Katabasis

descent to the underworldkatabaticcatabasisdescent into the Underworldjourney to the underworlda journeydescended to helldescends to the netherworlddescent to the netherworlddescents to the underworld
Katabasis or catabasis (, from κατὰ "down" and βαίνω "go") is a descent of some type, such as moving downhill, the sinking of the winds or sun, a military retreat, a trip to the underworld, or a trip from the interior of a country down to the coast.wikipedia
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Underworld

netherworldrealm of the deadNether World
Katabasis or catabasis (, from κατὰ "down" and βαίνω "go") is a descent of some type, such as moving downhill, the sinking of the winds or sun, a military retreat, a trip to the underworld, or a trip from the interior of a country down to the coast. Several scholars, including Allan Bloom, have read this first word, κατέβην ("I went down") as an allusion to Odysseus' journey into the Underworld.
Common features of underworld myths are accounts of living people making journeys to the underworld, often for some heroic purpose.

Nekyia

Nekuiaoracle of the deadsummons the spirit
Most katabases take place in a supernatural underworld, such as Hades or Hell — as in Nekyia, the 11th book of the Odyssey, which describes Odysseus's descent to the Underworld.
A nekyia is not necessarily the same thing as a katabasis.

Charon

CaronteCharon (mythology)Charos
Next, Aeneas encounters Charon, the ferryman who leads souls into the Underworld, and the mass of people who are unburied.
In the catabasis mytheme, heroes – such as Aeneas, Dionysus, Heracles, Hermes, Odysseus, Orpheus, Pirithous, Psyche, Theseus and Sisyphus – journey to the underworld and return, still alive, conveyed by the boat of Charon.

Robert Bly

Bly, RobertJohn ''[sic]'' BlyRobert Elwood Bly
Author Robert Bly proposes in his book Iron John: A Book About Men several reasons for the "catabasis phenomenon", amongst them the lack of Western initiation rites and the lack of strong father figures and role models.
In contrast to the continual pursuit of higher achievements, that is constantly taught to young men today, the theme of spiritual descent (often being referred to by its Greek term κατάβασις) which is to be found in many of these myths, is presented as a necessary step for coming in contact with the deeper aspects of the masculine self and achieving its full potential.

Odyssey

The OdysseyHomer's OdysseyHomer's ''Odyssey
Most katabases take place in a supernatural underworld, such as Hades or Hell — as in Nekyia, the 11th book of the Odyssey, which describes Odysseus's descent to the Underworld.
The first canto of Ezra Pound's The Cantos (1917) is both a translation and a retelling of Odysseus' journey to the underworld.

Iron John: A Book About Men

Iron John
Author Robert Bly proposes in his book Iron John: A Book About Men several reasons for the "catabasis phenomenon", amongst them the lack of Western initiation rites and the lack of strong father figures and role models.
He considered Iron John to be an archetype of the Self, and the hero’s interactions with him to represent a katabasis, or exploratory journey into the inner depths, where new sources of positive masculine sexuality could be found and tapped.

Anabasis

Anabasis (disambiguation)anabatos
The term catabasis can refer to a trip from the interior of a country down to the coast (for example, following a river), in contrast to the term "anabasis", which refers to an expedition from a coastline up into the interior of a country.

Orpheus

Orphic HymnsOrfeoOrphic
In Greek mythology, for example, Orpheus enters the Underworld in order to bring Eurydice back to the world of the living.

Harrowing of Hell

Descent into HellChrist's descent into helldescending into Hell
His descent to the underworld is alluded to in the New Testament in, which states that the "good tidings were proclaimed to the dead".

Cupid and Psyche

PsycheEros and PsycheAmor and Psyche
The last trial Venus imposes on Psyche is a quest to the underworld itself.

Inanna

IshtarIštarInana
Two different versions of the story of Inanna-Ishtar's descent into the Underworld have survived: a Sumerian version dating to the Third Dynasty of Ur (ETCSL 1.4.1) and a clearly derivative Akkadian version from the early second millennium BC.

Dionysus

BacchusDionysosDionysiac
Pausanias, in book II of his Description of Greece, describes two variant traditions regarding Dionysus' katabasis, or descent into the underworld.

Strait of Magellan

Straits of MagellanMagellan StraitMagellan Straits
The Strait of Magellan and the Aleutian Islands are prone to the existence of Williwaws, that is "a sudden violent, cold, katabatic gust of wind descending from a mountainous coast of high latitudes to the sea."
The strait is prone to Williwaws, "a sudden violent, cold, katabatic gust of wind descending from a mountainous coast of high latitudes to the sea".

Oxford English Dictionary

OEDOxford DictionaryThe Oxford English Dictionary
The main meaning given for catabasis by the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) describes "A going down; a military retreat, in allusion to that of the ten thousand Greeks under Xenophon, related by him in his Anabasis:

Xenophon

Xenophon of AthensXen.Constitution of the Lacedemonians
The main meaning given for catabasis by the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) describes "A going down; a military retreat, in allusion to that of the ten thousand Greeks under Xenophon, related by him in his Anabasis:

Anabasis (Xenophon)

AnabasisThe AnabasisAnabasis'' (Xenophon)
The main meaning given for catabasis by the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) describes "A going down; a military retreat, in allusion to that of the ten thousand Greeks under Xenophon, related by him in his Anabasis:

Plato

Plato's dialoguesDialogues of PlatoPlatonic dialogues
In the opening of Plato's Republic, Socrates recounts "going down" to the port city of Piraeus, located south of his native Athens.

Republic

constitutional republicrepublicsrepublican form of government
In the opening of Plato's Republic, Socrates recounts "going down" to the port city of Piraeus, located south of his native Athens.

Socrates

SocraticSokratesSocrate
In the opening of Plato's Republic, Socrates recounts "going down" to the port city of Piraeus, located south of his native Athens.

Piraeus

Piraeus, GreecePireusPireaus
In the opening of Plato's Republic, Socrates recounts "going down" to the port city of Piraeus, located south of his native Athens.

Athens

Athens, GreeceAthenianAthenians
In the opening of Plato's Republic, Socrates recounts "going down" to the port city of Piraeus, located south of his native Athens.

Allan Bloom

Bloom, AllanAllan David Bloom
Several scholars, including Allan Bloom, have read this first word, κατέβην ("I went down") as an allusion to Odysseus' journey into the Underworld.

Odysseus

UlyssesUlisseKing of Ithaca
Most katabases take place in a supernatural underworld, such as Hades or Hell — as in Nekyia, the 11th book of the Odyssey, which describes Odysseus's descent to the Underworld. Several scholars, including Allan Bloom, have read this first word, κατέβην ("I went down") as an allusion to Odysseus' journey into the Underworld.

Poetry

poempoetpoems
In poetry and rhetoric, the term katabasis refers to a "gradual descending" of emphasis on a theme within a sentence or paragraph, while anabasis refers to a gradual ascending in emphasis.

Rhetoric

rhetoricianrhetorrhetorical
In poetry and rhetoric, the term katabasis refers to a "gradual descending" of emphasis on a theme within a sentence or paragraph, while anabasis refers to a gradual ascending in emphasis.