Karlheinz Stockhausen

StockhausenStockhausen, KarlheinzControversyKarheinz StockhausenStockhausen calling 9/11 a work of artStockhausensStockhausen’sStockhausian
Karlheinz Stockhausen (22 August 1928 – 5 December 2007) was a German composer, widely acknowledged by critics as one of the most important but also controversial composers of the 20th and early 21st centuries.wikipedia
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Mittwoch aus Licht

MittwochOrchester-FinalistenBassetsu
This arrangement allowed him to extend his notational innovations (for example, dynamics in Weltparlament [the first scene of Mittwoch aus Licht] are coded in colour) and resulted in eight German Music Publishers Society Awards between 1992 (Luzifers Tanz) and 2005 (Hoch-Zeiten, from Sonntag aus Licht) . The Momente score, published just before Stockhausen's death in 2007, won this prize for the ninth time.
Mittwoch aus Licht (English: Wednesday from Light) is an opera by Karlheinz Stockhausen in a greeting, four scenes, and a farewell.

Darmstadt School

Internationale Ferienkurse für Neue MusikDarmstadtDarmstadt International Summer Courses for New Music
One of the leading figures of the Darmstadt School, his compositions and theories were and remain widely influential, not only on composers of art music, but also on jazz and popular music.
Coined by Luigi Nono in his 1958 lecture "Die Entwicklung der Reihentechnik", Darmstadt School describes the uncompromisingly serial music written by composers such as Pierre Boulez, Bruno Maderna, Karlheinz Stockhausen (the three composers Nono specifically names in his lecture, along with himself), Luciano Berio, Earle Brown, John Cage, Aldo Clementi, Franco Donatoni, Niccolò Castiglioni, Franco Evangelisti, Karel Goeyvaerts, Mauricio Kagel, Gottfried Michael Koenig, Giacomo Manzoni, and Henri Pousseur from 1951 to 1961, and even composers who never actually attended Darmstadt, such as Jean Barraqué and Iannis Xenakis.

Die Reihe

Together with Eimert, Stockhausen edited the journal Die Reihe from 1955 to 1962.
Die Reihe was a German-language music journal, edited by Herbert Eimert and Karlheinz Stockhausen and published by Universal Edition (Vienna) between 1955 and 1962 . An English edition was published, under the original German title, between 1957 and 1968 by the Theodore Presser Company (Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania), in association with Universal Edition (London) . A related book series titled Bücher der Reihe was begun, but only one title ever appeared in it, Herbert Eimert's Grundlagen der musikalischen Reihentechnik.

Kerpen

BuirKerpen and LommersumKerpen, Germany
The village, located near Kerpen in the Cologne region, was displaced in 1956 to make way for lignite strip mining, but the castle itself still stands.
Karlheinz Stockhausen (22 August 1928 – 5 December 2007), pioneer of electronic music composition, was born in the quarter of Mödrath.

Drei Lieder (Stockhausen)

Drei Lieder
His early student compositions remained out of the public eye until, in 1971, he published Chöre für Doris, Drei Lieder for alto voice and chamber orchestra, Choral for a cappella choir (all three from 1950), and a Sonatine for Violin and Piano (1951).
Drei Lieder (Three Songs), for alto voice and chamber orchestra, is a song cycle by Karlheinz Stockhausen, written while he was still a conservatory student in 1950.

Kreuzspiel

Compositions from this phase include Kreuzspiel (1951), the Klavierstücke I–IV (1952—the fourth of this first set of four Klavierstücke, titled Klavierstück IV, is specifically cited by Stockhausen as an example of "punctual music" ), and the first (unpublished) versions of Punkte and Kontra-Punkte (1952).
Kreuzspiel (Crossplay) is a composition by Karlheinz Stockhausen written for oboe, bass clarinet, piano and four percussionists in 1951 (it was later revised for just three percussionists, along with other changes).

Hochschule für Musik und Tanz Köln

Cologne ConservatoryHochschule für MusikMusikhochschule
He was educated at the Hochschule für Musik Köln and the University of Cologne, later studying with Olivier Messiaen in Paris and with Werner Meyer-Eppler at the University of Bonn.
Karlheinz Stockhausen

Punkte

Compositions from this phase include Kreuzspiel (1951), the Klavierstücke I–IV (1952—the fourth of this first set of four Klavierstücke, titled Klavierstück IV, is specifically cited by Stockhausen as an example of "punctual music" ), and the first (unpublished) versions of Punkte and Kontra-Punkte (1952).
Punkte (Points) is an orchestral composition by Karlheinz Stockhausen, given the work number ½ in his catalogue of works.

Musical composition

compositionmusic compositioncomposing
He had training in harmony and counterpoint, the latter with Hermann Schroeder, but he did not develop a real interest in composition until 1950.
Examples range from 20th century avant-garde music that uses graphic notation, to text compositions such as Karlheinz Stockhausen's Aus den sieben Tagen, to computer programs that select sounds for musical pieces.

Studio for Electronic Music (WDR)

Studio for Electronic MusicElectronic Music Studioelectronic studio
In 2017, an anonymous patron purchased the house and opened it in April 2017 as an exhibition space for modern art, with the first floor to be used as the permanent home of the museum of the WDR Electronic Music Studio, where Stockhausen had worked from 1953 until shortly before WDR closed the studio in 2000.
Messiaen had two students in Paris who took up his thoughts and from then on were the best-known representatives of serial music—as it was called—Pierre Boulez and Karlheinz Stockhausen.

Anton Webern

WebernWebern, AntonWebernian
He often departs radically from musical tradition and his work is influenced by Olivier Messiaen, Edgard Varèse, and Anton Webern, as well as by film and by painters such as Piet Mondrian and Paul Klee.
His innovations in schematic organization of pitch, rhythm, register, timbre, dynamics, articulation, and melodic contour; his eagerness to redefine imitative contrapuntal techniques such as canon and fugue; and his inclination toward athematicism, abstraction, and lyricism all greatly informed and oriented intra- and post-war European, typically serial or avant-garde composers such as Olivier Messiaen, Pierre Boulez, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Luigi Nono, Bruno Maderna, Henri Pousseur, and György Ligeti.

Sonatine (Stockhausen)

SonatineSonatinaSonatine for violin and piano
His early student compositions remained out of the public eye until, in 1971, he published Chöre für Doris, Drei Lieder for alto voice and chamber orchestra, Choral for a cappella choir (all three from 1950), and a Sonatine for Violin and Piano (1951).
The Sonatine (Sonatina) for violin and piano is a chamber-music composition by Karlheinz Stockhausen, written while he was still a student in 1951.

Chöre für Doris

His early student compositions remained out of the public eye until, in 1971, he published Chöre für Doris, Drei Lieder for alto voice and chamber orchestra, Choral for a cappella choir (all three from 1950), and a Sonatine for Violin and Piano (1951).
Chöre für Doris (Choruses for Doris), after poems by Paul Verlaine, is a three-movement a cappella choral composition by Karlheinz Stockhausen, written in 1950 and later given the number 1/11 in the composer's catalogue of works.

Zeitmaße

Zeitmasze
His position as "the leading German composer of his generation" was established with Gesang der Jünglinge and three concurrently composed pieces in different media: Zeitmaße for five woodwinds, Gruppen for three orchestras, and Klavierstück XI . The principles underlying the latter three compositions are presented in Stockhausen's best-known theoretical article, ". . . wie die Zeit vergeht . . ."
Zeitmaße (German for "Time Measures") for five woodwinds (flute, oboe, cor anglais, clarinet, and bassoon, composed 1955–56) is a chamber-music work by German composer Karlheinz Stockhausen, and is Number 5 in the composer's catalog.

Plus-Minus (Stockhausen)

Plus-MinusPlus MinusPlus-Minus'' (Stockhausen)
In 1963, Stockhausen created Plus-Minus, "2 × 7 pages for realisation" containing basic note materials and a complex system of transformations to which those materials are to be subjected in order to produce an unlimited number of different compositions.
Plus-Minus, 2 × 7 pages for realisation, is a composition for one or several performers by Karlheinz Stockhausen, first written in 1963 and redrafted in 1974.

Studie II

Elektronische Studie IIElectronic StudiesSecond Electronic Study
In March 1953, he moved to the NWDR studio in Cologne and turned to electronic music with two Electronic Studies (1953 and 1954), and then introducing spatial placements of sound sources with his mixed concrète and electronic work Gesang der Jünglinge (1955–56).
Studie II (Study II) is an electronic music composition by Karlheinz Stockhausen from the year 1954 and, together with his Studie I, comprises his work number ("opus") 3.

Ylem (Stockhausen)

Ylem
Some of his later works, such as Ylem (1972) and the first three parts of Herbstmusik (1974), also fall under this rubric.
Ylem is a composition by Karlheinz Stockhausen for a variable ensemble of 19 or more players, and is given the work number 37 in his catalogue of compositions.

Herbstmusik

Some of his later works, such as Ylem (1972) and the first three parts of Herbstmusik (1974), also fall under this rubric.
Herbstmusik (Autumn Music) is a music-theatre work for four performers composed by Karlheinz Stockhausen in 1974.

Spiral (Stockhausen)

SpiralSpiral'' (Stockhausen)
Through the rest of the 1960s, he continued to explore such possibilities of "process composition" in works for live performance, such as Prozession (1967), Kurzwellen, and Spiral (both 1968), culminating in the verbally described "intuitive music" compositions of Aus den sieben Tagen (1968) and Für kommende Zeiten (1968–70).
Spiral (Spiral [adj.], Spirally), for a soloist with a shortwave receiver, is a composition by Karlheinz Stockhausen, written in 1968.

Chamber music

chamberchamber ensemblechamber works
In addition to electronic music—both with and without live performers—they range from miniatures for musical boxes through works for solo instruments, songs, chamber music, choral and orchestral music, to a cycle of seven full-length operas.
Since the invention of electrical telecommunication devices in the 19th century, players of a string quartet can even conduct a conversation when they are flying over the audience in four separate helicopters, as in the Helicopter String Quartet by Karlheinz Stockhausen.

Für kommende Zeiten

Through the rest of the 1960s, he continued to explore such possibilities of "process composition" in works for live performance, such as Prozession (1967), Kurzwellen, and Spiral (both 1968), culminating in the verbally described "intuitive music" compositions of Aus den sieben Tagen (1968) and Für kommende Zeiten (1968–70).
Für kommende Zeiten (For Times to Come) is a collection of seventeen text compositions by Karlheinz Stockhausen, composed between August 1968 and July 1970.

Graphic notation (music)

graphic notationgraphic scoresgraphic score
In Zyklus (1959), for example, he began using graphic notation for instrumental music.
Examples of the former include Feldman's Projection and Stockhausen's Prozession.

Fresco (Stockhausen)

FrescoFresco'' (Stockhausen)
In the following year, he created Fresco for four orchestral groups, a Wandelmusik ("foyer music") composition.
Fresco ("wall sounds for meditation") is an orchestral composition written in 1969 by the German composer Karlheinz Stockhausen as foyer music for an evening-long retrospective programme of his music presented simultaneously in three auditoriums of the Beethovenhalle in Bonn.

Mixtur

Mixtur 2003
He pioneered live electronics in Mixtur (1964/67/2003) for orchestra and electronics, Mikrophonie I (1964) for tam-tam, two microphones, two filters with potentiometers (6 players), Mikrophonie II (1965) for choir, Hammond organ, and four ring modulators, and Solo for a melody instrument with feedback (1966).
Mixtur, for orchestra, 4 sine-wave generators, and 4 ring modulators, is an orchestral composition by the German composer Karlheinz Stockhausen, written in 1964, and is Nr. 16 in his catalogue of works.

Kurzwellen

Through the rest of the 1960s, he continued to explore such possibilities of "process composition" in works for live performance, such as Prozession (1967), Kurzwellen, and Spiral (both 1968), culminating in the verbally described "intuitive music" compositions of Aus den sieben Tagen (1968) and Für kommende Zeiten (1968–70).
Kurzwellen (Short Waves), for six players with shortwave radio receivers and live electronics, is a composition by Karlheinz Stockhausen, written in 1968.