Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

Lew AlcindorKareem Abdul JabbarAbdul-JabbarKareemKareem Abdul-JabaarKareem Abdul JabaarKareem Abdul JabarKareem Abdul-Jabbar (Lew Alcindor)Kareem CourtKareem-Abdul Jabbar
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor Jr.; April 16, 1947) is an American retired professional basketball player who played 20 seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA) for the Milwaukee Bucks and the Los Angeles Lakers.wikipedia
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Milwaukee Bucks

MilwaukeeBucksMarvin Fishman
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor Jr.; April 16, 1947) is an American retired professional basketball player who played 20 seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA) for the Milwaukee Bucks and the Los Angeles Lakers.
They have featured such notable players as Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Sidney Moncrief, Oscar Robertson, Bob Dandridge, Bob Lanier, Glenn Robinson, Ray Allen, Sam Cassell, Junior Bridgeman, Michael Redd, Terry Cummings, Vin Baker, Jon McGlocklin, Marques Johnson, and Brian Winters.

Los Angeles Lakers

Minneapolis LakersL.A. LakersLakers
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor Jr.; April 16, 1947) is an American retired professional basketball player who played 20 seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA) for the Milwaukee Bucks and the Los Angeles Lakers.
After the retirement of West and Chamberlain, the team acquired Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, who also won multiple MVP awards, but was unable to make the Finals in the late 1970s.

NBA All-Defensive Team

NBA All-Defensive Second TeamNBA All-Defensive First TeamAll-Defensive Team
During his career as a center, Abdul-Jabbar was a record six-time NBA Most Valuable Player (MVP), a record 19-time NBA All-Star, a 15-time All-NBA selection, and an 11-time NBA All-Defensive Team member.
Kevin Garnett and Kobe Bryant follow with 12 total honors each, and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar has 11 total selections.

List of first overall NBA draft picks

first overall pickfirst overallfirst overall draft pick
Drafted with the first overall pick by the one-season-old Bucks franchise in the 1969 NBA draft, Alcindor spent six seasons in Milwaukee.
Eleven first picks have won the NBA Most Valuable Player Award: Oscar Robertson, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (record six-time winner), Bill Walton, Magic Johnson (three-time winner), Hakeem Olajuwon, David Robinson, Shaquille O'Neal, Allen Iverson, Tim Duncan (two-time winner), LeBron James (four-time winner), and Derrick Rose (youngest winner).

John Wooden

John R. WoodenCoach Woodena college basketball icon
After winning 71 consecutive basketball games on his high school team in New York City, Alcindor was recruited by Jerry Norman, the assistant coach of UCLA, where he played for coach John Wooden on three consecutive national championship teams and was a record three-time MVP of the NCAA Tournament.
One of the most revered coaches in the history of sports, Wooden was beloved by his former players, among them Lew Alcindor (later Kareem Abdul-Jabbar) and Bill Walton.

National Basketball Association

NBANBA.comBasketball Association of America
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor Jr.; April 16, 1947) is an American retired professional basketball player who played 20 seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA) for the Milwaukee Bucks and the Los Angeles Lakers.
The NBA landed the most important college star of the era, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (then known as Lew Alcindor).

1969 NBA draft

19691969 Draft1969 National Basketball Association draft
Drafted with the first overall pick by the one-season-old Bucks franchise in the 1969 NBA draft, Alcindor spent six seasons in Milwaukee. The Harlem Globetrotters offered Alcindor $1 million to play for them, but he declined and was picked first in the 1969 NBA draft by the Milwaukee Bucks, who were in only their second season of existence.
Lew Alcindor (later known as Kareem Abdul-Jabbar) from UCLA was selected first overall by the Milwaukee Bucks.

Showtime (basketball)

ShowtimeShowtime LakersShowtime era
Abdul-Jabbar's contributions were a key component in the "Showtime" era of Lakers basketball.
Led by Magic Johnson's passing skills and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar's scoring, the team relied on fast breaks and won five NBA championships.

Pat Riley

NBA coach Pat Riley and players Isiah Thomas and Julius Erving have called him the greatest basketball player of all time.
Linton High School's 74–68 victory over New York City's Power Memorial on December 29, 1961, is remembered mostly for its two stars: Power Memorial's Lew Alcindor (who later changed his name to Kareem Abdul-Jabbar); and his future coach with the Los Angeles Lakers, Pat Riley.

Slam dunk

dunkdunkingdunks
By the eighth grade (age 13–14) he had grown to 6ft 8in tall and could already slam dunk a basketball.
Many people have attributed this to the dominance of the then-college phenomenon Lew Alcindor (now known as Kareem Abdul-Jabbar); the no-dunking rule is sometimes referred to as the "Lew Alcindor rule."

Naismith College Player of the Year

Naismith AwardNaismithNaismith Trophy
During his college career, Alcindor was twice named Player of the Year (1967, 1969); was a three-time First Team All-American (1967–1969); played on three NCAA basketball champion teams (1967, 1968 and 1969); was honored as the Most Outstanding Player in the NCAA Tournament three times and became the first-ever Naismith College Player of the Year in 1969.
Lew Alcindor of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Anne Donovan of Old Dominion University were the first winners, respectively.

Point (basketball)

Pointsscoringpoint
At the time of his retirement at age 42 in 1989, Abdul-Jabbar was the NBA's all-time leader in points scored (38,387), games played (1,560), minutes played (57,446), field goals made (15,837), field goal attempts (28,307), blocked shots (3,189), defensive rebounds (9,394), career wins (1,074), and personal fouls (4,657).

Power Memorial Academy

Power MemorialPower Memorial Academy, New York City
Alcindor began his record-breaking basketball accomplishments when he was in high school, where he led coach Jack Donahue's Power Memorial Academy team to three straight New York City Catholic championships, a 71-game winning streak, and a 79–2 overall record.
It was a basketball powerhouse, producing several NBA players including Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Len Elmore, Mario Elie, Chris Mullin, as well as NBA referee Dick Bavetta and a record 71-game winning streak.

Julius Erving

Dr. JJulius "Dr. J" ErvingJulius "Doctor J" Erving
NBA coach Pat Riley and players Isiah Thomas and Julius Erving have called him the greatest basketball player of all time.
This move would have brought him together with Oscar Robertson and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

Center (basketball)

CenterCcentre
During his career as a center, Abdul-Jabbar was a record six-time NBA Most Valuable Player (MVP), a record 19-time NBA All-Star, a 15-time All-NBA selection, and an 11-time NBA All-Defensive Team member.
After not winning in 1966, Wooden's teams changed their style when Lew Alcindor became eligible.

1968 NCAA University Division Basketball Tournament

1968NCAA Tournament1968 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament
During his college career, Alcindor was twice named Player of the Year (1967, 1969); was a three-time First Team All-American (1967–1969); played on three NCAA basketball champion teams (1967, 1968 and 1969); was honored as the Most Outstanding Player in the NCAA Tournament three times and became the first-ever Naismith College Player of the Year in 1969.
Lew Alcindor of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player for the second of three consecutive years.

1969 NCAA University Division Basketball Tournament

19691969 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament1969 NCAA Tournament
During his college career, Alcindor was twice named Player of the Year (1967, 1969); was a three-time First Team All-American (1967–1969); played on three NCAA basketball champion teams (1967, 1968 and 1969); was honored as the Most Outstanding Player in the NCAA Tournament three times and became the first-ever Naismith College Player of the Year in 1969.
Lew Alcindor of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.

1967 NCAA University Division Basketball Tournament

1967NCAA Tournament1967 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament
During his college career, Alcindor was twice named Player of the Year (1967, 1969); was a three-time First Team All-American (1967–1969); played on three NCAA basketball champion teams (1967, 1968 and 1969); was honored as the Most Outstanding Player in the NCAA Tournament three times and became the first-ever Naismith College Player of the Year in 1969.
Sophomore center Lew Alcindor (later named Kareem Abdul-Jabbar) of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.

Isiah Thomas

Isaiah Thomasanother playerIsiah L. Thomas
NBA coach Pat Riley and players Isiah Thomas and Julius Erving have called him the greatest basketball player of all time.
In 1988, the Pistons' first trip to the Finals saw them face the Los Angeles Lakers, led by Magic Johnson, James Worthy, and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

Basketball

basketball playermen's basketballhigh school basketball
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor Jr.; April 16, 1947) is an American retired professional basketball player who played 20 seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA) for the Milwaukee Bucks and the Los Angeles Lakers.
The NBA has featured many famous players, including George Mikan, the first dominating "big man"; ball-handling wizard Bob Cousy and defensive genius Bill Russell of the Boston Celtics; charismatic center Wilt Chamberlain, who originally played for the barnstorming Harlem Globetrotters; all-around stars Oscar Robertson and Jerry West; more recent big men Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Shaquille O'Neal, Hakeem Olajuwon and Karl Malone; playmakers John Stockton, Isiah Thomas and Steve Nash; crowd-pleasing forwards Julius Erving and Charles Barkley; European stars Dirk Nowitzki, Pau Gasol and Tony Parker; more recent superstars LeBron James, Allen Iverson and Kobe Bryant; and the three players who many credit with ushering the professional game to its highest level of popularity during the 1980s and 1990s: Larry Bird, Earvin "Magic" Johnson, and Michael Jordan.

Oscar Robertson Trophy

USBWA College Player of the YearRobertsonOscar Robertson Award
In 1967 and 1968, he also won USBWA College Player of the Year, which later became the Oscar Robertson Trophy.

Pauley Pavilion

Los Angeleshomein Los Angeles
On November 27, 1965, the freshman team, led by Alcindor, defeated the varsity 75–60 in the first game in the new Pauley Pavilion.
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, then known as Lew Alcindor, was recruited to UCLA partly on the promise of playing in the new arena.

Hook shot

skyhooksky hookhookshot
Using his trademark "skyhook" shot, he established himself as one of the league's top scorers.
The hook shot later became a staple of many players in the National Basketball Association, including notable stars such as George Mikan, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Magic Johnson, and Yao Ming.

1969–70 Milwaukee Bucks season

MilwaukeeMilwaukee BucksMIL
The Harlem Globetrotters offered Alcindor $1 million to play for them, but he declined and was picked first in the 1969 NBA draft by the Milwaukee Bucks, who were in only their second season of existence.
Led by the heralded rookie center Lew Alcindor, they finished with a 56–26 record, enough for second place in the Eastern Division.

Jack Donohue (basketball)

Jack DonohueJohn DonohueJack Donahue
Alcindor began his record-breaking basketball accomplishments when he was in high school, where he led coach Jack Donahue's Power Memorial Academy team to three straight New York City Catholic championships, a 71-game winning streak, and a 79–2 overall record.
At Power Memorial, Donohue had a career win-loss record of 163–30, including winning 71 straight games with the star center of his team, Lew Alcindor (later known as Kareem Abdul-Jabbar).