A report on Kamikaze

USS Bunker Hill (CV-17), an aircraft carrier, was hit by two kamikazes on 11 May 1945, resulting in 389 personnel dead or missing and 264 wounded.
The Mongol fleet destroyed in a typhoon, by Kikuchi Yōsai, 1847
Lt. Yoshinori Yamaguchi's Yokosuka D4Y3 (Type 33 Suisei) "Judy" in a suicide dive against USS Essex (CV-9) on 25 November 1944. The attack left 15 killed and 44 wounded. The dive brakes are extended and the non-self-sealing port wing tank trails fuel vapor and/or smoke.
Model 52c Zeros ready to take part in a kamikaze attack (early 1945)
A kamikaze aircraft explodes after crashing into Essex flight deck amidships 25 November 1944.
Rear Admiral Masafumi Arima
26 May 1945. Corporal Yukio Araki, holding a puppy, with four other pilots of the 72nd Shinbu Squadron at Bansei, Kagoshima. Araki died the following day, at the age of 17, in a suicide attack on ships near Okinawa.
St Lo attacked by kamikazes, 25 October 1944
Starboard horizontal stabilizer from the tail of a "Judy" on the deck of USS Kitkun Bay (CVE-71). The "Judy" made a run on the ship approaching from dead astern; it was met by effective fire and the aircraft passed over the island and exploded. Parts of the aircraft and the pilot were scattered over the flight deck and the forecastle.
An A6M Zero (A6M2 Model 21) towards the end of its run at the escort carrier USS White Plains (CVE-66) on 25 October 1944. The aircraft exploded in mid-air moments after the picture was taken, scattering debris across the deck.
An A6M5 "Zero" diving towards American ships in the Philippines in early 1945
USS Louisville (CA-28) is struck by a Mitsubishi Ki-51 kamikaze at the Battle of Lingayen Gulf, 6 January 1945.
USS Missouri (BB-63) shortly before being hit by a Mitsubishi A6M Zero (visible top left), 11 April 1945
Aircraft carrier after being struck by a kamikaze off the Sakishima Islands. The kamikaze made a dent 3 m long and 0.6 m wide and deep in the armored flight deck. Eight crew members were killed, forty-seven were wounded, and 11 aircraft were destroyed.
Ugaki, shortly before taking off in a Yokosuka D4Y3 to participate in one of the final kamikaze strikes, 15 August 1945
A crewman in an AA gun aboard the battleship USS New Jersey (BB-62) watches a kamikaze aircraft dive at USS Intrepid (CV-11) 25 November 1944. Over 75 men were killed or missing and 100 wounded.
Japanese Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka ("cherry blossom"), a specially built rocket-powered kamikaze aircraft used towards the end of the war. The U.S. called them Baka Bombs ("idiot bombs").
First recruits for Japanese Kamikaze suicide pilots in 1944
Chiran high school girls wave farewell with cherry blossom branches to departing kamikaze pilot in a Nakajima Ki-43-IIIa Hayabusa.
Kamikaze damage to the destroyer USS Newcomb (DD-586) following action off Okinawa, Newcomb was damaged beyond economical repair and scrapped after the war.

Kamikaze, officially Shinpū Tokubetsu Kōgekitai (神風特別攻撃隊), were a part of the Japanese Special Attack Units of military aviators who flew suicide attacks for the Empire of Japan against Allied naval vessels in the closing stages of the Pacific campaign of World War II, intending to destroy warships more effectively than with conventional air attacks.

- Kamikaze
USS Bunker Hill (CV-17), an aircraft carrier, was hit by two kamikazes on 11 May 1945, resulting in 389 personnel dead or missing and 264 wounded.

81 related topics with Alpha

Overall

B6N2 in flight

Nakajima B6N

1 links

The Imperial Japanese Navy's standard carrier-borne torpedo bomber during the final years of World War II and the successor to the B5N "Kate".

The Imperial Japanese Navy's standard carrier-borne torpedo bomber during the final years of World War II and the successor to the B5N "Kate".

B6N2 in flight
B6N2 in flight
A B6N2 before starting the engine.
A B6N explodes after a hit by a 5-inch shell from USS Yorktown as it attempts an unsuccessful attack on the carrier off Kwajalein on 4 December 1943.
B6N torpedo bomber attacking TG38.3 during the Formosa Air Battle, October 1944
Nakajima B6N2 "Tenzan" as 752nd Kōkūtai flying in formation (note aircraft numbers on hinomaru).
Nakajima B6N2 "Tenzan" unit before take-off.
A B6N2 is tested by US Navy personnel of the TAIU-SWPA (Technical Air Intelligence Unit-South-West Pacific Area) over Clark Field, Luzon at the end of the war.

The planes were extensively used in the Battle of Okinawa where they were also used for kamikaze missions for the first time.

SBD bombers on Santee during convoy duty in the Atlantic.

USS Santee (CVE-29)

2 links

American escort carrier.

American escort carrier.

SBD bombers on Santee during convoy duty in the Atlantic.
An FM-2 flying over Santee in October 1944.

At 07:40, a kamikaze – carrying what was estimated to be a 138 lb bomb – crashed through the flight deck and damaged the hangar deck.

The carrier (center) and two destroyers under attack by U.S. Navy carrier aircraft, June 20, 1944

Battle of the Philippine Sea

2 links

Major naval battle of World War II that eliminated the Imperial Japanese Navy's ability to conduct large-scale carrier actions.

Major naval battle of World War II that eliminated the Imperial Japanese Navy's ability to conduct large-scale carrier actions.

The carrier (center) and two destroyers under attack by U.S. Navy carrier aircraft, June 20, 1944
F6F-3 landing aboard Lexington, flagship of Task Force 58
Map of the Battle of the Philippine Sea
Fighter aircraft contrails mark the sky over Task Force 58, June 19, 1944
USS Bunker Hill (CV-17) is nearly hit by a Japanese bomb during the air attacks of June 19, 1944.
Lt. Alexander Vraciu downed six Japanese dive bombers in a single mission, June 19, 1944.
Japanese aircraft carrier Taihō
USS Albacore
Japanese aircraft carrier Shōkaku
USS Cavalla
Japanese Carrier Division Three under attack by United States Navy aircraft from Task Force 58, late afternoon, June 20, 1944. The heavy cruiser circling at right, nearest to the camera, is either or . Beyond that is the small aircraft carrier.

With the effective crippling of her best striking arm, Japan chose to rely increasingly on land-based kamikaze suicide aircraft in a last-ditch effort to make the war so costly that the U.S. would offer peace terms better than unconditional surrender.

A profile of the design of USS Takanis Bay (CVE-89), which was shared with all Casablanca-class escort carriers.

USS Ommaney Bay

0 links

Of the United States Navy, which served during World War II.

Of the United States Navy, which served during World War II.

A profile of the design of USS Takanis Bay (CVE-89), which was shared with all Casablanca-class escort carriers.
A Yokosuka P1Y kamikaze aircraft passing above Ommaney Bays flight deck.
Ommaney Bay under attack by kamikaze aircraft, 4 January 1945.
Ommaney Bay burning after the kamikaze attack.
Ommaney Bay engulfed in smoke and flames, a short while after the attack. Photographed from the battleship USS West Virginia (BB-48), the destroyer USS Patterson (DD-392) is depicted maneuvering into position, whilst attempting to combat the flames.

She was heavily damaged in a kamikaze attack and subsequently scuttled on 4 January 1945, with the loss of 95 men, including two men on board the destroyer escort USS Eichenberger (DE-202) who were killed by flying debris.

Nihon Shoki (720 AD), considered by historians and archaeologists as the most complete extant historical record of ancient Japan, was written entirely in kanji.

Kanji

0 links

Kanji (漢字) are the logographic Chinese characters taken from the Chinese script and used in the writing of Japanese.

Kanji (漢字) are the logographic Chinese characters taken from the Chinese script and used in the writing of Japanese.

Nihon Shoki (720 AD), considered by historians and archaeologists as the most complete extant historical record of ancient Japan, was written entirely in kanji.
A young woman practicing kanji. Ukiyo-e woodblock print by Yōshū Chikanobu, 1897.
A jūbako (重箱), which has a mixed on-kun reading
A yutō (湯桶), which has a mixed kun-on reading
An image that lists most joyo-kanji, according to Halpern's KKLD indexing system, with kyo-iku kanji color-coded by grade level

Examples include 手紙 tegami "letter", 日傘 higasa "parasol", and the famous 神風 kamikaze "divine wind".

Messerschmitt Me 163 Komet, the only operational rocket-powered fighter aircraft

Rocket-powered aircraft

1 links

Aircraft that uses a rocket engine for propulsion, sometimes in addition to airbreathing jet engines.

Aircraft that uses a rocket engine for propulsion, sometimes in addition to airbreathing jet engines.

Messerschmitt Me 163 Komet, the only operational rocket-powered fighter aircraft
Pedro Paulet's Avión Torpedo of 1902, featuring a canopy fixed to a delta tiltwing for horizontal or vertical flight.
Opel RAK.1 - World's first public manned flight of a rocket plane on September 30, 1929.
A Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka replica at the Yasukuni Shrine Yūshūkan war museum
The X-15's XLR99 rocket engine used ammonia and liquid oxygen.
The Lockheed NF-104A had rocket and air-breathing turbojet engines, shown here climbing with rocket power. The rocket used hydrogen peroxide and JP-4 jet fuel.
A SNCASO Trident on static display
The Martin Aircraft Company X-24 lifting body built as part of a 1963 to 1975 experimental US military program
EZ-Rocket research aircraft

The Japanese also produced approximately 850 Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka rocket-powered suicide attack aircraft during the Second World War, a number were deployed in the Battle of Okinawa.

A V2 launched from Test Stand VII in the summer of 1943

Missile

0 links

Guided airborne ranged weapon capable of self-propelled flight usually by a jet engine or rocket motor.

Guided airborne ranged weapon capable of self-propelled flight usually by a jet engine or rocket motor.

A V2 launched from Test Stand VII in the summer of 1943
HNLMS De Zeven Provinciën (F802) firing a Harpoon
V-1 missile
Missile Maintainer inspects missile guidance system of the LGM-30G Minuteman ICBM
A simplified diagram of a solid-fuel rocket.
An R-36 ballistic missile launch at a Soviet silo
American Tomahawk cruise missile
Russian-Indian Supersonic cruise missile BrahMos
The French Exocet missile in flight
U.S. Army soldiers firing an FGM-148 Javelin
MIM-104 Patriot missile being launched
Arrow missile
A F-22 Raptor fires an AIM-120 AMRAAM
ASM-135 ASAT missile launch in 1985

The US Navy also started missile research to deal with the Kamikaze threat.

Chiran Peace Museum for Kamikaze Pilots

Chiran Peace Museum for Kamikaze Pilots

1 links

Chiran Peace Museum for Kamikaze Pilots
Chiran school girls wave farewell to a departing pilot with branches of cherry blossoms
Ki-43 Hayabusa
Statue of a Kamikaze Pilot

The airbase at Chiran, Minamikyūshū, on the Satsuma Peninsula of Kagoshima, Japan, served as the departure point for hundreds of Special Attack or kamikaze sorties launched in the final months of World War II.

The Mongol fleet destroyed in a typhoon, ink and water on paper, by Kikuchi Yōsai, 1847

Kamikaze (typhoon)

1 links

The kamikaze (神風, ) were two winds or storms that are said to have saved Japan from two Mongol fleets under Kublai Khan.

The kamikaze (神風, ) were two winds or storms that are said to have saved Japan from two Mongol fleets under Kublai Khan.

The Mongol fleet destroyed in a typhoon, ink and water on paper, by Kikuchi Yōsai, 1847

The name given to the storm, kamikaze, was later used during World War II as nationalist propaganda for suicide attacks by Japanese pilots.

Mongol invasions of Japan in 1274 and 1281

Mongol invasions of Japan

1 links

Major military efforts were taken by Kublai Khan of the Yuan dynasty in 1274 and 1281 to conquer the Japanese archipelago after the submission of the Korean kingdom of Goryeo to vassaldom.

Major military efforts were taken by Kublai Khan of the Yuan dynasty in 1274 and 1281 to conquer the Japanese archipelago after the submission of the Korean kingdom of Goryeo to vassaldom.

Mongol invasions of Japan in 1274 and 1281
Mongol invasions of Japan in 1274 and 1281
Letter from Kublai Khan of the "Great Mongol State" (大蒙古國) to the "King of Japan" (日本國王), written in Classical Chinese, the lingua franca in East Asia at the time, dated 8th Month, 1266. Now stored in Tōdai-ji, Nara, Japan.
Two Samurai with a dead Mongol at their feet. The one on the right is possibly Sō Sukekuni, the defending commander at Tsushima. Votive image (ema) at the Komodahama Shrine at Sasuura on Tsushima.
Samurai Mitsui Sukenaga (right) defeating the Mongolian invasion army (left)
The Mongol fleet destroyed in a typhoon, ink and water on paper, by Kikuchi Yōsai, 1847
A stone defense wall (Genkō Bōrui) at Nishijin, near Seinan University. Currently, only the top of a few stone walls are exposed to the ground, and most of them have been reclaimed.
A stake driven into the mouth of a river to prevent the Mongol army from landing. It was excavated in 1905 (Genkō Museum).
Japanese samurai boarding Yuan ships in 1281.
The defensive wall at Hakata
Wooden anchor of Mongol invasion
Stone anchor of Mongol invasion
Shōni Kagesuke and his forces in Akasaka
Stoneware bombs, known in Japanese as tetsuhō (iron bomb), or in Chinese as zhentianlei (literally, heaven-shaking thunder), excavated from Takashima shipwreck, October 2011.
Takezaki Suenaga and escaping Mongolians
A typical Ko-Hōki (old Hōki) school tachi. Dōjikiri, by Yasutsuna. 12th century, Heian period, National Treasure, Tokyo National Museum. This sword is one of the Five Swords Under Heaven. (天下五剣 Tenka Goken)
thumb|A Sōshū school katana. It was originally a tachi forged by Masamune in the 14th century, but later it was cut from the root and converted into a katana. As it was owned by Ishida Mitsunari, it was commonly called Ishida Masamune. Important Cultural Property, Tokyo National Museum.
Japanese attack ships
Mongol soldiers, second version
Mongol ships, second version
Japanese armour ō-yoroi, National Treasure, Kasuga grand shrine
Mongol brigandine armour
Mongol helmet

The failed invasions also mark the first use of the word kamikaze ("Divine Wind").