Karakoa

joangasLanong
Karakoa were large outrigger warships from the Philippines.wikipedia
67 Related Articles

Outrigger canoe

Outrigger canoeingoutriggeroutrigger ship
Like other outrigger vessels, karakoa had very shallow drafts, allowing them to navigate right up to the shoreline.
Similarly, the Spanish priest Francisco Combés, describing the large karakoa outrigger warships of the Visayan Islands in the Philippines, remarked:

Pampanga

Pampanga ProvinceKapampanganPampango
It later led to a total ban of the ship and the traditions assigned to it. In recent years, the revitalization of karakoa ship-building and its usage are being pushed by some scholars from Pampanga.
There have been proposals to revitalize the karakoa shipbuilding tradition of the Kapampangan people in recent years.

Kora kora

Kora-koracoracora
The name and variants thereof (including caracora, caracore, caracole, corcoa, cora-cora, and caracolle) were used interchangeably with various other similar warships from maritime Southeast Asia, like the kora kora of the Maluku Islands.
Karakoa, similar warships from the Philippines

Junk (ship)

junkjunksChinese junk
joanga, Spanish for "junk", native dyong or adyong).
The term junk (Portuguese junco; Dutch jonk; and Spanish junco) was also used by European explorers for large unrelated native Austronesian warships, like the Philippine karakoa and the Maluku kora kora.

Balangay

baeangayBalangay (Butuan Boat)barangays
Karakoa were similar to and were sometimes confused with balangay, but can be differentiated in that they possessed raised decks (burulan) amidships and on the outriggers.
Karakoa, a similar vessel used primarily as a warship

Lanong

Lanong
Like the karakoa, large lanong were also inaccurately known by the Spanish as joangas or juangas (Spanish for "junk").

Garay (ship)

garaypanco
Garay
Garay did not possess outriggers (unlike the lanong and other karakoa warships).

Borobudur ship

Borobudur Ship Expeditionthose depicted
Borobudur ship
Karakoa

Paraw

Outrigger

outriggersriggerStabilizers
Karakoa were large outrigger warships from the Philippines.

Warship

warshipsshipswar ship
Karakoa were large outrigger warships from the Philippines.

Philippines

🇵🇭FilipinoPhilippine
Karakoa were large outrigger warships from the Philippines.

Maritime Southeast Asia

insular Southeast AsiaSoutheast AsiaArchipelago
The name and variants thereof (including caracora, caracore, caracole, corcoa, cora-cora, and caracolle) were used interchangeably with various other similar warships from maritime Southeast Asia, like the kora kora of the Maluku Islands.

Maluku Islands

MalukuSpice IslandsMoluccas
The name and variants thereof (including caracora, caracore, caracole, corcoa, cora-cora, and caracolle) were used interchangeably with various other similar warships from maritime Southeast Asia, like the kora kora of the Maluku Islands.

Arabic

Arabic-languageArabArabic language
The origin of the names are unknown, but it has been proposed that they may have been derived from Arabic qurqur (pl.

Crescent

crescent mooncrescentsMoon
They also had sharply curved prows and sterns, giving the ships a characteristic crescent shape.

Francisco Combés

The Spanish priest Francisco Combés described karakoa in great detail in 1667.

Draft (hull)

draughtdraftdrew
Like other outrigger vessels, karakoa had very shallow drafts, allowing them to navigate right up to the shoreline.

Dugout canoe

dugoutdugout canoesdugouts
The keel was essentially a dugout made from the single trunk of hardwoods like tugas (Vitex parviflora) or tindalo (Afzelia rhomboidea). Strakes were built up along the sides of the keel, forming the hull.

Hardwood

hardwoodshardwood treeshard wood
The keel was essentially a dugout made from the single trunk of hardwoods like tugas (Vitex parviflora) or tindalo (Afzelia rhomboidea). Strakes were built up along the sides of the keel, forming the hull.

Vitex parviflora

molavemolave tree
The keel was essentially a dugout made from the single trunk of hardwoods like tugas (Vitex parviflora) or tindalo (Afzelia rhomboidea). Strakes were built up along the sides of the keel, forming the hull.

Afzelia rhomboidea

Tindalotindalo wood
The keel was essentially a dugout made from the single trunk of hardwoods like tugas (Vitex parviflora) or tindalo (Afzelia rhomboidea). Strakes were built up along the sides of the keel, forming the hull.

Strake

garboardsheer strakeStrakes
The keel was essentially a dugout made from the single trunk of hardwoods like tugas (Vitex parviflora) or tindalo (Afzelia rhomboidea). Strakes were built up along the sides of the keel, forming the hull.

Shorea

merantiLauanPhilippine mahogany
They were usually made from lawaan wood (Shorea spp.) and were tightly fitted to the keel and with each other by dowels reinforced further with fiber lashings (usually from sugar palm) on carved lugs.

Dowel

dowelsdowel pinbar
They were usually made from lawaan wood (Shorea spp.) and were tightly fitted to the keel and with each other by dowels reinforced further with fiber lashings (usually from sugar palm) on carved lugs.