Katabatic wind

katabatic windsdownslope winddownslopingCatabatic windcold valley air sinkingdownslopefall windfallwindkatabatickatabatic drainage
A katabatic wind (named from the Greek word κατάβασις katabasis, meaning "descending") is the technical name for a drainage wind, a wind that carries high-density air from a higher elevation down a slope under the force of gravity.wikipedia
116 Related Articles

Bora (wind)

borabora windbura
Examples of true katabatic winds include the bora (or bura) in the Adriatic, the Bohemian Wind or Böhmwind in the Ore Mountains, the Santa Ana in southern California, the piteraq winds of Greenland, and the oroshi in Japan.
The bora is a northern to north-eastern katabatic wind in the Adriatic Sea.

Foehn wind

föhnfoehnföhn wind
For instance, winds such as the föhn and chinook are rain shadow winds where air driven upslope on the windward side of a mountain range drops its moisture and descends leeward drier and warmer.

Bohemian wind

BöhmBöhm (wind)
Examples of true katabatic winds include the bora (or bura) in the Adriatic, the Bohemian Wind or Böhmwind in the Ore Mountains, the Santa Ana in southern California, the piteraq winds of Greenland, and the oroshi in Japan.
The Bohemian wind or böhm (Böhmwind or Böhmischer Wind) is a katabatic downslope wind, which occurs in East Bavaria, eastern Upper Franconia, the Vogtland, the Ore Mountains, Upper Lusatia, the Sudetes and the Austrian Granite and Gneiss Highland.

Santa Ana winds

Santa Ana windSanta AnaSanta Anas
Examples of true katabatic winds include the bora (or bura) in the Adriatic, the Bohemian Wind or Böhmwind in the Ore Mountains, the Santa Ana in southern California, the piteraq winds of Greenland, and the oroshi in Japan.
The Santa Ana winds are strong, extremely dry downslope winds that originate inland and affect coastal Southern California and northern Baja California.

Piteraq

Examples of true katabatic winds include the bora (or bura) in the Adriatic, the Bohemian Wind or Böhmwind in the Ore Mountains, the Santa Ana in southern California, the piteraq winds of Greenland, and the oroshi in Japan.
A piteraq is a cold katabatic wind which originates on the Greenlandic icecap and sweeps down the east coast.

Oroshi

Examples of true katabatic winds include the bora (or bura) in the Adriatic, the Bohemian Wind or Böhmwind in the Ore Mountains, the Santa Ana in southern California, the piteraq winds of Greenland, and the oroshi in Japan.
This term identifies a katabatic wind.

Chinook wind

chinookchinook windsChinooks
For instance, winds such as the föhn and chinook are rain shadow winds where air driven upslope on the windward side of a mountain range drops its moisture and descends leeward drier and warmer.

Adiabatic process

adiabaticadiabaticallyadiabatic cooling
Since the density of air is inversely proportional to temperature, the air will flow downwards, warming approximately adiabatically as it descends.
Adiabatic heating occurs in the Earth's atmosphere when an air mass descends, for example, in a katabatic wind, Foehn wind, or chinook wind flowing downhill over a mountain range.

McMurdo Dry Valleys

Dry ValleysDry ValleyAntarctic Dry Valleys
In a few regions of continental Antarctica the snow is scoured away by the force of the katabatic winds, leading to "dry valleys" (or "Antarctic oases") such as the McMurdo Dry Valleys.
The unique conditions in the Dry Valleys are caused, in part, by katabatic winds; these occur when cold, dense air is pulled downhill by the force of gravity.

Antarctic oasis

dry valleyssnow-freeAntarctic oases
In a few regions of continental Antarctica the snow is scoured away by the force of the katabatic winds, leading to "dry valleys" (or "Antarctic oases") such as the McMurdo Dry Valleys.
Although these areas are very cold, sufficient solar energy is absorbed by the ground to melt what little snow does fall, or else it is scoured or sublimated by katabatic winds leaving the underlying rock exposed.

Antarctica

AntarcticAntarctic continentReference Elevation Model of Antarctica
Katabatic winds are most commonly found blowing out from the large and elevated ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland.
At the edge of the continent, strong katabatic winds off the polar plateau often blow at storm force.

Blue-ice area

blue ice fieldblue ice" areasareas with no net annual snow accumulation
Other regions may have a similar but lesser effect, leading to "blue ice" areas where the snow is removed and the surface ice sublimates, but is replenished by glacier flow from upstream.
Typical blue-ice areas often feature intense katabatic winds, with average winds reaching 80 km/h and gusts of up to 200 km/h; such winds can remove and take up large amounts of snow.

Williwaw

williwaws
In the Fuegian Archipelago (Tierra del Fuego) in South America as well as in Alaska, a wind known as a williwaw is a particular danger to harboring vessels.
Thus the williwaw is considered a type of katabatic wind.

Valley exit jet

Other meteorological factors acting to increase exit wind speeds are the acceleration of winds originating inside the valley as they travel to lower elevations downvalley, and the process of cold valley air sinking and ejecting into the plain.

Anabatic wind

Upslope windsanabatichill itself
Conversely, Katabatic winds are down-slope winds, frequently produced at night by the opposite effect, the air near to the ground losing heat to it faster than air at a similar altitude over adjacent low-lying land.

Greek language

GreekAncient GreekModern Greek
A katabatic wind (named from the Greek word κατάβασις katabasis, meaning "descending") is the technical name for a drainage wind, a wind that carries high-density air from a higher elevation down a slope under the force of gravity.

Katabasis

descent to the underworldkatabaticcatabasis
A katabatic wind (named from the Greek word κατάβασις katabasis, meaning "descending") is the technical name for a drainage wind, a wind that carries high-density air from a higher elevation down a slope under the force of gravity.

Wind

windsgustsgust
A katabatic wind (named from the Greek word κατάβασις katabasis, meaning "descending") is the technical name for a drainage wind, a wind that carries high-density air from a higher elevation down a slope under the force of gravity.

Knot (unit)

knotsknotkn
Katabatic winds can rush down elevated slopes at hurricane speeds, but most are not as intense as that, and many are 10 knots (18 km/h) or less.

Rain shadow

rainshadowrainshadow effectlow snowfall
For instance, winds such as the föhn and chinook are rain shadow winds where air driven upslope on the windward side of a mountain range drops its moisture and descends leeward drier and warmer.

Windward and leeward

leewardwindwardlee
For instance, winds such as the föhn and chinook are rain shadow winds where air driven upslope on the windward side of a mountain range drops its moisture and descends leeward drier and warmer.

Adriatic Sea

AdriaticAdriatic coastThe Adriatic
Examples of true katabatic winds include the bora (or bura) in the Adriatic, the Bohemian Wind or Böhmwind in the Ore Mountains, the Santa Ana in southern California, the piteraq winds of Greenland, and the oroshi in Japan.

Ore Mountains

ErzgebirgeOre MountainKrušné hory
Examples of true katabatic winds include the bora (or bura) in the Adriatic, the Bohemian Wind or Böhmwind in the Ore Mountains, the Santa Ana in southern California, the piteraq winds of Greenland, and the oroshi in Japan.

Japan

JPNJapaneseJP
Examples of true katabatic winds include the bora (or bura) in the Adriatic, the Bohemian Wind or Böhmwind in the Ore Mountains, the Santa Ana in southern California, the piteraq winds of Greenland, and the oroshi in Japan.

Greymouth

Greymouth, New ZealandMāwheraSt Patrick's School
Another example is "the Barber", an enhanced katabatic wind that blows over the town of Greymouth in New Zealand when there is a southeast flow over the South Island.