition" or "correspondence") is an esoteric method, discipline, and school of thought in Jewish mysticism.
The philosophy was generally in competition with Kabbalah.

Jewish mysticism

mysticalmysticismJewish mystics
Kabbalah (, literally "reception, tradition" or "correspondence") is an esoteric method, discipline, and school of thought in Jewish mysticism.
Of these, Kabbalah, which emerged in 12th-century Europe, is the most well known, but not the only typologic form, or the earliest to emerge.

Ein Sof

Ain SophAin Soph AurAyn Sof
Jewish Kabbalah is a set of esoteric teachings meant to explain the relationship between God, the unchanging, eternal, and mysterious Ein Sof (, "The Infinite"), and the mortal and finite universe (God's creation).
Ein Sof, or Eyn Sof, in Kabbalah, is understood as God prior to any self-manifestation in the production of any spiritual realm, probably derived from Solomon ibn Gabirol's ( 1021 – 1070) term, "the Endless One" (she-en lo tiklah).

List of Jewish Kabbalists

Timeline List of Jewish KabbalistsJewish Kabbalists
Jewish Kabbalists originally developed their own transmission of sacred texts within the realm of Jewish tradition, and often use classical Jewish scriptures to explain and demonstrate its mystical teachings.
This page lists figures in Kabbalah according to historical chronology and schools of thought.

Christian Kabbalah

CabbalaChristian KabbalistChristian Cabala
The definition of Kabbalah varies according to the tradition and aims of those following it, from its religious origin as an integral part of Judaism, to its later adaptations in Western esotericism (Christian Kabbalah and Hermetic Qabalah).
Interest grew among some Christian scholars in the mystical aspects of Jewish Kabbalah, which they interpreted under their Christian theology.

Zohar

The ZoharinterpretationBook of Radiance
One of the fundamental kabbalistic texts, the Zohar, was first published in the 13th century, and the almost universal form adhered to in modern Judaism is Lurianic Kabbalah.
The Zohar (, lit. "Splendor" or "Radiance") is the foundational work in the literature of Jewish mystical thought known as Kabbalah.

Western esotericism

esotericesotericismesotericist
Kabbalah (, literally "reception, tradition" or "correspondence") is an esoteric method, discipline, and school of thought in Jewish mysticism. The definition of Kabbalah varies according to the tradition and aims of those following it, from its religious origin as an integral part of Judaism, to its later adaptations in Western esotericism (Christian Kabbalah and Hermetic Qabalah).
Renaissance Europe saw increasing interest in many of these older ideas, with various intellectuals combining "pagan" philosophies with the Kabbalah and Christian philosophy, resulting in the emergence of esoteric movements like Christian theosophy.

Gershom Scholem

Gershom SholemGershon ScholemG. Scholem
During the 20th-century, academic interest in Kabbalistic texts led primarily by the Jewish historian Gershom Scholem has inspired the development of historical research on Kabbalah in the field of Judaic studies.
He is widely regarded as the founder of the modern, academic study of Kabbalah, becoming the first Professor of Jewish Mysticism at Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Lurianic Kabbalah

LurianicLurianic doctrineLurianic Kabbalistic
One of the fundamental kabbalistic texts, the Zohar, was first published in the 13th century, and the almost universal form adhered to in modern Judaism is Lurianic Kabbalah.
Lurianic Kabbalah is a school of kabbalah named after the Jewish rabbi who developed it: Isaac Luria (1534–1572; also known as the "ARI'zal", "Ha'ARI" or "Ha'ARI Hakadosh").

Mysticism

mysticmysticalmystics
It forms the foundation of mystical religious interpretations within Judaism.
According to Merkur, Kabbala and Buddhism also emphasize nothingness.

Hermetic Qabalah

QabalahQabalisticQabalist
The definition of Kabbalah varies according to the tradition and aims of those following it, from its religious origin as an integral part of Judaism, to its later adaptations in Western esotericism (Christian Kabbalah and Hermetic Qabalah).
It draws on a great many influences, most notably: Jewish Kabbalah, Western astrology, Alchemy, Pagan religions, especially Egyptian and Greco-Roman (it is from the latter that the term "Hermetic" is derived), neoplatonism, gnosticism, the Enochian system of angelic magic of John Dee and Edward Kelley, hermeticism, tantra and the symbolism of the tarot.

Sefirot

SephirotSephirahSephiroth
It is therefore important to bear in mind when discussing things such as the sephirot and their interactions that one is dealing with highly abstract concepts that at best can only be understood intuitively.
Sefirot ( səp̄îrôṯ), meaning emanations, are the 10 attributes/emanations in Kabbalah, through which Ein Sof (The Infinite) reveals Themself and continuously creates both the physical realm and the chain of higher metaphysical realms (Seder hishtalshelus).

Judaism

JewishJewsJudaic
Jewish Kabbalists originally developed their own transmission of sacred texts within the realm of Jewish tradition, and often use classical Jewish scriptures to explain and demonstrate its mystical teachings.
Thus, although there is an esoteric tradition in Judaism (Kabbalah), Rabbinic scholar Max Kadushin has characterized normative Judaism as "normal mysticism", because it involves everyday personal experiences of God through ways or modes that are common to all Jews.

Hasidic Judaism

HasidicHasidismHasidim
Isaac Luria is considered the father of contemporary Kabbalah; Lurianic Kabbalah was popularised in the form of Hasidic Judaism from the 18th century onwards.
In the 16th century, when Kabbalah spread, the title also became associated with it.

Abraham Abulafia

AbulafiaAbraham ben Samuel AbulafiaAvraham Abulafia
Abraham ben Samuel Abulafia was the founder of the school of "Prophetic Kabbalah".

Christian Hebraist

Christian authorsChristian HebraistsHebraist
From the Renaissance onwards Jewish Kabbalah texts entered non-Jewish culture, where they were studied and translated by Christian Hebraists and Hermetic occultists.
The main area of study is that commonly known as the Old Testament to Christians (and Tanakh to Jews), but Christians have occasionally taken an interest in the Talmud, and Kabbalah.

Pardes (Jewish exegesis)

Pardesderashcommentaries
The mystical view of esoteric Sod-Secret as the elite doctrines of Kabbalah also gave conceptual context to Peshat, Remez, and Drush: in the mystical unfolding of the spiritual Four Worlds, each realm corresponds to a level in PaRDeS.

Isaac ben Samuel of Acre

Isaac of AccoIsaac of AcreRabbi Isaac of Akko
Isaac ben Samuel of Acre (fl. 13th–14th century) (Hebrew: יצחק בן שמואל דמן עכו, Yitzhak ben Shmuel d'min Akko) was a Jewish kabbalist who fled to Spain.

Nachman of Breslov

Rabbi NachmanNachman of BreslavRebbe Nachman
For a few centuries the esoteric knowledge was referred to by its aspect practice—meditation Hitbonenut, Rebbe Nachman of Breslov's Hitbodedut, translated as "being alone" or "isolating oneself", or by a different term describing the actual, desired goal of the practice—prophecy ("NeVu'a" נְבוּאָה).
Rebbe Nachman, a great-grandson of the Baal Shem Tov, revived the Hasidic movement by combining the esoteric secrets of Judaism (the Kabbalah) with in-depth Torah scholarship.

Torah study

Torahstudiedstudied Torah
Although the word "Torah" refers specifically to the Five Books of Moses, in Judaism the word also refers to the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible), the Talmud and other religious works, even including the study of Kabbalah, Hasidism, Mussar and much more.

Shem HaMephorash

ShemhamphoraschShemhamforashShemhamphorae
The 72 letter name of God which is used in Jewish mysticism for meditation purposes is derived from the Hebrew verbal utterance Moses spoke in the presence of an angel, while the Sea of Reeds parted, allowing the Hebrews to escape their approaching attackers.
The Shem HaMephorash (Hebrew: שם המפורש, alternatively Shem ha-Mephorash or Schemhamphoras), meaning the explicit name, is an originally Tannaitic term describing a hidden name of God in Kabbalah (including Christian and Hermetic variants), and in some more mainstream Jewish discourses.

List of Jewish mysticism scholars

Academic studyhistorical research on KabbalahJewish mysticism studies in academia
During the 20th-century, academic interest in Kabbalistic texts led primarily by the Jewish historian Gershom Scholem has inspired the development of historical research on Kabbalah in the field of Judaic studies.
The historical development of Jewish mysticism under study covers the range of phases, forms and expressions, from early Rabbinic Merkabah mysticism, through Medieval Hasidei Ashkenaz and Classical Kabbalah, early-modern Safed Kabbalah and Sabbateanism, to modern Hasidism and 20th century expressions.

Moses ben Jacob Cordovero

Moshe CordoveroMoses CordoveroMoshe Cordevero
Moses Cordovero and his school popularized the teachings of the Zohar which had until then been only a restricted work.
Moses ben Jacob Cordovero ( Moshe Kordovero ‎; 1522–1570) was a central figure in the historical development of Kabbalah, leader of a mystical school in 16th-century Safed, Ottoman Syria.

Merkabah mysticism

MerkabahMerkavahMerkaba
Merkabah mysticism alluded to the encrypted knowledge within the book of the prophet Ezekiel describing his vision of the "Divine Chariot".
It is a form of pre-Kabbalah Jewish mysticism that teaches both of the possibility of making a sublime journey to God and of the ability of man to draw down divine powers to earth; it seems to have been an esoteric movement that grew out of the priestly mysticism already evident in the Dead Sea Scrolls and some apocalyptic writings (see the studies by Rachel Elior).

Nachmanides

NahmanidesRambanNaḥmanides
One of the best known is Nahmanides (the Ramban) (1194–1270) whose commentary on the Torah is considered to be based on Kabbalistic knowledge.
Moses ben Nahman ( Mōšeh ben-Nāḥmān, "Moses son of Nahman"; 1194–1270), commonly known as Nachmanides (Ναχμανίδης Nakhmanídēs), and also referred to by the acronym Ramban and by the contemporary nickname Bonastruc ça Porta (literally "Mazel Tov near the Gate", see astruc), was a leading medieval Jewish scholar, Sephardic rabbi, philosopher, physician, kabbalist, and biblical commentator.