USS Bunker Hill (CV-17), an aircraft carrier, was hit by two kamikazes on 11 May 1945, resulting in 389 personnel dead or missing and 264 wounded.
A Kaiten, Type 1, at the Tokyo Yasukuni War Memorial Museum
The Mongol fleet destroyed in a typhoon, by Kikuchi Yōsai, 1847
Kaiten Type 1 periscope at the Tokyo Yasukuni War Memorial
Lt. Yoshinori Yamaguchi's Yokosuka D4Y3 (Type 33 Suisei) "Judy" in a suicide dive against USS Essex (CV-9) on 25 November 1944. The attack left 15 killed and 44 wounded. The dive brakes are extended and the non-self-sealing port wing tank trails fuel vapor and/or smoke.
Map of known Kaiten base locations at the end of World War II
Model 52c Zeros ready to take part in a kamikaze attack (early 1945)
A Kaiten Type 1 being trial-launched from the light cruiser Kitakami
A kamikaze aircraft explodes after crashing into Essex flight deck amidships 25 November 1944.
Schematic of a Kaiten type 1
Rear Admiral Masafumi Arima
A Kaiten Type I at the Tokyo Yasukuni War Memorial Museum
26 May 1945. Corporal Yukio Araki, holding a puppy, with four other pilots of the 72nd Shinbu Squadron at Bansei, Kagoshima. Araki died the following day, at the age of 17, in a suicide attack on ships near Okinawa.
Schematic of a Kaiten type 2
St Lo attacked by kamikazes, 25 October 1944
Inside the hydrogen peroxide chamber of a type 2 Kaiten
Starboard horizontal stabilizer from the tail of a "Judy" on the deck of USS Kitkun Bay (CVE-71). The "Judy" made a run on the ship approaching from dead astern; it was met by effective fire and the aircraft passed over the island and exploded. Parts of the aircraft and the pilot were scattered over the flight deck and the forecastle.
Schematic of a Kaiten type 4
An A6M Zero (A6M2 Model 21) towards the end of its run at the escort carrier USS White Plains (CVE-66) on 25 October 1944. The aircraft exploded in mid-air moments after the picture was taken, scattering debris across the deck.
Schematic of a Kaiten type 10
An A6M5 "Zero" diving towards American ships in the Philippines in early 1945
A kaiten type 10 on display at the Yamato Museum
USS Louisville (CA-28) is struck by a Mitsubishi Ki-51 kamikaze at the Battle of Lingayen Gulf, 6 January 1945.
USS Mississinewa (AO-59), victim of a kaiten attack on 20 November 1944
USS Missouri (BB-63) shortly before being hit by a Mitsubishi A6M Zero (visible top left), 11 April 1945
USS Underhill
Aircraft carrier after being struck by a kamikaze off the Sakishima Islands. The kamikaze made a dent 3 m long and 0.6 m wide and deep in the armored flight deck. Eight crew members were killed, forty-seven were wounded, and 11 aircraft were destroyed.
Submarine I-47 as Kikusui group on 8 November 1944
Ugaki, shortly before taking off in a Yokosuka D4Y3 to participate in one of the final kamikaze strikes, 15 August 1945
Submarine I-56 as Kongō group on 21 December 1944
A crewman in an AA gun aboard the battleship USS New Jersey (BB-62) watches a kamikaze aircraft dive at USS Intrepid (CV-11) 25 November 1944. Over 75 men were killed or missing and 100 wounded.
Submarine I-47 as Kongō group on 25 December 1944
Japanese Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka ("cherry blossom"), a specially built rocket-powered kamikaze aircraft used towards the end of the war. The U.S. called them Baka Bombs ("idiot bombs").
Submarine I-48 as Kongō group on 1 January 1945
First recruits for Japanese Kamikaze suicide pilots in 1944
Submarine I-370 as Chihaya group on 21 February 1945
Chiran high school girls wave farewell with cherry blossom branches to departing kamikaze pilot in a Nakajima Ki-43-IIIa Hayabusa.
Submarine I-44 as Tatara group on 3 April 1945
Submarine I-36 as Tembu group
Submarine I-47 as Tembu group on 20 April 1945
Submarine I-367 as Simbu group on 2 May 1945
Submarine I-361 as Todoroki group on 23 May 1945
Submarine I-165 as Todoroki group on 15 June 1945
Submarine I-367 as Tamon group on 19 July 1945
Submarine I-363 as Tamon group in August 1945
Light cruiser Kitakami on 20 January 1945 at Sasebo Naval Arsenal
Kaiten Type 1 being trial launched from the light cruiser Kitakami (port)
Type D destroyers on 11 September 1945 at Kure Naval Base

For the Navy, this meant Kamikaze planes, Shinyo suicide boats, Kaiten submarines, and Fukuryu suicide divers or human mines.

- Kaiten

In addition to kamikazes, the Japanese military also used or made plans for non-aerial Japanese Special Attack Units, including those involving Kairyu (submarines), Kaiten human torpedoes, Shinyo speedboats and Fukuryu divers.

- Kamikaze
USS Bunker Hill (CV-17), an aircraft carrier, was hit by two kamikazes on 11 May 1945, resulting in 389 personnel dead or missing and 264 wounded.

4 related topics

Alpha

USS Port Royal (CG-73), a guided missile cruiser, launched in 1992

Cruiser

Type of warship.

Type of warship.

USS Port Royal (CG-73), a guided missile cruiser, launched in 1992
Russian Varyag in the Pacific Ocean
, the Royal Navy's first armored cruiser.
The Russian protected cruiser
HMS Lion (1910)
, a World War I era light cruiser, served as a headquarters and training vessel in Belfast until 2011.
Romanian coastguard cruiser Grivița
Italian cruiser.
USS Atlanta (CL-51).
Russian Navy battlecruiser of the ,
China's latest Type 055 destroyer has been classified by the United States Department of Defense as a cruiser because of its large size and armament.
One cruiser alternative studied in the late 1980s by the United States was variously entitled a Mission Essential Unit (MEU) or CG V/STOL.
of the French Navy, launched in 1961, decommissioned in 2010

In 1944 Kitakami was further converted to carry up to eight Kaiten human torpedoes in place of ordinary torpedoes.

The biggest guns in the American force were 5 in/38 caliber guns, while the Japanese had 14 in, 16 in, and 18.1 in guns. Aircraft from six additional escort carriers also participated for a total of around 330 US aircraft, a mix of F6F Hellcat fighters and TBF Avenger torpedo bombers. The Japanese had four battleships including Yamato, six heavy cruisers, two small light cruisers, and 11 destroyers. The Japanese force had earlier been driven off by air attack, losing Yamatos sister . Admiral Halsey then decided to use his Third Fleet carrier force to attack the Japanese carrier group, located well to the north of Samar, which was actually a decoy group with few aircraft. The Japanese were desperately short of aircraft and pilots at this point in the war, and Leyte Gulf was the first battle in which kamikaze attacks were used.

Ulithi atoll

Ulithi

Atoll in the Caroline Islands of the western Pacific Ocean, about 191 km east of Yap.

Atoll in the Caroline Islands of the western Pacific Ocean, about 191 km east of Yap.

Ulithi atoll
Map of Ulithi Atoll
Sketch by Walter Allan Finlayson: Officer's Hut on Mog Mog Island, ULITHI, May 1945 WWII
Sorlen Island and the north anchorage of Ulithi atoll, late 1944.
U.S. naval forces including carriers in the distance at anchor in Ulithi, March 1945
USS Iowa (BB-61) at a floating drydock at Ulithi
USS Mississinewa burns while sinking following an attack by Japanese kaiten.
USS Randolph undergoing repairs following a kamikaze attack at Ulithi
The first mail call in almost three months for Marine Aircraft Group 45., 1944
The musical group "Tune Toppers" performs on Ulithi, 1944.

On 20 November 1944 the Ulithi harbor was attacked by Japanese kaiten manned torpedoes launched from two nearby submarines.

On 11 March 1945, in a mission known as Operation Tan No. 2, several long range aircraft flying from southern Japan attempted a nighttime kamikaze attack on the naval base.

A Japanese Shinyo suicide motorboat, 1945

Shin'yō-class suicide motorboat

The Shinyo (震洋) were Japanese suicide motorboats developed during World War II.

The Shinyo (震洋) were Japanese suicide motorboats developed during World War II.

A Japanese Shinyo suicide motorboat, 1945

For the naval department this meant kamikaze planes, kaiten submarines, fukuryu suicide divers or human mines, and shinyo suicide boats.

USS Bunker Hill (CV-17) after a kamikaze attack by the Imperial Japanese Navy on May 11, 1945

Suicide attack

Any violent attack, usually entailing the attacker detonating an explosive, where the attacker has accepted their own death as a direct result of the attacking method used.

Any violent attack, usually entailing the attacker detonating an explosive, where the attacker has accepted their own death as a direct result of the attacking method used.

USS Bunker Hill (CV-17) after a kamikaze attack by the Imperial Japanese Navy on May 11, 1945
Several coordinated suicide attacks targeted the United States on September 11, 2001
The number of suicide attacks grew enormously after 2000.
Chinese suicide bomber putting on 24 hand grenade-explosive vest prior to attack on Japanese tanks at the Battle of Taierzhuang.
A Japanese Mitsubishi Zero's suicide attack on the USS Missouri (BB-63), April 11, 1945.
Kamikaze pilot about to miss crash diving into escort carrier USS White Plains (CVE-66).
The U.S. Embassy in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, in the aftermath of August 7, 1998, Al-Qaeda suicide bombing
Bus after 1996 Hamas bombing in Jerusalem
The result of a car bombing in Iraq
Afghanistan suicide bomb attacks, including non-detonated, 2002–2008
A female US Air Force officer playing the role of a suicide bomber during an exercise, 2011
Wreckage vehicles after a 2001 suicide bombing in Beit Lid Junction
Early Israeli construction of West Bank barrier in 2003

Suicide attacks have occurred throughout history, often as part of a military campaign (as with the Japanese kamikaze pilots of 1944–1945 during World War II), and more recently as part of terrorist campaigns (such as the September 11 attacks in 2001).

The Japanese Navy also used piloted torpedoes called kaiten ("Heaven shaker") on suicide missions.