Karel Kramář

Dr. Karel KramářKarel Kramá
Karel Kramář (27 December 1860 – 26 May 1937) was a Czech politician.wikipedia
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Edvard Beneš

BenešPresident BenešBeneš, Edvard
Although he remained a member of the National Assembly until his death in 1937, his conservative nationalism was out of tune with the main political establishment, represented by the figures of T.G. Masaryk and Edvard Beneš.
On 31 October 1918, Karel Kramář reported from Geneva to Prague: "If you saw our Dr. Beneš and his mastery of global questions...you would take off your hat and say it was truly marvelous!"

Czechoslovakia

CzechoslovakCzechTCH
He became the leader of the Young Czech Party in Austria-Hungary and later of the National Democratic Party in Czechoslovakia.
An advocate of democratic reform and Czech autonomy within Austria-Hungary, Masaryk was elected twice to the Reichsrat (Austrian Parliament), first from 1891 to 1893 for the Young Czech Party, and again from 1907 to 1914 for the Czech Realist Party, which he had founded in 1889 with Karel Kramář and Josef Kaizl.

Young Czech Party

Young CzechEdvard GrégrJulius Grégr
He became the leader of the Young Czech Party in Austria-Hungary and later of the National Democratic Party in Czechoslovakia. He was a representative of the major Czech political party, the Young Czechs, in the Austrian Imperial Council from 1891 to 1915 (where he was also known as Karl Kramarsch), becoming the party leader in 1897.
In February 1918, the party formally merged with a new coalition, the Czech State Right Democratic Party, which later, under the Republic, became the party of Czechoslovak National Democracy headed by Karel Kramář.

Vysoké nad Jizerou

He was born in Vysoké nad Jizerou (Hochstadt an der Iser), near the northern border of what is now the Czech Republic, in a rich family.

Czechoslovak National Democracy

National DemocracyNational Democratic PartyNational Democrats
He became the leader of the Young Czech Party in Austria-Hungary and later of the National Democratic Party in Czechoslovakia.
The party was established in 1918 by a merger of the Free-minded National Party ("Young Czechs") and several smaller parties, and was initially known as the Czech Constitutional Democratic Party. It formed the first provisional government led by Karel Kramář, and the following year it was renamed the National Democracy.

Jiří Stříbrný

STŘIBRNÝ, Jiří (Ferdinand)
Later, Kramář worked together with Jiří Stříbrný and František Mareš in the National Union (Národní sjednocení). As part of the effort to marginalize Kramář, Masaryk and Beneš started to promote a historical narrative which portrayed "the resistance abroad" in World War I as the "true" liberators and the founders of the republic while the "domestic resistance" were disparaged as collaborators with the House of Habsburg.
In the 1930s, he worked with Karel Kramář in the National Union (Národní sjednocení), which also included the likes of František Mareš.

Neo-Slavism

neo-Slavicneoslavism
*Neo-Slavism
Notable thinkers of the movement included Roman Dmowski, a Pole, and Karel Kramář, a Czech.

Old Czech Party

Old Czech
In February 1918, the party formally merged with a new coalition, the Czech State Right Democratic Party, which later, under the Republic, became the party of Czechoslovak National Democracy headed by former Young Czech leader Karel Kramář.

Czechs

CzechBohemianCzech people
Karel Kramář (27 December 1860 – 26 May 1937) was a Czech politician.

Imperial Council (Austria)

Imperial CouncilReichsratHerrenhaus
He was a representative of the major Czech political party, the Young Czechs, in the Austrian Imperial Council from 1891 to 1915 (where he was also known as Karl Kramarsch), becoming the party leader in 1897.

World War I

First World WarGreat WarFirst
During the First World War, Kramář was imprisoned for treason against Austria-Hungary but later released under an amnesty.

Austria-Hungary

Austro-HungarianAustro-Hungarian EmpireAustrian
He became the leader of the Young Czech Party in Austria-Hungary and later of the National Democratic Party in Czechoslovakia. During the First World War, Kramář was imprisoned for treason against Austria-Hungary but later released under an amnesty. A liberal nationalist with close ties to the political elite in Prague and Vienna, Kramář pursued a policy of cooperation with the Austrian state as the best means of achieving Czech national goals before the First World War, even as he favored closer ties between the Czechs and the Russian Empire.

Czech Republic

🇨🇿CzechCZE
He was born in Vysoké nad Jizerou (Hochstadt an der Iser), near the northern border of what is now the Czech Republic, in a rich family.

Charles University

University of PraguePragueCharles University in Prague
In the 1880s, Kramář played a prominent role in the agitation against the fact that Charles-Ferdinand University (now Charles University) in Prague offered instructions almost exclusively in German; demands were made for a Czech language university so that Czech students could be educated in their own language.

Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk

MasarykTomáš MasarykT. G. Masaryk
Although he remained a member of the National Assembly until his death in 1937, his conservative nationalism was out of tune with the main political establishment, represented by the figures of T.G. Masaryk and Edvard Beneš.

October Manifesto

manifestoManifesto of October 17Tsar's Manifesto of October 17, 1905
The October Manifesto of 1905 was hailed by Kramář as a sign that Russia was liberalizing and would soon become a democratic power in the near-future.

Robert William Seton-Watson

R. W. Seton-WatsonR.W. Seton-WatsonSeton-Watson, R.W.
Kramář had little love for the House of Habsburg, which as the British historian R.W. Seton-Watson observed that for more than 500 years had showed nothing but "detestation" of the Czech people, but he was willing to accept that the Czechs remain part of the Austrian Empire, provided that the empire was reorganized to give greater autonomy to the "Czech lands" that consisted of the provinces of Bohemia, Moravia, and Silesia.

Prague

PrahaPrague, Czech RepublicPrag
A liberal nationalist with close ties to the political elite in Prague and Vienna, Kramář pursued a policy of cooperation with the Austrian state as the best means of achieving Czech national goals before the First World War, even as he favored closer ties between the Czechs and the Russian Empire.

Vienna

VienneseVienna, AustriaWien
A liberal nationalist with close ties to the political elite in Prague and Vienna, Kramář pursued a policy of cooperation with the Austrian state as the best means of achieving Czech national goals before the First World War, even as he favored closer ties between the Czechs and the Russian Empire.

Russian Empire

RussiaRussianImperial Russia
A liberal nationalist with close ties to the political elite in Prague and Vienna, Kramář pursued a policy of cooperation with the Austrian state as the best means of achieving Czech national goals before the First World War, even as he favored closer ties between the Czechs and the Russian Empire.

House of Romanov

Holstein-Gottorp-RomanovRomanovRussian Imperial Family
On 3 May 1915, Kramář told the Agrarian deputy in the Reichsrat Josef Dürich who was about to go abroad to seek Allied support for independence that he should seek a "great Slav empire" under the House of Romanov in which Bohemia would be an autonomous kingdom ruled by some Romanov grand duke.

Treason

traitortraitorshigh treason
During the First World War the Austrian authorities charged Kramář with treason, tried him and ultimately sentenced him to 15 years of hard labour.

Penal labour

hard labourpenal servitudehard labor
During the First World War the Austrian authorities charged Kramář with treason, tried him and ultimately sentenced him to 15 years of hard labour.