Kang Sheng

K'ang Sheng
Kang Sheng (c. undefined 1898 – 16 December 1975) was a Communist Party of China (CPC) official best known for having overseen the work of the CPC's internal security and intelligence apparatus during the early 1940s and again at the height of the Cultural Revolution in the late 1960s and early 1970s.wikipedia
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Cultural Revolution

Chinese Cultural RevolutionGreat Proletarian Cultural RevolutionCulture Revolution
undefined 1898 – 16 December 1975) was a Communist Party of China (CPC) official best known for having overseen the work of the CPC's internal security and intelligence apparatus during the early 1940s and again at the height of the Cultural Revolution in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
Mao would deliver his final blow to Peng Zhen at a high-profile Politburo meeting through loyalists Kang Sheng and Chen Boda.

Gang of Four

The Gang Of FourGang of ''FourGang of Four (China)
After the death of Mao and the subsequent arrest of the Gang of Four, Kang Sheng was accused of sharing responsibility with the Gang for the excesses of the Cultural Revolution and in 1980 he was expelled posthumously from the CPC.
Two other men who were already dead in 1976, Kang Sheng and Xie Fuzhi, were named as having been part of the "Gang".

Communist Party of China

Communist PartyCPCCommunist
undefined 1898 – 16 December 1975) was a Communist Party of China (CPC) official best known for having overseen the work of the CPC's internal security and intelligence apparatus during the early 1940s and again at the height of the Cultural Revolution in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
A member of the Politburo Standing Committee often represents a sector; during Mao's reign, he controlled the People's Liberation Army, Kang Sheng, the security apparatus, and Zhou Enlai, the State Council and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Wang Ming

Wang Ming Leftist LineWang Ming”
A member of the CPC from the early 1920s, he spent time in Moscow during the early 1930s, where he learned the methods of the NKVD and became a supporter of Wang Ming for leadership of the CPC.
Zhou, Zhang Wentian, Bo Gu, Kang Sheng, Chen Yun, and Lu Futan, Li Zhusheng were selected to be in charge of the daily work of the CCP.

Mao Zedong

MaoMao Tse-tungChairman Mao
After returning to China in the late 1930s, Kang Sheng switched his allegiance to Mao Zedong and became a close associate of Mao during the Anti-Japanese War, the Chinese Civil War and after.
For example, in his biography of Mao, Philip Short notes that in the Yan'an Rectification Movement, Mao gave explicit instructions that "no cadre is to be killed", but in practice allowed security chief Kang Sheng to drive opponents to suicide and that "this pattern was repeated throughout his leadership of the People's Republic".

Li Lisan

Li
He helped organize the February 1925 strike against Japanese companies that culminated in the May 30th Movement, a huge Communist-led demonstration, and brought Kang into close contact with Party leaders Liu Shaoqi, Li Lisan and Zhang Guotao.
Moreover, when Wang Ming and Kang Sheng came back to Moscow as representatives of the CCP to the Comintern, they persecuted Li by every means available.

Zhou Enlai

Chou En-laiZhou En-laiZhou En Lai
Kang participated in the March 1927 worker's insurrection alongside Gu Shunzhang and under the leadership of Zhao Shiyan, Luo Yinong, Wang Shouhua and Zhou Enlai.
Soon after they had been removed, Zhou argued that President Liu Shaoqi and Deng Xiaoping "should be allowed to come back to work", but this was opposed by Mao, Lin Biao, Kang Sheng and Chen Boda.

Chen Yun

Although cadres such as Chen Yun, who had been in Moscow with Wang and Kang, were aware of Kang's previous slavish support for Wang, Kang strenuously sought to change that history and obscure previous affiliations.
After Deng was rehabilitated later that year, Chen led the attack on the Maoist era at the November–December 1978 CPC CC Work Conference, raising the sensitive "six issues": the purges of Bo Yibo, Tao Zhu, Wang Heshou and Peng Dehuai; the 1976 Tiananmen Incident; and, Kang Sheng's errors.

Zhang Wentian

Luo Fu
By the end of April he was reported in tenth place, even below Luo Fu, the only member of the 28 Bolsheviks who still held a Politburo seat.
In September of the same year, the provisional central political bureau was established by Bo Gu, Zhang Wentian, Lu Futan, Li Zhusheng, Kang Sheng, Chen Yun, Huang Ping, Liu Shaoqi, Wang Yun Cheng and other nine; Bo Gu, Zhang Wentian, Lu Futan as the Standing Committee.

Red Guards

Red GuardRed Guards (China)Chinese Red Guards
With no limits imposed, no guidance offered, no one assuming responsibility for what occurred, and the Red Guards merely following their impulses, the assault upon their elders and the destruction of property grew completely out of control.
Mao, concerned that these work teams were hindering the course of the Cultural Revolution, dispatched Chen Boda, Jiang Qing, Kang Sheng, and others to join the Red Guards and combat the work teams.

Yan'an Rectification Movement

Cheng FengRectification campaign1942
Kang was deeply involved with the Yan'an Rectification Movement launched by Mao in February 1942, which was "central to Mao's mission of a thorough reinvention of Chinese society."
This Committee was run by Mao's close allies Kang Sheng, Li Fuchun, Peng Zhen, and Gao Gang, and later included Liu Shaoqi.

Nie Yuanzi

Cao sought out Nie Yuanzi, a Party branch secretary in the Philosophy Department with whom Kang and Cao had become acquainted years earlier in Yan'an.
In the 1940s, Nie moved to the Communist base in Yan'an, where she met Kang Sheng and his wife Cao Yi'ou.

Diaoyutai State Guesthouse

DiaoyutaiDiaoyutai compound
Two months later, [Kang] moved to the Diaoyutai guest complex in the capital to mastermind a team of ideologues for the campaign against Soviet revisionism.
During the Cultural Revolution, it was used as the office of the Central Cultural Revolution Group, and the residence of Chairman Mao Zedong, Jiang Qing (Madame Mao), Chen Boda and Kang Sheng.

Central Organization and Propaganda Leading Group

During the Cultural Revolution, Kang Sheng was actively involved in controlling the CPC propaganda apparatus, being appointed head of the "Central Organization and Propaganda Leading Group", while Yao Wenyuan as head of another "Propaganda Leading Group".
The COPLG included Kang Sheng as group leader, and Jiang Qing, Zhang Chunqiao, Yao Wenyuan, Ji Dengkui and Li Desheng as group members.

Khmer Rouge

CambodiaCambodiancommunist
Perhaps Kang's most important influence over Chinese foreign policy came during the Cultural Revolution itself, when he was instrumental in developing Chinese support for the Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia.
From November 1965 to February 1966, Pol Pot received training from high-ranking CPC officials such as Chen Boda and Zhang Chunqiao, on topics such as the communist revolution in China, class conflicts, Communist International, etc. Pol Pot was particularly impressed by the lecture on political purge by Kang Sheng.

Liu Zhidan

In 1962, Kang used the publication of a novel about Liu Zhidan, a Party member killed in battle against the Kuomintang in 1936, as the basis for reviving the Gao Gang affair, successfully insinuating that the novel's publication was an effort by Xi Zhongxun and others to reverse the Party's verdict on Gao.
Liu Zhidan was hailed as martyr at the time of his death and remembered as such until 1962 when a biographical novel about his life was criticized by Kang Sheng as an anti-party conspiracy because one of the characters in the novel alluded to purged leader Gao Gang.

NKVD

Soviet intelligencePeople's Commissariat for Internal AffairsSoviet secret police
A member of the CPC from the early 1920s, he spent time in Moscow during the early 1930s, where he learned the methods of the NKVD and became a supporter of Wang Ming for leadership of the CPC.

Second Sino-Japanese War

Sino-Japanese WarJapanese invasion of ChinaJapanese invasion
After returning to China in the late 1930s, Kang Sheng switched his allegiance to Mao Zedong and became a close associate of Mao during the Anti-Japanese War, the Chinese Civil War and after.

Chinese Civil War

civil warCommunist RevolutionChina
After returning to China in the late 1930s, Kang Sheng switched his allegiance to Mao Zedong and became a close associate of Mao during the Anti-Japanese War, the Chinese Civil War and after.

China

People's Republic of ChinaChineseCHN
He remained at or near the pinnacle of power in the People's Republic of China from its establishment in 1949 until his death in 1975.

Zhucheng

XiàngzhōuZhucheng County
Kang Sheng was born in Dataizhuang (administered under Jiaonan County since 1946), Zhucheng County to the northwest of Qingdao in Shandong Province to a landowning family, some of whom had been Confucian scholars.

Qingdao

TsingtaoQingdao, ChinaTsingtao, China
Kang Sheng was born in Dataizhuang (administered under Jiaonan County since 1946), Zhucheng County to the northwest of Qingdao in Shandong Province to a landowning family, some of whom had been Confucian scholars.

Shandong

Shandong ProvinceShantungShantung Province
Kang Sheng was born in Dataizhuang (administered under Jiaonan County since 1946), Zhucheng County to the northwest of Qingdao in Shandong Province to a landowning family, some of whom had been Confucian scholars.

Confucianism

ConfucianConfucianistConfucian philosophy
Kang Sheng was born in Dataizhuang (administered under Jiaonan County since 1946), Zhucheng County to the northwest of Qingdao in Shandong Province to a landowning family, some of whom had been Confucian scholars.