A report on Kamikaze

USS Bunker Hill (CV-17), an aircraft carrier, was hit by two kamikazes on 11 May 1945, resulting in 389 personnel dead or missing and 264 wounded.
The Mongol fleet destroyed in a typhoon, by Kikuchi Yōsai, 1847
Lt. Yoshinori Yamaguchi's Yokosuka D4Y3 (Type 33 Suisei) "Judy" in a suicide dive against USS Essex (CV-9) on 25 November 1944. The attack left 15 killed and 44 wounded. The dive brakes are extended and the non-self-sealing port wing tank trails fuel vapor and/or smoke.
Model 52c Zeros ready to take part in a kamikaze attack (early 1945)
A kamikaze aircraft explodes after crashing into Essex flight deck amidships 25 November 1944.
Rear Admiral Masafumi Arima
26 May 1945. Corporal Yukio Araki, holding a puppy, with four other pilots of the 72nd Shinbu Squadron at Bansei, Kagoshima. Araki died the following day, at the age of 17, in a suicide attack on ships near Okinawa.
St Lo attacked by kamikazes, 25 October 1944
Starboard horizontal stabilizer from the tail of a "Judy" on the deck of USS Kitkun Bay (CVE-71). The "Judy" made a run on the ship approaching from dead astern; it was met by effective fire and the aircraft passed over the island and exploded. Parts of the aircraft and the pilot were scattered over the flight deck and the forecastle.
An A6M Zero (A6M2 Model 21) towards the end of its run at the escort carrier USS White Plains (CVE-66) on 25 October 1944. The aircraft exploded in mid-air moments after the picture was taken, scattering debris across the deck.
An A6M5 "Zero" diving towards American ships in the Philippines in early 1945
USS Louisville (CA-28) is struck by a Mitsubishi Ki-51 kamikaze at the Battle of Lingayen Gulf, 6 January 1945.
USS Missouri (BB-63) shortly before being hit by a Mitsubishi A6M Zero (visible top left), 11 April 1945
Aircraft carrier after being struck by a kamikaze off the Sakishima Islands. The kamikaze made a dent 3 m long and 0.6 m wide and deep in the armored flight deck. Eight crew members were killed, forty-seven were wounded, and 11 aircraft were destroyed.
Ugaki, shortly before taking off in a Yokosuka D4Y3 to participate in one of the final kamikaze strikes, 15 August 1945
A crewman in an AA gun aboard the battleship USS New Jersey (BB-62) watches a kamikaze aircraft dive at USS Intrepid (CV-11) 25 November 1944. Over 75 men were killed or missing and 100 wounded.
Japanese Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka ("cherry blossom"), a specially built rocket-powered kamikaze aircraft used towards the end of the war. The U.S. called them Baka Bombs ("idiot bombs").
First recruits for Japanese Kamikaze suicide pilots in 1944
Chiran high school girls wave farewell with cherry blossom branches to departing kamikaze pilot in a Nakajima Ki-43-IIIa Hayabusa.
Kamikaze damage to the destroyer USS Newcomb (DD-586) following action off Okinawa, Newcomb was damaged beyond economical repair and scrapped after the war.

Kamikaze, officially Shinpū Tokubetsu Kōgekitai (神風特別攻撃隊), were a part of the Japanese Special Attack Units of military aviators who flew suicide attacks for the Empire of Japan against Allied naval vessels in the closing stages of the Pacific campaign of World War II, intending to destroy warships more effectively than with conventional air attacks.

- Kamikaze
USS Bunker Hill (CV-17), an aircraft carrier, was hit by two kamikazes on 11 May 1945, resulting in 389 personnel dead or missing and 264 wounded.

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Mitsubishi Ki-51

Mitsubishi Ki-51

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Light bomber/dive bomber in service with the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II.

Light bomber/dive bomber in service with the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II.

Mitsubishi Ki-51
Mitsubishi Ki-51
3-view drawing of the Mitsubishi Ki-51
After the end of World War 2, Mitsubishi Ki-51 Type 99 attack planes and reconnaissance aircraft accumulated at Keijo New Airfield (Gimpo) in Seoul.

As the war drew to a close, the Japanese began using them in kamikaze attacks.

A Seafire XV in Royal Canadian Navy service

Supermarine Seafire

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Naval version of the Supermarine Spitfire adapted for operation from aircraft carriers.

Naval version of the Supermarine Spitfire adapted for operation from aircraft carriers.

A Seafire XV in Royal Canadian Navy service
A Seafire XV in Royal Canadian Navy service
Seafire during Fleet Air Arm trials aboard HMS Victorious, 23–25 September 1942
A Seafire Mk IIc on the flight deck of HMS Formidable, December 1942
Operational Seafire F Mk XVIIs of No. 1831 Squadron RNVR at RNAS Stretton in 1950
A Seafire F Mk 47 on board HMS Unicorn at Kure, Hiroshima, Japan, 1950
Preserved Seafire SX336 F Mk XVII displays at the Cotswold Air Show, 2010
Preserved Seafire SX336 F Mk XVII taxis at the Cotswold Air Show, 2010
Multiple aircraft, including Seafires, stowed in a hangar on board HMS Argus
Seafire F.XVII SX336. Note the folded wings in order to reduce its storage space
Operational Seafire F.47s of 1833 Squadron RNVR in May 1953
A Seafire being brought up to the flight deck of
Seafire F.46

During the latter half of 1944, the Seafire became a part of the aerial component of the British Pacific Fleet, where it quickly proved to be a capable interceptor against the feared kamikaze attacks by Japanese pilots which had become increasingly common during the final years of the Pacific War.

A U.S. 37 mm M3 anti-tank gun fires against Japanese cave positions in the north face of Mount Suribachi.

Battle of Iwo Jima

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Major battle in which the United States Marine Corps (USMC) and United States Navy (USN) landed on and eventually captured the island of Iwo Jima from the Imperial Japanese Army (IJA) during World War II.

Major battle in which the United States Marine Corps (USMC) and United States Navy (USN) landed on and eventually captured the island of Iwo Jima from the Imperial Japanese Army (IJA) during World War II.

A U.S. 37 mm M3 anti-tank gun fires against Japanese cave positions in the north face of Mount Suribachi.
Location of Iwo Jima
Lieut. Gen. Tadamichi Kuribayashi
The battleship USS New York (BB-34) firing its 14 in main guns on the island, 16 February 1945 (D minus 3)
LVTs approach Iwo Jima.
19 February 1945 air view of southern part of Iwo Jima
19 February 1945 air view of Marines landing on the beach
19 February 1945 air view of Marines landing on the beach
Marines landing on the beach
U.S. Army Soldiers engaging heavily fortified Japanese positions
U.S. Marines of the Second Battalion, Twenty-Seventh Regiment, wait to move inland on Iwo Jima, soon after going ashore on 19 February 1945. An LVT(A)-5 amphibious tractor is in the background. Red Beach One.
Members of the 1st Battalion 23rd Marines burrow in the volcanic sand on Yellow Beach 1. A beached LCI is visible upper left with Mount Suribachi upper right.
U.S. Marines (Left to Right), PFC. J. L. Hudson Jr. Pvt. K.L. Lofter, PFC. Paul V.Parces, (top of blockhouse), Pvt. Fred Sizemore, PFC. Henrey Noviech and Pvt. Richard N. Pearson pose with a captured Japanese flag on top of enemy pillbox.
Culvert serves as command post for 23d Marine Regiment on Iwo Jima
U.S. flag over Mount Suribachi
U.S. postage stamp, 1945 issue, commemorating the Battle of Iwo Jima
Sketch of Hill 362A, made by the 31st U.S. Naval Construction Battalion. Dotted lines show the Japanese tunnel system.
A U.S. Marine firing his Browning M1917 machine gun at the Japanese
Two Marines using a "Hotch Kiss" from the Japanese, 1945
A flamethrower operator of E Company, 2nd Battalion 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division, runs under fire on Iwo Jima.
The CB-H2 flamethrower seen here on Iwo Jima had a range of 150 yards
Lieutenant Wade discusses the overall importance of the target at a pre-invasion briefing.
American supplies being landed at Iwo Jima
Marines from the 24th Marine Regiment during the Battle of Iwo Jima
Harry Truman congratulates Marine Corporal Hershel Williams of the Third Marine Division on being awarded the Medal of Honor, 5 October 1945.
The U.S. Marine Corps War Memorial in Arlington with the Washington Monument and the United States Capitol in the distance.
Iwo Jima cemetery entrances built by the 133rd Seabees, with the 3rd Marine Division foreward and the 4th Marine Division opposite.
Internments of the 4th Marine Division.
4th USMC Division Cemetery Iwo Jima
5th USMC Division Cemetery entrance built by the 31st CB with Mt. Suribachi center.
The memorial on top of Suribachi
The 60th anniversary reunion at the Japanese part of the memorial
The 67th anniversary ceremony sponsored by the U.S. Marine Corps, the government of Japan, and the Iwo Jima Associations of America and Japan
Commencement of the 71st commemoration of the anniversary
U.S. and Japanese color guard teams stand at attention during the 72nd Reunion of Honor ceremony.

He also received a handful of kamikaze pilots to use against the enemy fleet; their attacks during the battle killed 318 American sailors.

Dechaineux

Emile Dechaineux

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Australian mariner who reached the rank of Captain in the Royal Australian Navy during World War II.

Australian mariner who reached the rank of Captain in the Royal Australian Navy during World War II.

Dechaineux
Dechaineux (second right) on the bridge of HMAS Australia in September 1944.
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He was killed by a Japanese aircraft in what is believed to have been the first ever kamikaze attack, in the lead-up to the Battle of Leyte Gulf.

Vice Admiral Ugaki Matome (1942-45)

Matome Ugaki

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Vice Admiral Ugaki Matome (1942-45)
Ugaki as captain 1932-38.
Yamamoto (left) and Ugaki in 1941.
Ugaki on 15 August 1945 before his final kamikaze mission.

Matome Ugaki (宇垣 纏) was an admiral in the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II, remembered for his extensive and revealing war diary, role at the Battle of Leyte Gulf, and kamikaze suicide hours after the announced surrender of Japan at the end of the war.

Captain John Collins in 1943

John Augustine Collins

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Royal Australian Navy (RAN) officer who served in both World Wars, and who eventually rose to become a vice admiral and Chief of Naval Staff.

Royal Australian Navy (RAN) officer who served in both World Wars, and who eventually rose to become a vice admiral and Chief of Naval Staff.

Captain John Collins in 1943
Members of the Australian Mission Group at the Japanese surrender talks. Left to right: Commodore John Collins; Lieutenant General Frank Berryman; Captain Roy Dowling; Air Commodore Raymond Brownell.

He led the Australian Naval Squadron in the Pacific theatre and was wounded in the first recorded kamikaze attack, in 1944.

Nakajima Ki-115

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A Ki-115 shortly after the war. Propellers were removed to prevent flight.
Ki-115 in USAF markings at Yokota Air Base

The Nakajima Ki-115 Tsurugi (剣) was a one-man kamikaze aircraft developed by the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force in the closing stages of World War II in 1945.

A diagram of the big blue blanket. American picket warships (destroyers) would use radar to detect incoming Japanese aircraft. They would then radio the position and course of the incoming aircraft to American fighters of the combat air patrol circling the main American fleet. Those fighters would then intercept the incoming Japanese aircraft long before they could attack the main American ships (carriers).

Big blue blanket

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A diagram of the big blue blanket. American picket warships (destroyers) would use radar to detect incoming Japanese aircraft. They would then radio the position and course of the incoming aircraft to American fighters of the combat air patrol circling the main American fleet. Those fighters would then intercept the incoming Japanese aircraft long before they could attack the main American ships (carriers).
The Big blue blanket system was devised by John Thach, who had earlier developed his namesake Thach Weave.

The big blue blanket was an air defense system devised by John Thach during World War II for protecting American warships from attack by Japanese kamikazes.

USS Port Royal (CG-73), a guided missile cruiser, launched in 1992

Cruiser

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Type of warship.

Type of warship.

USS Port Royal (CG-73), a guided missile cruiser, launched in 1992
Russian Varyag in the Pacific Ocean
, the Royal Navy's first armored cruiser.
The Russian protected cruiser
HMS Lion (1910)
, a World War I era light cruiser, served as a headquarters and training vessel in Belfast until 2011.
Romanian coastguard cruiser Grivița
Italian cruiser.
USS Atlanta (CL-51).
Russian Navy battlecruiser of the ,
China's latest Type 055 destroyer has been classified by the United States Department of Defense as a cruiser because of its large size and armament.
One cruiser alternative studied in the late 1980s by the United States was variously entitled a Mission Essential Unit (MEU) or CG V/STOL.
of the French Navy, launched in 1961, decommissioned in 2010

The biggest guns in the American force were 5 in/38 caliber guns, while the Japanese had 14 in, 16 in, and 18.1 in guns. Aircraft from six additional escort carriers also participated for a total of around 330 US aircraft, a mix of F6F Hellcat fighters and TBF Avenger torpedo bombers. The Japanese had four battleships including Yamato, six heavy cruisers, two small light cruisers, and 11 destroyers. The Japanese force had earlier been driven off by air attack, losing Yamatos sister . Admiral Halsey then decided to use his Third Fleet carrier force to attack the Japanese carrier group, located well to the north of Samar, which was actually a decoy group with few aircraft. The Japanese were desperately short of aircraft and pilots at this point in the war, and Leyte Gulf was the first battle in which kamikaze attacks were used.

A profile of the design of USS Takanis Bay (CVE-89), which was shared with all Casablanca-class escort carriers.

USS Bismarck Sea

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The fortieth of fifty s built to serve the United States Navy during World War II; she was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the Battle of the Bismarck Sea.

The fortieth of fifty s built to serve the United States Navy during World War II; she was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the Battle of the Bismarck Sea.

A profile of the design of USS Takanis Bay (CVE-89), which was shared with all Casablanca-class escort carriers.
Bismarck Sea photographed in Majuro Atoll, July 1944.
An FM2 (N-27) either missed or broke an arresting hook and crashed into planes parked on the bow, 19 December 1944
Lunga Point burning from the third kamikaze, on 21 February 1945, which sparked a brief gasoline fire. The damage sustained by Lunga Point proved to be minimal.
Bismarck Sea exploding after being hit by a kamikaze, photographed from USS Saginaw Bay (CVE-82)

On 21 February 1945, she sank off of Iwo Jima due to two Japanese kamikaze attacks, killing 318 crewmen.