Kanji

on'yomikun'yomikokujiChinese characterscharacterscharacterjukujikunon-yomiSino-Japanese readingkun-yomi
Kanji are the adopted logographic Chinese characters that are used in the Japanese writing system.wikipedia
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Japanese writing system

JapaneseJapanese charactersJapanese writing
Kanji are the adopted logographic Chinese characters that are used in the Japanese writing system.
The modern Japanese writing system uses a combination of logographic kanji, which are adopted Chinese characters, and syllabic kana.

Logogram

logographiclogographlogograms
Kanji are the adopted logographic Chinese characters that are used in the Japanese writing system.
Chinese characters (including Chinese hanzi, Japanese kanji and Korean hanja) are logograms; some Egyptian hieroglyphs and some graphemes in cuneiform script are also logograms.

Katakana

kanaalphabetical ordercharacters
They are used alongside the Japanese syllabic scripts hiragana and katakana. Katakana are mostly used for representing onomatopoeia, non-Japanese loanwords (except those borrowed from ancient Chinese), the names of plants and animals (with exceptions), and for emphasis on certain words.
Katakana is a Japanese syllabary, one component of the Japanese writing system along with hiragana, kanji and in some cases the Latin script (known as rōmaji).

Hiragana

(HiraganacharactersFiro-canna
They are used alongside the Japanese syllabic scripts hiragana and katakana.
Hiragana is a Japanese syllabary, one component of the Japanese writing system, along with katakana, kanji, and in some cases rōmaji (Latin script).

Japan

JPNJapaneseJP
Chinese characters first came to Japan on official seals, letters, swords, coins, mirrors, and other decorative items imported from China.
The kanji that make up Japan's name mean 'sun origin', and it is often called the "Land of the Rising Sun".

Kana

Japanese syllabaryJapanese KanaJapanese syllabaries
Thus the two other writing systems, hiragana and katakana, referred to collectively as kana, are descended from kanji.
Kana are the three syllabic that form parts of the Japanese writing system, contrasted with the logographic Chinese characters known in Japan as kanji : modern cursive hiragana ; modern angular katakana ; and the ancient syllabic use of kanji known as man'yōgana, which was ancestral to both hiragana and katakana.

Man'yōgana

Man'yoganaManyoganamanyōgana
Around 650 AD, a writing system called man'yōgana (used in the ancient poetry anthology Man'yōshū) evolved that used a number of Chinese characters for their sound, rather than for their meaning.
Man'yōgana uses kanji characters for their phonetic rather than semantic qualities—in other words, they are used for their sounds and not their meanings.

Okurigana

In modern Japanese, kanji are used to write parts of the language (usually content words) such as nouns, adjective stems, and verb stems, while hiragana are used to write inflected verb and adjective endings and as phonetic complements to disambiguate readings (okurigana), particles, and miscellaneous words which have no kanji or whose kanji is considered obscure or too difficult to read or remember.
Okurigana are kana suffixes following kanji stems in Japanese written words.

Gairaigo

loanwordforeign loan wordsFranponais
Katakana are mostly used for representing onomatopoeia, non-Japanese loanwords (except those borrowed from ancient Chinese), the names of plants and animals (with exceptions), and for emphasis on certain words.
These are primarily written in the katakana phonetic script, with a few older terms written in Chinese characters (kanji); this latter are known as ateji.

Furigana

forced readingon the right of the main textruby characters
In publishing, characters outside this category are often given furigana.
Furigana is a Japanese reading aid, consisting of smaller kana or syllabic characters, printed next to a kanji (ideographic character) or other character to indicate its pronunciation.

Extended shinjitai

extends kanji simplification
These are generally written using traditional characters, but extended shinjitai forms exist.
Extended shinjitai is the extension of the shinjitai (officially simplified kanji).

JIS X 0208

JIS C 6226-1978JIS952
Because there are places where such things have happened as the original drafting committee of the first standard taking care to separate characters between level 1 and level 2 and the second standard then shuffling some variant characters (異体字, itaiji) between the levels, at least in the first and second standards, it is conjectured that non-kanji and level 1-only implementation Japanese computer systems were at one time considered for development.

Man'yōshū

ManyōshūMan'yoshuMan'yō
Around 650 AD, a writing system called man'yōgana (used in the ancient poetry anthology Man'yōshū) evolved that used a number of Chinese characters for their sound, rather than for their meaning.
The literal translation of the kanji that make up the title Man'yōshū is "ten thousand — leaves — collection".

King of Na gold seal

a golden sealGold Seal of the King of NaKing of Na gold
The earliest known instance of such an import was the King of Na gold seal given by Emperor Guangwu of Han to a Yamato emissary in 57 AD.
The five Chinese characters appearing on the seal identify it as the seal of the King of Na state of Wa (Japan), vassal state of the Han Dynasty.

Dai Kan-Wa Jiten

Dai Kanwa JitenJapan's Great Chinese–Japanese DictionaryMorohashi
The Dai Kan-Wa Jiten, which is considered to be comprehensive in Japan, contains about 50,000 characters.
The Dai Kan-Wa Jiten is a Japanese dictionary of kanji (Chinese characters) compiled by Tetsuji Morohashi.

Ateji

transcription
In other cases, a character is used only for sound (ateji).
In modern Japanese, ateji (当て字, 宛字 or あてじ) principally refer to kanji used to phonetically represent native or borrowed words with less regard to the underlying meaning of the characters.

Jōyō kanji

JōyōJoyo Kanjicommon characters
The 2,136 jōyō kanji are regarded to be necessary for functional literacy in Japanese.
The jōyō kanji is the guide to kanji characters and their readings, announced officially by the Japanese Ministry of Education.

Classical Chinese

Literary ChineseChineseclassical
Later, groups of people called fuhito were organized under the monarch to read and write Classical Chinese.
For example, Japanese speakers use On'yomi pronunciation when reading the kanji of words of Chinese origin such as 銀行 (ginkō) or the name for the city of Tōkyō, but use Kun'yomi when the kanji represents a native word such as the reading of 行 in 行く (iku) or the reading of both characters in the name for the city of Ōsaka, and a system that aids Japanese speakers with Classical Chinese word order.

Japanese grammar

Japanesegrammaronbin
Later, during the Heian period (794–1185), however, a system known as kanbun emerged, which involved using Chinese text with diacritical marks to allow Japanese speakers to restructure and read Chinese sentences, by changing word order and adding particles and verb endings, in accordance with the rules of Japanese grammar.
(Note that while these prefixes are almost always in Hiragana — that is, as お o- or ご go — the kanji 御 is used for both o and go prefixes in formal writing.)

Chinese characters

ChineseChinese characterChinese:
Kanji are the adopted logographic Chinese characters that are used in the Japanese writing system. Chinese characters first came to Japan on official seals, letters, swords, coins, mirrors, and other decorative items imported from China. This contrasts with on'yomi, which are monosyllabic, and is unusual in the Chinese family of scripts, which generally use one character per syllable—not only in Chinese, but also in Korean, Vietnamese, and Zhuang; polysyllabic Chinese characters are rare and considered non-standard.
They remain a key component of the Japanese writing system where they are known as kanji.

Kanbun

Kanbun KundokuClassical Chinesekambun
Later, during the Heian period (794–1185), however, a system known as kanbun emerged, which involved using Chinese text with diacritical marks to allow Japanese speakers to restructure and read Chinese sentences, by changing word order and adding particles and verb endings, in accordance with the rules of Japanese grammar.
Compositions written in kanbun used two common types of Japanese kanji readings: Sino-Japanese on'yomi (音読み "pronunciation readings") borrowed from Chinese pronunciations and native Japanese kun'yomi from Japanese equivalents.

Chinese family of scripts

Chinese derivative characterHanHan scripts
This contrasts with on'yomi, which are monosyllabic, and is unusual in the Chinese family of scripts, which generally use one character per syllable—not only in Chinese, but also in Korean, Vietnamese, and Zhuang; polysyllabic Chinese characters are rare and considered non-standard.
They include logosyllabic systems such as the Chinese script itself (or hanzi, now in two forms, traditional and simplified), and adaptations to other languages, such as Kanji (Japanese), Hanja (Korean), Chữ nôm (Vietnamese) and sawndip (Zhuang).

Orthography

orthographicorthographiesorthographically
In 1946, after World War II and under the Allied Occupation of Japan, the Japanese government, guided by the Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers, instituted a series of orthographic reforms, to help children learn and to simplify kanji use in literature and periodicals.
Japanese is an example of a writing system that can be written using a combination of logographic kanji characters and syllabic hiragana and katakana characters; as with many non-alphabetic languages, alphabetic romaji characters may also be used as needed.

Nihon Shoki

NihongiNihonshokiNihon-Shoki
According to the Nihon Shoki and Kojiki, a semi-legendary scholar called Wani was dispatched to Japan by the Kingdom of Baekje during the reign of Emperor Ōjin in the early fifth century, bringing with him knowledge of Confucianism and Chinese characters.
Although written in Literary Kanji, some sections use styles characteristic of Japanese editors.

Japanese language

JapaneseJapanese-languageJp
They are used alongside the Japanese syllabic scripts hiragana and katakana.
Chinese characters (kanji) were used to write either words borrowed from Chinese, or Japanese words with the same or similar meanings.