Kamrup region

KamrupKamarupaAncient Kamrupregioneastern KamrupKamrupi cultural regionKāmarūpa regionSarkar Kamrup
Kamrup or Kamarupa is the modern region situated between two rivers, the Manas and the Barnady in Western Assam, congruent to ancient "Kamapitha", "Kamarupa Mandala" of Pragjyotisha Bhukti, medieval "Sarkar Kamrup" and modern "Undivided Kamrup district", though historian Dinesh Chandra Sircar suspects Kamapitha division as fabrications from late medieval times.wikipedia
124 Related Articles

Lower Assam

Western AssamKamarupaLower – Assam
Kamrup or Kamarupa is the modern region situated between two rivers, the Manas and the Barnady in Western Assam, congruent to ancient "Kamapitha", "Kamarupa Mandala" of Pragjyotisha Bhukti, medieval "Sarkar Kamrup" and modern "Undivided Kamrup district", though historian Dinesh Chandra Sircar suspects Kamapitha division as fabrications from late medieval times. Though the ancient kingdom covered initially present undivided Kamrup region, Western Assam but later expanded to include rest of the Brahmaputra valley, North Bengal as well as most of the northern parts of Bangladesh, Bhutan and at some point parts of Bengal and Bihar, starting with acquisition of Davaka (Central Assam) in east.
Lower Assam (also Western Assam) is a region situated in Western Brahmaputra Valley encompassing Kamrup and Goalpara regions.

Barnadi River

Barnady
Kamrup or Kamarupa is the modern region situated between two rivers, the Manas and the Barnady in Western Assam, congruent to ancient "Kamapitha", "Kamarupa Mandala" of Pragjyotisha Bhukti, medieval "Sarkar Kamrup" and modern "Undivided Kamrup district", though historian Dinesh Chandra Sircar suspects Kamapitha division as fabrications from late medieval times.
The Barnadi (Bornadi) River was the geographical separation between the British Kamrup district and Darrang district.

Kamarupa

Kamarupa kingdomPragjyotishaKamrup
The first historical mention of Kamarupa comes from Samudragupta's 4th-century Allahabad prasasti, where it is mentioned along with Davaka and Samatata as frontier kingdoms of the Gupta empire.
Though the historical kingdom disappeared by the 12th century to be replaced by smaller political entities, the notion of Kamarupa persisted and ancient and medieval chroniclers continued to call this region by this name.

Brahmaputra Valley

Assam ValleyvalleyBrahmaputra
Though the ancient kingdom covered initially present undivided Kamrup region, Western Assam but later expanded to include rest of the Brahmaputra valley, North Bengal as well as most of the northern parts of Bangladesh, Bhutan and at some point parts of Bengal and Bihar, starting with acquisition of Davaka (Central Assam) in east.
The valley consists of the western Brahmaputra valley covering the regions of Goalpara and Kamrup; the central Brahmaputra valley region covering Darrang, Nagaon and the North Bank and Eastern Brahmaputra Valley comprising districts of Sonitpur, Lakhimpur, Dibrugarh and Sibsagar.

Battle of Itakhuli

retook Guwahati
After the Battle of Itakhuli (1682), the Ahom kingdom established control over Sarkar Kamrup, and it became the domain of the Borphukan, based in Guwahati.
With this win, the Ahoms recovered Sarkar Kamrup from the Mughals.

Dewangiri

Dewangiri was northern parts of Kamrup, which were ceded to Bhutan in 1951.

Rangiya

Rangia
In Ancient times it was part of Ancient Kamrup, and subsequently included in Kamapitha division of Kamarupa Kingdom.

Manas River

Drangme ChhuManasManas Chhu
Kamrup or Kamarupa is the modern region situated between two rivers, the Manas and the Barnady in Western Assam, congruent to ancient "Kamapitha", "Kamarupa Mandala" of Pragjyotisha Bhukti, medieval "Sarkar Kamrup" and modern "Undivided Kamrup district", though historian Dinesh Chandra Sircar suspects Kamapitha division as fabrications from late medieval times.

Kamapitha

Kamrup or Kamarupa is the modern region situated between two rivers, the Manas and the Barnady in Western Assam, congruent to ancient "Kamapitha", "Kamarupa Mandala" of Pragjyotisha Bhukti, medieval "Sarkar Kamrup" and modern "Undivided Kamrup district", though historian Dinesh Chandra Sircar suspects Kamapitha division as fabrications from late medieval times.

Undivided Kamrup district

KamrupKamrup Districtold Kamrup district
Kamrup or Kamarupa is the modern region situated between two rivers, the Manas and the Barnady in Western Assam, congruent to ancient "Kamapitha", "Kamarupa Mandala" of Pragjyotisha Bhukti, medieval "Sarkar Kamrup" and modern "Undivided Kamrup district", though historian Dinesh Chandra Sircar suspects Kamapitha division as fabrications from late medieval times.

North Bengal

Northern Bengalnorthern BangladeshNorth
Though the ancient kingdom covered initially present undivided Kamrup region, Western Assam but later expanded to include rest of the Brahmaputra valley, North Bengal as well as most of the northern parts of Bangladesh, Bhutan and at some point parts of Bengal and Bihar, starting with acquisition of Davaka (Central Assam) in east. Pre-colonial Kamrup was a large territory consisting of Western Assam and North Bengal, which keep reducing in size in subsequent periods.

Colonial Assam

AssamChief Commissioner's Province of Assam (Northeast Frontier Province)British
In the nineteenth century, eastern Kamrup became part of Colonial Assam while parts of western Kamrup merged with Bengal.

Bengal

Bengal regionBengal, IndiaBengali
Though the ancient kingdom covered initially present undivided Kamrup region, Western Assam but later expanded to include rest of the Brahmaputra valley, North Bengal as well as most of the northern parts of Bangladesh, Bhutan and at some point parts of Bengal and Bihar, starting with acquisition of Davaka (Central Assam) in east. In the nineteenth century, eastern Kamrup became part of Colonial Assam while parts of western Kamrup merged with Bengal.

Pragjyotishpura

Ancient cities Pragjyotishpura and Durjaya were located in modern Kamrup.

Durjaya

Ancient cities Pragjyotishpura and Durjaya were located in modern Kamrup.

Kamrupi culture

Kamrupi
Kamrup is considered as a politically, socially and culturally separate unit, and cultural artifacts from this region are called Kamrupi.

Indian epic poetry

Hindu epicepicIndian epic
The origin of name attributed to a legend in epic, the Kalika Purana mentioned that country got its name from cupid Kamadeva (Kama), who regained his form (Rupa) back from ashes here.

Kalika Purana

Kalika-PuranaKalikaKālikā Purāṇa
The origin of name attributed to a legend in epic, the Kalika Purana mentioned that country got its name from cupid Kamadeva (Kama), who regained his form (Rupa) back from ashes here.

Kamadeva

KamaManmathaManmadhan
The origin of name attributed to a legend in epic, the Kalika Purana mentioned that country got its name from cupid Kamadeva (Kama), who regained his form (Rupa) back from ashes here.

Samudragupta

Samudra GuptaSamudra-GuptaSamudragupta (340-380)
The first historical mention of Kamarupa comes from Samudragupta's 4th-century Allahabad prasasti, where it is mentioned along with Davaka and Samatata as frontier kingdoms of the Gupta empire.

Allahabad pillar

Allahabad inscriptionAllahabad pillar inscriptionAllahabad pillar capital
The first historical mention of Kamarupa comes from Samudragupta's 4th-century Allahabad prasasti, where it is mentioned along with Davaka and Samatata as frontier kingdoms of the Gupta empire.

Davaka

The first historical mention of Kamarupa comes from Samudragupta's 4th-century Allahabad prasasti, where it is mentioned along with Davaka and Samatata as frontier kingdoms of the Gupta empire.

Samatata

Kingdom of SamatataSamatata janapadaSamatata Kingdom
The first historical mention of Kamarupa comes from Samudragupta's 4th-century Allahabad prasasti, where it is mentioned along with Davaka and Samatata as frontier kingdoms of the Gupta empire.

Gupta Empire

GuptaGupta periodGuptas
The first historical mention of Kamarupa comes from Samudragupta's 4th-century Allahabad prasasti, where it is mentioned along with Davaka and Samatata as frontier kingdoms of the Gupta empire.