Keisuke Kinoshita

Kinoshita KeisukeKeisuke Kinoshita’sKinoshita
Keisuke Kinoshita was a Japanese film director.wikipedia
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Shochiku

ShōchikuShochiku CompanyShochiku Co., Ltd.
His mother secured him an introduction to the Shochiku Kamata studios, where Ozu, Mikio Naruse, and other famous directors worked.
Its best remembered directors include Yasujirō Ozu, Kenji Mizoguchi, Mikio Naruse, Keisuke Kinoshita and Yōji Yamada.

Carmen Comes Home

Throughout his career, Kinoshita made many films that were critically and commercially successful, among which the best known were Morning for the Osone Family (Osone-ke no asa, 1946), Carmen Comes Home (Karumen kokyo ni kaeru, 1951) (made in Fujicolor, the first color feature of Japan ), Tragedy of Japan (Nihon no higeki, 1953), Twenty-Four Eyes (Nijushi no hitomi, 1954), You Were Like a Wild Chrysanthemum (Yagiku no gotoki kimi nariki, 1955), The Ballad of Narayama (Narayama bushi kō, 1958), and The River Fuefuki (Fuefukigawa, 1960).
Carmen Comes Home is a 1951 color Japanese film comedy directed by Keisuke Kinoshita.

The Ballad of Narayama (1958 film)

The Ballad of Narayama1958 filma 1958 film
Throughout his career, Kinoshita made many films that were critically and commercially successful, among which the best known were Morning for the Osone Family (Osone-ke no asa, 1946), Carmen Comes Home (Karumen kokyo ni kaeru, 1951) (made in Fujicolor, the first color feature of Japan ), Tragedy of Japan (Nihon no higeki, 1953), Twenty-Four Eyes (Nijushi no hitomi, 1954), You Were Like a Wild Chrysanthemum (Yagiku no gotoki kimi nariki, 1955), The Ballad of Narayama (Narayama bushi kō, 1958), and The River Fuefuki (Fuefukigawa, 1960).
The Ballad of Narayama is a 1958 Japanese period film directed by Keisuke Kinoshita and based on the 1956 novella of the same name by Shichirō Fukazawa.

Twenty-Four Eyes

Nijushi no hitomi
Throughout his career, Kinoshita made many films that were critically and commercially successful, among which the best known were Morning for the Osone Family (Osone-ke no asa, 1946), Carmen Comes Home (Karumen kokyo ni kaeru, 1951) (made in Fujicolor, the first color feature of Japan ), Tragedy of Japan (Nihon no higeki, 1953), Twenty-Four Eyes (Nijushi no hitomi, 1954), You Were Like a Wild Chrysanthemum (Yagiku no gotoki kimi nariki, 1955), The Ballad of Narayama (Narayama bushi kō, 1958), and The River Fuefuki (Fuefukigawa, 1960).
Twenty-Four Eyes, based on the 1952 novel of the same name by Sakae Tsuboi, is a 1954 Japanese film directed by Keisuke Kinoshita.

Akira Kurosawa

KurosawaKurosawa AkiraAkira Kurosawa Prize
While lesser-known internationally than contemporaries such as Akira Kurosawa, Kenji Mizoguchi and Yasujirō Ozu, he was a household figure in his home country, beloved by both critics and audiences from the 1940s to the 1960s. In 1946 Masaki Kobayashi became his assistant and later formed with him, Akira Kurosawa, and Kon Ichikawa a directors group called Shiki no kai (The Four Horsemen Club).
To his aid came friends and famed directors Keisuke Kinoshita, Masaki Kobayashi and Kon Ichikawa, who together with Kurosawa established in July 1969 a production company called the Club of the Four Knights (Yonki no kai).

Army (1944 film)

ArmyRikugunArmy'' (1944 film)
Army (陸軍 Rikugun) is a 1944 Japanese film directed by Keisuke Kinoshita and starring Chishū Ryū and Kinuyo Tanaka.

Apostasy (1948 film)

ApostasyApostasy'' (1948 film)Hakai'' (film)
Apostasy is a 1948 Japanese film directed by Keisuke Kinoshita.

Masaki Kobayashi

Kobayashi, Masaki
In 1946 Masaki Kobayashi became his assistant and later formed with him, Akira Kurosawa, and Kon Ichikawa a directors group called Shiki no kai (The Four Horsemen Club).
After his release, in 1946, he returned to Shochiku as assistant to the director Keisuke Kinoshita.

A Japanese Tragedy

Tragedy of Japan
Throughout his career, Kinoshita made many films that were critically and commercially successful, among which the best known were Morning for the Osone Family (Osone-ke no asa, 1946), Carmen Comes Home (Karumen kokyo ni kaeru, 1951) (made in Fujicolor, the first color feature of Japan ), Tragedy of Japan (Nihon no higeki, 1953), Twenty-Four Eyes (Nijushi no hitomi, 1954), You Were Like a Wild Chrysanthemum (Yagiku no gotoki kimi nariki, 1955), The Ballad of Narayama (Narayama bushi kō, 1958), and The River Fuefuki (Fuefukigawa, 1960).
A Japanese Tragedy, also known as Tragedy of Japan, is a Japanese film directed by Keisuke Kinoshita and released in 1953.

She Was Like a Wild Chrysanthemum

You Were Like a Wild Chrysanthemum
Throughout his career, Kinoshita made many films that were critically and commercially successful, among which the best known were Morning for the Osone Family (Osone-ke no asa, 1946), Carmen Comes Home (Karumen kokyo ni kaeru, 1951) (made in Fujicolor, the first color feature of Japan ), Tragedy of Japan (Nihon no higeki, 1953), Twenty-Four Eyes (Nijushi no hitomi, 1954), You Were Like a Wild Chrysanthemum (Yagiku no gotoki kimi nariki, 1955), The Ballad of Narayama (Narayama bushi kō, 1958), and The River Fuefuki (Fuefukigawa, 1960).
She Was Like a Wild Chrysanthemum, also known as You Were Like a Wild Chrysanthemum or My First Love Affair, is a Japanese film directed by Keisuke Kinoshita which was initially released in 1955.

Order of the Rising Sun

Grand Cordon of the Order of the Rising SunOrder of the Rising Sun, 4th Class, Gold Rays with RosetteOrder of the Rising Sun, Gold Rays with Neck Ribbon
Kinoshita received the Order of the Rising Sun in 1984 and was awarded the Order of Culture in 1991 by the Japanese government.

Times of Joy and Sorrow

Yorokobi mo kanashimi mo ikutoshitsuki
Times of Joy and Sorrow (USA title) or The Lighthouse (UK title) [Yorokobi mo kanashimi mo ikutoshitsuki ] is a 1957 color Japanese film directed by Keisuke Kinoshita, who shot on location at 11 different lighthouses throughout Japan, including opening scenes at Kannonzaki, the site of the country’s first lighthouse.

63rd Berlin International Film Festival

2013 Berlin International Film Festival2013Berlin film festival
In 2013 five of Kinoshita's films — Jubilation Street (1944), Woman (1948), Engagement Ring (1950), Farewell to Dream (1956) and A Legend or Was It? (1963) — were screened in the Forum section of the 63rd Berlin International Film Festival.

Farewell to Dream

Yūyake Gumo
Farewell to Dream (aka, Clouds at Twilight 夕やけ雲 Yūyake-gumo) is a 1956 Japanese film directed by Keisuke Kinoshita.

Thus Another Day

Thus Another Day is a 1959 color Japanese film directed by Keisuke Kinoshita.

Immortal Love

Kinoshita's 1961 film Immortal Love was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film.
Immortal Love is a 1961 Japanese drama film directed by Keisuke Kinoshita.

The River Fuefuki

Throughout his career, Kinoshita made many films that were critically and commercially successful, among which the best known were Morning for the Osone Family (Osone-ke no asa, 1946), Carmen Comes Home (Karumen kokyo ni kaeru, 1951) (made in Fujicolor, the first color feature of Japan ), Tragedy of Japan (Nihon no higeki, 1953), Twenty-Four Eyes (Nijushi no hitomi, 1954), You Were Like a Wild Chrysanthemum (Yagiku no gotoki kimi nariki, 1955), The Ballad of Narayama (Narayama bushi kō, 1958), and The River Fuefuki (Fuefukigawa, 1960).

Japanese people

JapaneseJapanethnic Japanese
Keisuke Kinoshita was a Japanese film director.

Film director

directordirectedfilm
Keisuke Kinoshita was a Japanese film director.

Kenji Mizoguchi

Mizoguchi KenjiMizoguchiKeiji Mizoguchi
While lesser-known internationally than contemporaries such as Akira Kurosawa, Kenji Mizoguchi and Yasujirō Ozu, he was a household figure in his home country, beloved by both critics and audiences from the 1940s to the 1960s.

Yasujirō Ozu

OzuOzu YasujiroYasujiro Ozu
While lesser-known internationally than contemporaries such as Akira Kurosawa, Kenji Mizoguchi and Yasujirō Ozu, he was a household figure in his home country, beloved by both critics and audiences from the 1940s to the 1960s.

Shizuoka Prefecture

ShizuokaShizuoka, JapanBlack Ship Festival
Born on 5 December 1912 in Hamamatsu, Shizuoka Prefecture, about halfway between Tokyo and Kyoto, to a family who owned a grocery store, Kinoshita was already a movie fan when he was eight.

Mikio Naruse

Naruse MikioMikio Naruse’sNaruse
His mother secured him an introduction to the Shochiku Kamata studios, where Ozu, Mikio Naruse, and other famous directors worked.

Kōzaburō Yoshimura

Kozaburo YoshimuraKimisaburo YoshimuraYoshimura Kozaburo
There, he first worked in the film processing laboratory, then as a camera assistant, before he was advised by Kōzaburō Yoshimura to switch to assistant director.

Fast cutting

fast cutfast cutship hop montage
He pursued severe photographic realism with the long take, long-shot method, and went equally far toward stylization with fast cutting, intricate wipes, tilted cameras, and even classical scroll-painting and Kabuki stage technique.