Kali

Goddess KaliKālīKaaliMahankaliMaa KaliDakshina KaliKali MaKalikaBhadrakaaliBhavatarini
Kali (, काली, Bangla: কালী, ), also known as ' or ', is a Hindu goddess.wikipedia
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Shaktism

ShaktaSaktaSaktism
Kali is one of the ten Mahavidyas, a list which combines Sakta and Buddhist goddesses.
Shaktism has different sub-traditions, ranging from those focused on gracious Gauri to fierce Kali, and some Shakti sub-traditions associate their Goddess with Shiva or Brahma or Vishnu.

Kaula (Hinduism)

KaulaKulamārgaKula
She is the most powerful form of Shakti, and the goddess of one of the four subcategories of the Kulamārga, a category of tantric Saivism.
It is subdivided into four subcategories of texts based on the goddesses Kuleśvarī, Kubjikā, Kālī and Tripurasundarī respectively.

Hinduism

HinduHindusHindu culture
Kali (, काली, Bangla: কালী, ), also known as ' or ', is a Hindu goddess.
Devi is depicted as in gentler forms like Parvati, the consort of Shiva; or, as fierce warrior goddesses like Kali and Durga.

Durga

MahishasuramardiniGoddess DurgaMahishamardini
Chanda and Munda attack the goddess Durga. In Kāli's most famous legend, Durga and her assistants, the Matrikas, wound the demon Raktabija, in various ways and with a variety of weapons in an attempt to destroy him.
Of these, Chandika has two forms called Chandi who is of the combined power and form of Saraswati, Lakshmi and Parvati and of Chamunda who is a form of Kali created by the goddess for killing demons Chanda and Munda.

Mundamala

garland of skullsgarland of human headsgarland of human skulls
Kali's appearance is dark blue, gaunt with sunken eyes, and wearing a tiger skin and a garland of human heads.
Kali, the foremost Mahavidya, often wears a garland of freshly severed heads.

Raktabīja

RaktabijaRaktavijaancient demon from Indian legend
Later in the same battle, the demon Raktabija is undefeated because of his ability to reproduce himself from every drop of his blood that reaches the ground. In Kāli's most famous legend, Durga and her assistants, the Matrikas, wound the demon Raktabija, in various ways and with a variety of weapons in an attempt to destroy him.
In Hindu mythology, Raktabīja was an asura (loosely translated as demon) who fought with Shumbha and Nishumbha against Goddess Parvati and Goddess Kali or Goddess Chamunda.

Ramakrishna

Sri RamakrishnaRamakrishna ParamahamsaRamakrishna Paramhansa
When the Bengali saint Ramakrishna once asked a devotee why one would prefer to worship Mother over him, this devotee rhetorically replied, "Maharaj, when they are in trouble your devotees come running to you. But, where do you run when you are in trouble?"
Ramakrishna experienced spiritual ecstasies from a young age, and was influenced by several religious traditions, including devotion toward the goddess Kali, Tantra (shakta), Vaishnava (bhakti), and Advaita Vedanta.

Chamunda

ChamundiChamundeshwariChamunda Devi
She is given the epithet (Chamunda), i.e. the slayer of the demons Chanda and Munda.
She is closely associated with Kali, another fierce aspect of Parvati.

Goddess

goddessessacred femininefemale deity
Kali (, काली, Bangla: কালী, ), also known as ' or ', is a Hindu goddess.
Shiva likewise pairs with Parvati who later is represented through a number of Avatars (incarnations): Sati and the warrior figures, Durga and Kali.

Adi Parashakti

AdishaktiDivine MotherAdi Parasakthi
Over time, Kali has been worshipped by devotional movements and tantric sects variously as the Divine Mother, Mother of the Universe, Adi Shakti, or Adi Parashakti.
In her gentle, loving, and motherly form, she is Lalita, Parvati, Lakshmi, saraswati, Gauri and so on; Goddess Kali, Durga and Goddess Chandi in her wrathful form.

Shakti

Adi ShaktiShakthiŚakti
She is the most powerful form of Shakti, and the goddess of one of the four subcategories of the Kulamārga, a category of tantric Saivism.

Shiva

Lord ShivaSivaLord Siva
Kali is often portrayed standing or dancing on her consort, the Hindu god Shiva, who lies calm and prostrate beneath her. Although Parvati is often said to be the recipient and student of Shiva's wisdom in the form of Tantras, it is Kali who seems to dominate much of the Tantric iconography, texts, and rituals.
She is identified with Devi, the Divine Mother; Shakti (divine energy) as well as goddesses like Tripura Sundari, Durga, Kali, Kamakshi and Minakshi.

Ramprasad Sen

RamprasadSen RamprasadRāmprasād Sen
There are many different interpretations of the pose held by Dakshinakali, including those of the 18th and 19th-century bhakti poet-devotees such as Ramprasad Sen.
His bhakti poems, known as Ramprasadi, are still popular in Bengal—they are usually addressed to the Hindu goddess Kali and written in Bengali.

Tantra

TantricTantrismTantrik
She is the most powerful form of Shakti, and the goddess of one of the four subcategories of the Kulamārga, a category of tantric Saivism.
The mantra and yantra are instruments to invoke higher qualities, often associated with specific Hindu deities such as Shiva, Shakti, or Kali.

Matrikas

MatrikaSaptamatrikaSaptamatrikas
In Kāli's most famous legend, Durga and her assistants, the Matrikas, wound the demon Raktabija, in various ways and with a variety of weapons in an attempt to destroy him.
In this version, Kali is described as a Matrika, who sucked all the blood of demon Raktabija.

Devi Mahatmya

Devi MahatmyamDurga SaptashatiChandi
Her most well-known appearance on the battlefield is in the sixth century Devi Mahatmyam. The deity of the first chapter of Devi Mahatmyam is Mahakali, who appears from the body of sleeping Vishnu as goddess Yoga Nidra to wake him up in order to protect Brahma and the World from two demons Madhu and Kaitabha.
Among the important goddess forms the Devi Mahatmyam introduced into the Sanskritic mainstream are Kali and the Sapta-Matrika ("Seven Mothers").

Kapala

skullcupskull-cupkapāla
Kali's most common four armed iconographic image shows each hand carrying variously a sword, a trishul (trident), a severed head, and a bowl or skull-cup (kapala) catching the blood of the severed head.
Hindu deities that may be depicted with the kapala include Durga, Kālī and Shiva, especially in his Bhairava form.

Bhadrakali

BadrakaliBhadraBhadrakālī
The closest way of direct worship is Maha Kali or Bhadrakali (Bhadra in Sanskrit means 'gentle').
Bhadrakali is a popular form of the Great Goddess, worshipped in Kerala as Bhadrakali, Mahakali, Chamunda and Kariam Kali Murti.

Kali Puja

Kaali PujaShyama PujaKalipuja
Kāli is especially venerated in the festival of Kali Puja in eastern India – celebrated when the new moon day of Ashwin month coincides with the festival of Diwali.
Kali Puja, also known as Shyama Puja or Mahanisha Puja, is a festival, originating from the Indian subcontinent, dedicated to the Hindu goddess Kali, celebrated on the new moon day of the Hindu month Kartik especially in the regions of Bengal, Chittagong, Sylhet, Rangpur, Bihar, Mithila, Odisha, Assam, and the town of Titwala in Maharashtra.

Parvati

ParvathiUmaGoddess Parvati
Although Parvati is often said to be the recipient and student of Shiva's wisdom in the form of Tantras, it is Kali who seems to dominate much of the Tantric iconography, texts, and rituals.
The apparent contradiction that Parvati is addressed as the golden one, Gauri, as well as the dark one, Kali or Shyama, as a calm and placid wife Parvati mentioned as Gauri and as a goddess who destroys evil she is Kali.

Diwali

DeepavaliDeepawaliDipawali
Kāli is especially venerated in the festival of Kali Puja in eastern India – celebrated when the new moon day of Ashwin month coincides with the festival of Diwali.
The festival is widely associated with Lakshmi, goddess of prosperity, but regional traditions connect it to Sita and Rama, Vishnu, Krishna, Durga, Kali, Dhanvantari, or Vishvakarman.

Dakini

DakinisḍākinīDakiniten
Tantric Kali cults such as the Kaula and Krama had a strong influence on Tantric Buddhism, as can be seen in fierce looking yoginis and dakinis such as Vajrayogini and "Krodikali".
The ḍākinī (and the ḍāka) appeared in medieval legends in India (such as in the Bhagavata Purana, Brahma Purana, Markandeya Purana and Kathasaritsagara) as a demon in the train of Kali who feeds on human flesh.

Shyama Sangeet

ShyamasangeetShyamasangit
A significant portion of Bengali devotional music features Kāli as its central theme and is known as Shyama Sangeet ("Music of the Night").
Shyama Sangeet is a genre of Bengali devotional songs dedicated to the Hindu goddess Shyama or Kali which is a form of supreme universal mother-goddess Durga or parvati.

Krishnananda Agamavagisha

The growing popularity of worship of a more benign form of Kali, as Dakshinakali, is often attributed to Krishnananda Agamavagisha.
The development of worship of the form of Goddess Kali as Dakshinakali, is also often attributed to Krishnananda Agamavagisha.

Vajrayogini

VajrayoginīVajra YoginiVajrayogini Hall
Tantric Kali cults such as the Kaula and Krama had a strong influence on Tantric Buddhism, as can be seen in fierce looking yoginis and dakinis such as Vajrayogini and "Krodikali".
Her extended right leg treads on the chest of red Kālarātri, while her bent left leg treads on the forehead of black Bhairava, bending his head backward and pressing it into his back at the level of his heart.