Karate

karatekasport karateKaratedokarate-doKarate Competitionkarate masterKarate doKarate ranksKarate-dōKaratedō
Karate (Okinawan pronunciation: ) is a martial art developed in the Ryukyu Kingdom.wikipedia
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Gichin Funakoshi

Funakoshi Gichin
In 1922, the Japanese Ministry of Education invited Gichin Funakoshi to Tokyo to give a karate demonstration. His students became some of the most well-known karate masters, including Gichin Funakoshi, Kenwa Mabuni, and Motobu Chōki.
Gichin Funakoshi is the founder of Shotokan Karate-Do, perhaps the most widely known style of karate, and is known as a "father of modern karate".

World Karate Federation

WKFUnion of African Karate FederationWorld Union of Karate-Do Organizations
Web Japan (sponsored by the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs) claims there are 50 million karate practitioners worldwide, while the World Karate Federation claims there are 100 million practitioners around the world.
The World Karate Federation (WKF) is the largest international governing body of sport karate with 191 member countries.

Martial arts

martial artistmartial artmartial artists
Karate (Okinawan pronunciation: ) is a martial art developed in the Ryukyu Kingdom.
In Japan, the same period marks the formation of the modern forms of judo, jujutsu, karate, and kendo (among others) based on revivals of old schools of Edo period martial arts which had been suppressed during the Meiji Restoration.

Shōshin Nagamine

Shoshin Nagamine
Shōshin Nagamine said, "Karate may be considered as the conflict within oneself or as a life-long marathon which can be won only through self-discipline, hard training and one's own creative efforts."
Shōshin Nagamine was a Japanese author from Okinawa as well as a soldier, police officer, and karate master.

Kick

kickingaxe kickSide kick
Karate is now predominantly a striking art using punching, kicking, knee strikes, elbow strikes and open-hand techniques such as knife-hands, spear-hands and palm-heel strikes.
Kicks play a significant role in many forms of martial arts, such as savate, taekwondo, MMA, sikaran, karate, Pankration, Kung Fu, Vovinam, kickboxing, Muay Thai, Yaw-Yan, capoeira, silat and kalaripayattu.

Shigeru Egami

Shigeru Egami, Chief Instructor of Shotokan Dojo, opined that "the majority of followers of karate in overseas countries pursue karate only for its fighting techniques ... Movies and television ... depict karate as a mysterious way of fighting capable of causing death or injury with a single blow ... the mass media present a pseudo art far from the real thing."
Shigeru Egami was a pioneering Japanese master of Shotokan karate who founded the Shōtōkai style.

Okinawan martial arts

Shuri-teTomari-teNaha-te
It developed from the indigenous Ryukyuan martial arts (called te, "hand"; tii in Okinawan) under the influence of Kung Fu, particularly Fujian White Crane.
Okinawan martial arts refers to the martial arts, such as karate, tegumi and Okinawan kobudō, which originated among the indigenous people of Okinawa Island.

Nunchaku

nunchucksnunchuksnunchakus
Many Okinawan weapons such as the sai, tonfa, and nunchaku may have originated in and around Southeast Asia.
The nunchaku is most widely used in martial arts such as Okinawan kobudō and karate.

Matsumura Sōkon

Sokon MatsumuraSōkon MatsumuraBushi Matsumura
Around the 1820s Sakukawa's most significant student Matsumura Sōkon (1809–1899) taught a synthesis of te (Shuri-te and Tomari-te) and Shaolin (Chinese 少林) styles.
Matsumura Sōkon was one of the original karate masters of Okinawa.

Kūsankū (kata)

KusankuKanku daiKusanku kata
Sakukawa Kanga (1782–1838) had studied pugilism and staff (bo) fighting in China (according to one legend, under the guidance of Kosokun, originator of kusanku kata).
Kūshankū also called Kūsankū or Kankū-dai, is an open hand karate kata that is studied by many practitioners of Okinawan Karate, specifically styles related to Shuri-te.

Ankō Itosu

Anko ItosuItosu AnkoItosu Ankō
Matsumura taught his art to Itosu Ankō (1831–1915) among others.
Ankō Itosu is considered by many the father of modern karate, although this title is also often given to Gichin Funakoshi because the latter spread karate throughout Japan.

Motobu-ryū

Motobu-ryuMotobu Ryu
One surviving example is the Motobu-ryū school passed down from the Motobu family by Seikichi Uehara.
Motobu-ryū is a school of karate founded by Choki Motobu in 1922.

Shōrin-ryū

Shorin-ryuShorin-ryūShōrin-ryū Karate
Matsumura's style would later become the Shōrin-ryū style.
Shōrin-ryū is one of the major modern Okinawan martial arts and is one of the oldest styles of karate.

Punch (combat)

punchpunchespunching
Karate is now predominantly a striking art using punching, kicking, knee strikes, elbow strikes and open-hand techniques such as knife-hands, spear-hands and palm-heel strikes.
Styles such as boxing, Suntukan or Russian fist fighting use punches alone, while others such as Kickboxing, Muay Thai, Lethwei or karate may use both punches and kicks.

Kenwa Mabuni

Mabuni Kenwa
His students became some of the most well-known karate masters, including Gichin Funakoshi, Kenwa Mabuni, and Motobu Chōki.
Kenwa Mabuni was one of the first karateka to teach karate in mainland Japan and is credited as developing the style known as Shitō-ryū.

Fujian White Crane

CraneWhite CraneWhite Crane Kung Fu
It developed from the indigenous Ryukyuan martial arts (called te, "hand"; tii in Okinawan) under the influence of Kung Fu, particularly Fujian White Crane.
Popular karate bunkai (breakdown) of white crane katas like hakutsuru stress vital point striking or kyusho.

Elbow (strike)

elbow strikeElbowingelbows
Karate is now predominantly a striking art using punching, kicking, knee strikes, elbow strikes and open-hand techniques such as knife-hands, spear-hands and palm-heel strikes.
Some well known and respected traditional martial arts that use elbows are Karate, Taekwondo, Hung Ga, Bajiquan, Wing Chun, Silat, Lethwei and Muay boran.

Shotokan

Shotokan KarateShōtōkanShotokan-ryu
Gichin Funakoshi, founder of Shotokan karate, is generally credited with having introduced and popularized karate on the main islands of Japan.
Shōtōkan is a style of karate, developed from various martial arts by Gichin Funakoshi (1868–1957) and his son Gigo (Yoshitaka) Funakoshi (1906–1945).

Seisan

SeishanSei ShanSeisan/Hangetsu
He later developed his own style of Uechi-ryū karate based on the Sanchin, Seisan, and Sanseiryu kata that he had studied in China.
The karate kata Seisan (alternate names Sesan, Seishan, Jusan, Hangetsu) literally means '13'.

Seikichi Toguchi

Chōjun Miyagi taught such well-known karateka as Seko Higa (who also trained with Higaonna), Meitoku Yagi, Miyazato Ei'ichi, and Seikichi Toguchi, and for a very brief time near the end of his life, An'ichi Miyagi (a teacher claimed by Morio Higaonna).
Seikichi Toguchi was the founder of Shorei-kan karate.

Uechi-ryū

Uechi-ryuUechi RyuPangai-noon
He later developed his own style of Uechi-ryū karate based on the Sanchin, Seisan, and Sanseiryu kata that he had studied in China.
Uechi-Ryū is a traditional style of Okinawan karate.

Chōjun Miyagi

Chojun MiyagiMiyagi ChojunMiyagi Chōjun
One of his students was the founder of Gojū-ryū, Chōjun Miyagi.
Chōjun Miyagi was an Okinawan martial artist who founded the Gōjū-ryū school of karate by blending Okinawan and Chinese influences.

Kanbun Uechi

Uechi Kanbun
In addition to the three early te styles of karate a fourth Okinawan influence is that of Kanbun Uechi (1877–1948).
Kanbun Uechi was the founder of Uechi-Ryū, one of the primary karate styles of Okinawa.

Morio Higaonna

Chōjun Miyagi taught such well-known karateka as Seko Higa (who also trained with Higaonna), Meitoku Yagi, Miyazato Ei'ichi, and Seikichi Toguchi, and for a very brief time near the end of his life, An'ichi Miyagi (a teacher claimed by Morio Higaonna).
Morio Higaonna is a prominent Okinawan karate practitioner who is the founder and former Chief Instructor of the International Okinawan Goju-ryu Karate-do Federation (IOGKF).

Knifehand strike

karate chopkarate chopschopping
Karate is now predominantly a striking art using punching, kicking, knee strikes, elbow strikes and open-hand techniques such as knife-hands, spear-hands and palm-heel strikes.
Tegatana is a term from Japanese martial arts like aikido and Chinese-Okinawan martial arts like karate and Shorinji Kempo referring to a hand position that resembles that of the blade of a sword.