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Former Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut for Chemistry in Berlin, the place at which nuclear fission was first detected
Max Planck, after whom the society is named.
Former Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut for Biology, Berlin
Entrance of the administrative headquarters of the Max Planck Society in Munich
Opening of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut in Berlin-Dahlem, 1913. From right: Adolf von Harnack, Friedrich von Ilberg, Kaiser Wilhelm II, Carl Neuberg, August von Trott zu Solz

Founded in 1911 as the Kaiser Wilhelm Society, it was renamed to the Max Planck Society in 1948 in honor of its former president, theoretical physicist Max Planck.

- Max Planck Society

Its functions were taken over by the Max Planck Society.

- Kaiser Wilhelm Society
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Planck in 1933

Max Planck

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German theoretical physicist whose discovery of energy quanta won him the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1918.

German theoretical physicist whose discovery of energy quanta won him the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1918.

Planck in 1933
Planck in 1930
Max Planck's signature at ten years of age
A side portrait of Planck as a young adult, c. 1878
Plaque at the Humboldt University of Berlin: "Max Planck, discoverer of the elementary quantum of action h, taught in this building from 1889 to 1928."
Planck in 1918, the year he received the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on quantum theory
From left to right: W. Nernst, A. Einstein, Planck, R.A. Millikan and von Laue at a dinner given by von Laue in Berlin on 11 November 1931
Planck's grave in Göttingen
Vorlesungen über die Theorie der Wärmestrahlung, 1906

In 1948, the German scientific institution Kaiser Wilhelm Society (of which Planck was twice president) was renamed Max Planck Society (MPG).

Otto Hahn

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German chemist who was a pioneer in the fields of radioactivity and radiochemistry.

German chemist who was a pioneer in the fields of radioactivity and radiochemistry.

William Ramsay, London 1905
Ernest Rutherford at McGill University, Montreal 1905
Hahn and Meitner, 1913, in the chemical laboratory of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry. When a colleague she did not recognise said that they had met before, Meitner replied: "You probably mistake me for Professor Hahn."
Physicists and chemists in Berlin in 1920. Front row, left to right: Hertha Sponer, Albert Einstein, Ingrid Franck, James Franck, Lise Meitner, Fritz Haber, and Otto Hahn. Back row, left to right: Walter Grotrian, Wilhelm Westphal,
Otto von Baeyer, Peter Pringsheim and Gustav Hertz
Former Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry building in Berlin. Heavily damaged by bombing during the Second World War, it was restored and became part of the Free University of Berlin. It was renamed the Otto Hahn Building in 1956, and the Hahn-Meitner Building in 2010.
Marble plaque in Latin by Professor Massimo Ragnolini, commemorating the honeymoon of Otto Hahn and his wife Edith at Punta San Vigilio, Lake Garda, Italy, in March and April 1913
Hahn in uniform in 1915.
The decay chain of actinium. Alpha decay shifts two elements down; beta decay shifts one element up.
Decay chain of uranium-238
This was touted for many years as the table and experimental apparatus with which Otto Hahn discovered nuclear fission in 1938. The table and instruments are representative of the ones used, but not necessarily the originals, and would not have been together on the one table in the same room. Pressure from historians, scientists and feminists caused the museum to alter the display in 1988 to acknowledge Lise Meitner, Otto Frisch and Fritz Strassmann.
Otto Hahn's notebook
Plaque commemorating Hahn and Strassmann's discovery of fission in Berlin (unveiled in 1956)
Farm Hall (seen here in 2015)
5 DM coin, Germany, honouring Hahn and his discovery of fission, 1979
Monument in Berlin-Dahlem, in front of the Otto-Hahn-Platz
Otto Hahn with his wife Edith, 1959
Otto Hahn on a stamp of the German Democratic Republic, 1979
Bust by Knud Knudsen
Hahn's grave in Göttingen

In 1912, he became head of the Radioactivity Department of the newly founded Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Chemistry.

Hahn served as the last president of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society for the Advancement of Science in 1946 and as the founding president of its successor, the Max Planck Society from 1948 to 1960.

Fritz Haber, c. 1919

Fritz Haber

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German chemist who received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1918 for his invention of the Haber–Bosch process, a method used in industry to synthesize ammonia from nitrogen gas and hydrogen gas.

German chemist who received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1918 for his invention of the Haber–Bosch process, a method used in industry to synthesize ammonia from nitrogen gas and hydrogen gas.

Fritz Haber, c. 1919
Clara Immerwahr
The grave of Fritz and Clara Haber (née Immerwahr) in the Hörnli graveyard of Basel, Switzerland

From 1919 to 1925, in response to a request made by German ambassador Wilhelm Solf to Japan for Japanese support for German scholars in times of financial hardship, a Japanese businessman named Hoshi Hajime, the president of Hoshi Pharmaceutical Company, donated two million Reichsmark to the Kaiser Wilhelm Society as the ‘Japan Fund’ (Hoshi-Ausschuss).

In 1981, the Minerva foundation of the Max Planck Society and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HUJI) established the Fritz Haber Research Center for Molecular Dynamics, based at the Institute of Chemistry of the Hebrew University.

Walther Bothe in the 1950s

Walther Bothe

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German nuclear physicist, who shared the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1954 with Max Born.

German nuclear physicist, who shared the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1954 with Max Born.

Walther Bothe in the 1950s
Walther Bothe

In the year after Bothe's death, his Physics Institute at the KWImF was elevated to the status of a new institute under the Max Planck Society and it then became the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics.

Ludolf von Krehl, Director of the KWImF, and Max Planck, President of the Kaiser-Wilhelm Gesellschaft (KWG, Kaiser Wilhelm Society, today the Max Planck Society), had offered the directorship to Bothe to ward off the possibility of his emigration.

University of Göttingen

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Public research university in the city of Göttingen, Germany.

Public research university in the city of Göttingen, Germany.

King George II, founder and president of the university
King George II in the Pauliner Church in 1748
Alte Aula (Great Hall), also Karzer, at Wilhelmsplatz (built in 1835–1837)
The interior of the university Aula
Sign at Göttingen train station displaying the motto Stadt, die Wissen schafft ("City that creates knowledge", playing also with the German word "Wissenschaft", English "science").
Central Library and "Raumskulptur" sculpture
The old Auditorium Maximum (built in 1826–1865)
Traditional Observatory of the university
The Pauliner Church, once the seat of the University Library in which Heinrich Heine, the Brothers Grimm, and Goethe worked
The Alte Mensa
Carl Friedrich Gauss
Bernhard Riemann
David Hilbert
Felix Klein
Constantin Carathéodory
Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet
J. Robert Oppenheimer
Friedrich Wöhler
Heinrich Heine
Brothers Grimm
Arthur Schopenhauer
Rudolf von Jhering
Otto von Bismarck
Richard von Weizsäcker
Gerhard Schröder
Max Weber
Jürgen Habermas
John von Neumann
Gottlieb Burckhardt
Rudolph Sohm
William Graham Sumner
Emmy Noether
Edward Teller
August Weismann
Emil Wiechert
Arnold Sommerfeld
Ludwig Prandtl
Theodore von Kármán
J.P. Morgan
Maria Goeppert-Mayer physicist
Hsu Tzong-Li Chief Justice & President of Judicial Yuan Taiwan
R. G. Bhandarkar Orientalist
Karl Heinrich Ulrichs pioneer of the gay rights movement

Furthermore, the university maintains strong connections with major research institutes based in Göttingen, such as those of the Max Planck Society and the Leibniz Association.

In 1925, Prandtl was appointed as the director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Fluid Mechanics.

Max Planck Institute for Biology in Tübingen, Germany

Max Planck Institute for Biology

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Located in Tübingen, Germany, and has been re-established in January 2022.

Located in Tübingen, Germany, and has been re-established in January 2022.

Max Planck Institute for Biology in Tübingen, Germany

The Kaiser Wilhelm Society, the predecessor organization of the Max Planck Society, established various natural science research institutes in the Berlin district of Dahlem in the beginning of the 20th century.

Aerial view of the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics with assembly hall (left) and lecture hall (right)

Max Planck Institute for Physics

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Physics institute in Munich, Germany that specializes in high energy physics and astroparticle physics.

Physics institute in Munich, Germany that specializes in high energy physics and astroparticle physics.

Aerial view of the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics with assembly hall (left) and lecture hall (right)

It is part of the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft and is also known as the Werner Heisenberg Institute, after its first director in its current location.

On October 1, 1917, the institute was officially founded in Berlin as Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut für Physik (KWIP, Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Physics) with Albert Einstein as the first head director.

Adolf von Harnack

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Baltic German Lutheran theologian and prominent Church historian.

Baltic German Lutheran theologian and prominent Church historian.

Adolf von Harnack (right) close to Kaiser Wilhelm II on the occasion of the inauguration of a new Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut (1913).

He played an important role in the foundation of the Kaiser Wilhelm Gesellschaft and became its first president.

After a long period in U.S. Army hands after World War II it has now resumed the role Harnack envisaged, as a centre for international intellectual life in the German capital, under the management of the KWG's successor organisation, the Max Planck Gesellschaft.

Vögler portrait from Meyers Blitz-Lexikon 1932

Albert Vögler

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German politician, industrialist and entrepreneur.

German politician, industrialist and entrepreneur.

Vögler portrait from Meyers Blitz-Lexikon 1932

He was president of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society (later Max Planck Society) from 1941 until his death in 1945.

Otto Heinrich Warburg

Otto Heinrich Warburg

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German physiologist, medical doctor, and Nobel laureate.

German physiologist, medical doctor, and Nobel laureate.

Otto Heinrich Warburg
Otto H. Warburg, 1931
Dr. Otto Warburg (extreme left) at the National Institute of Health, USA
Warburg's grave in Berlin, Cemetery Dahlem

In 1918, Warburg was appointed professor at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Biology in Berlin-Dahlem (part of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gesellschaft).

By 1931 he was named director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Cell Physiology, which had been founded the previous year by a donation of the Rockefeller Foundation to the Kaiser Wilhelm Gesellschaft (since renamed the Max Planck Society).