Kashmiri language

KashmiriKoshurHindikasKashmiri (Koshur)Kashmiri alphabetKashmiri-speakingKashmiri/KoshurKashmirian
Kashmiri or Koshur, is a language from the Dardic subgroup of Indo-Aryan languages, spoken by around 7 million Kashmiris, primarily in the Indian territory of Jammu and Kashmir.wikipedia
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Kashmiris

KashmiriKashmiri peopleKashmir
Kashmiri or Koshur, is a language from the Dardic subgroup of Indo-Aryan languages, spoken by around 7 million Kashmiris, primarily in the Indian territory of Jammu and Kashmir.
The Kashmiris are an ethnic group native to the Kashmir Valley, in the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir, who speak Kashmiri, an Indo-Aryan Dardic language.

Dardic languages

DardicDardic languageKohistani
Kashmiri or Koshur, is a language from the Dardic subgroup of Indo-Aryan languages, spoken by around 7 million Kashmiris, primarily in the Indian territory of Jammu and Kashmir.
Kashmiri/Koshur is the most prominent Dardic language, with an established literary tradition and official recognition as one of the official languages of India.

Languages with official status in India

official languages of Indiaofficial languagesEighth Schedule
Although the official language of Jammu and Kashmir is Urdu, Kashmiri is recognised as a regional language in the state and is also among the 22 scheduled languages of India.

Kashmir Valley

KashmirVale of KashmirKashmir Division
Most Kashmiri speakers are located in the Kashmir Valley and Chenab Valley of Jammu and Kashmir.
The principal spoken languages in the valley are Kashmiri and Urdu, with Urdu being the official language.

Kashmiri diaspora

KashmiriKashmiri Canadians
There are about 6.8 million speakers of Kashmiri and related dialects in Jammu and Kashmir and amongst the Kashmiri diaspora in other states of India.
However, the Census report stated that only 3% of Kashmiris settled in Punjab retained their Kashmiri language.

Azad Kashmir

Azad Jammu and KashmirAzad Jammu & KashmirKashmir
There are also speakers in parts of the neighbouring Pakistani territory of Azad Kashmir.
There are also sizeable communities speaking Gujari and Kashmiri, as well as pockets of speakers of Shina, Pashto and Kundal Shahi.

Neelum District

Neelam ValleyNeelum ValleyNeelam
There are also about 130,000 speakers in the Pakistani territory of Azad Kashmir, primary concentrated in the Neelam and Leepa valleys, and in the district of Haveli.
The second most widely spoken language of the Neelam Valley is Kashmiri.

Arabic script

ArabicPerso-Arabic scriptPerso-Arabic
There are three orthographical systems used to write the Kashmiri language: the Sharada script, the Devanagari script and the Perso-Arabic script.
In the cases of Bosnian, Kurdish, Kashmiri and Uyghur writing systems, vowels are mandatory.

Sharada script

SharadaŚāradāŚāradā script
There are three orthographical systems used to write the Kashmiri language: the Sharada script, the Devanagari script and the Perso-Arabic script. The Kashmiri language is traditionally written in the Sharada script after the 8th Century A.D. This script however, is not in common use today, except for religious ceremonies of the Kashmiri Pandits.
The script was in widespread use between the 8th and 12th centuries in the northwestern parts of India (in Kashmir and neighbouring areas), for writing Sanskrit and Kashmiri.

Leepa Valley

Leepa
There are also about 130,000 speakers in the Pakistani territory of Azad Kashmir, primary concentrated in the Neelam and Leepa valleys, and in the district of Haveli.
The main language which is spoken in the valley is Kashmiri, followed by Hindko, Pahari-Pothwari and Gojari.

Chenab valley

Chenab region
Most Kashmiri speakers are located in the Kashmir Valley and Chenab Valley of Jammu and Kashmir.
Among the languages spoken in Chenab Valley are the following: Kashmiri, and its dialects Rambani, Pogali, Kishtwari and Serazi is the most widely spoken language in the region.

Fusional language

fusionalinflected languageinflected
Kashmiri is a fusional language with verb-second (V2) word order.
Examples of fusional Indo-European languages are: Kashmiri, Sanskrit, Pashto, New Indo-Aryan languages such as Punjabi, Hindustani, Bengali; Greek (classical and modern), Latin, Italian, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Irish, German, Faroese, Icelandic, Albanian, all Baltic and Slavic languages.

States of India by Kashmiri speakers

This is a list of States and Union Territories of India by speakers of Kashmiri as of census 2001.

Indo-Aryan languages

Indo-AryanIndo-Aryan languageIndic
Kashmiri or Koshur, is a language from the Dardic subgroup of Indo-Aryan languages, spoken by around 7 million Kashmiris, primarily in the Indian territory of Jammu and Kashmir.
Alveolar as an additional point of articulation occurs in Marathi and Konkani where dialect mixture and others factors upset the aforementioned complementation to produce minimal environments, in some West Pahari dialects through internal developments, and in Kashmiri.

Kashmiri Pandit

Kashmiri PanditsKashmiri HindusPandits
The Kashmiri language is traditionally written in the Sharada script after the 8th Century A.D. This script however, is not in common use today, except for religious ceremonies of the Kashmiri Pandits.

Devanagari

DevanāgarīDevanagari scriptDevnagari
There are three orthographical systems used to write the Kashmiri language: the Sharada script, the Devanagari script and the Perso-Arabic script.
Among the languages using it – as either their only script or one of their scripts – are Pāḷi, Sanskrit, Hindi, Nepali, Sherpa, Prakrit, Apabhramsha, Awadhi, Bhojpuri, Braj Bhasha, Chhattisgarhi, Haryanvi, Magahi, Nagpuri, Rajasthani, Bhili, Dogri, Marathi, Maithili, Kashmiri, Konkani, Sindhi, Bodo, Nepalbhasa, Mundari and Santali.

Peter E. Hook

Hook, Peter E.
His chief contributions are The Compound Verb in Hindi and numerous articles on the compound verb and other syntactic and semantic phenomena in western Indo-Aryan languages and dialects spoken in North India, West India, and Pakistan: Kashmiri, Marathi, Gujarati, Rajasthani, Shina, and Sanskrit.

Proto-Indo-European pronouns

pronounsIndo-European rootk w o-
The Indo-European root for this is reconstructed as *eǵHom, which is preserved in Sanskrit as aham and in Avestan Persian as azam.

Konkani language

KonkaniGoan KonkaniMangalorean Konkani
Other Indo-Aryan languages that preserve this feature include Dogri (aun vs me-), Gujarati (hu-n vs ma-ri), Konkani (hā̃v vs mhazo), and Braj (hau-M vs mai-M).
The influence of Paisachi over Konkani can be proved in the findings of Dr. Taraporewala, who in his book Elements of Science of Languages (Calcutta University) ascertained that Konkani showed many Dardic features that are found in present-day Kashmiri.

Pakistan

Islamic Republic of PakistanPAKPakistani
Various languages such as Shina, Balti, and Burushaski are spoken in Gilgit-Baltistan, whilst languages such as Pahari, Gojri, and Kashmiri are spoken by many in Azad Kashmir.

Jammu and Kashmir

Jammu & KashmirKashmirJ&K
Kashmiri or Koshur, is a language from the Dardic subgroup of Indo-Aryan languages, spoken by around 7 million Kashmiris, primarily in the Indian territory of Jammu and Kashmir.

Urdu

Urdu languageUrdu:Hindi
Although the official language of Jammu and Kashmir is Urdu, Kashmiri is recognised as a regional language in the state and is also among the 22 scheduled languages of India.

Split ergativity

split-ergativesplit ergativesplit-ergativity
Kashmiri has split ergativity and the unusual verb-second word order.

V2 word order

verb-secondV2verb-second word order
Kashmiri is a fusional language with verb-second (V2) word order. Kashmiri has split ergativity and the unusual verb-second word order.