Ken Thompson

Kenneth Lane ThompsonK. ThompsonKen L. ThompsonKen Thompson (computer programmer)Kenneth Thompson
Kenneth Lane Thompson (born February 4, 1943) is an American pioneer of computer science.wikipedia
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Unix

UNIX operating systemAT&T UnixUnix-like
Thompson worked at Bell Labs for most of his career where he designed and implemented the original Unix operating system. Eventually, the tools developed by Thompson became the Unix operating system: Working on a PDP-7, a team of Bell Labs researchers led by Thompson and Ritchie, and including Rudd Canaday, developed a hierarchical file system, the concepts of computer processes and device files, a command-line interpreter, pipes for easy inter-process communication, and some small utility programs.
Unix (trademarked as UNIX) is a family of multitasking, multiuser computer operating systems that derive from the original AT&T Unix, development starting in the 1970s at the Bell Labs research center by Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and others.

B (programming language)

BB programming languageB language
He also invented the B programming language, the direct predecessor to the C programming language, and was one of the creators and early developers of the Plan 9 operating system.
It is the work of Ken Thompson with Dennis Ritchie.

Plan 9 from Bell Labs

Plan 9Glenda, the Plan 9 BunnyPlan9
He also invented the B programming language, the direct predecessor to the C programming language, and was one of the creators and early developers of the Plan 9 operating system.
The Plan 9 team was initially led by Rob Pike, Ken Thompson, Dave Presotto and Phil Winterbottom, with support from Dennis Ritchie as head of the Computing Techniques Research Department.

UTF-8

65001Unicode (UTF-8)AL32UTF8
Other notable contributions included his work on regular expressions and early computer text editors QED and ed, the definition of the UTF-8 encoding, his work on computer chess that included creation of endgame tablebases and the chess machine Belle.
The encoding is defined by the Unicode Standard, and was originally designed by Ken Thompson and Rob Pike.

Belle (chess machine)

Belle
Other notable contributions included his work on regular expressions and early computer text editors QED and ed, the definition of the UTF-8 encoding, his work on computer chess that included creation of endgame tablebases and the chess machine Belle. Later, along with Joseph Condon, Thompson created the hardware-assisted program Belle, a world champion chess computer.
Belle was a chess computer developed by Joe Condon (hardware) and Ken Thompson (software) at Bell Labs.

Regular expression

regular expressionsregexregexp
Other notable contributions included his work on regular expressions and early computer text editors QED and ed, the definition of the UTF-8 encoding, his work on computer chess that included creation of endgame tablebases and the chess machine Belle.
Among the first appearances of regular expressions in program form was when Ken Thompson built Kleene's notation into the editor QED as a means to match patterns in text files.

Ed (text editor)

eded (programming language)ed editor
Other notable contributions included his work on regular expressions and early computer text editors QED and ed, the definition of the UTF-8 encoding, his work on computer chess that included creation of endgame tablebases and the chess machine Belle.
The ed text editor was one of the first three key elements of the Unix operating system—assembler, editor, and shell—developed by Ken Thompson in August 1969 on a PDP-7 at AT&T Bell Labs.

Bell Labs

Bell LaboratoriesBell Telephone LaboratoriesAT&T Bell Laboratories
Thompson worked at Bell Labs for most of his career where he designed and implemented the original Unix operating system.
In 1969, Dennis Ritchie and Ken Thompson created the computer operating system UNIX for the support of telecommunication switching systems as well as general purpose computing.

Dennis Ritchie

Dennis M. RitchieRitchieDennis MacAlistair Ritchie
In the 1960s at Bell Labs, Thompson and Dennis Ritchie worked on the Multics operating system.
He created the C programming language and, with long-time colleague Ken Thompson, the Unix operating system and B programming language.

QED (text editor)

QEDFRED (text editor)QED editor
Other notable contributions included his work on regular expressions and early computer text editors QED and ed, the definition of the UTF-8 encoding, his work on computer chess that included creation of endgame tablebases and the chess machine Belle. Thompson had developed the CTSS version of the editor QED, which included regular expressions for searching text.
Ken Thompson later wrote a version for CTSS; this version was notable for introducing regular expressions.

Space Travel (video game)

Space TravelSpace Travel'' (video game)
He also created a video game called Space Travel.
Space Travel is an early video game developed by Ken Thompson in 1969 that simulates travel in the Solar System.

University of California, Berkeley

UC BerkeleyUniversity of California at BerkeleyBerkeley
Thompson received a Bachelor of Science in 1965 and a Master's degree in 1966, both in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, from the University of California, Berkeley, where his master's thesis advisor was Elwyn Berlekamp.
Unix was created by alumnus Ken Thompson (BS 1965, MS 1966) along with colleague Dennis Ritchie.

Endgame tablebase

tablebasetablebasesendgame database
Other notable contributions included his work on regular expressions and early computer text editors QED and ed, the definition of the UTF-8 encoding, his work on computer chess that included creation of endgame tablebases and the chess machine Belle.
Ken Thompson and others helped extend tablebases to cover all four- and five-piece endgames, including in particular KBBKN, KQPKQ, and KRPKR.

Brian Kernighan

Brian W. KernighanKernighanB. Kernighan
In 1970, Brian Kernighan suggested the name "Unix", in a pun on the name "Multics".
He worked at Bell Labs and contributed to the development of Unix alongside Unix creators Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie.

Command-line interface

command linecommand-linecommand line interface
Eventually, the tools developed by Thompson became the Unix operating system: Working on a PDP-7, a team of Bell Labs researchers led by Thompson and Ritchie, and including Rudd Canaday, developed a hierarchical file system, the concepts of computer processes and device files, a command-line interpreter, pipes for easy inter-process communication, and some small utility programs.
The first Unix shell, the V6 shell, was developed by Ken Thompson in 1971 at Bell Labs and was modeled after Schroeder's Multics shell.

Operating system

operating systemsOScomputer operating system
Eventually, the tools developed by Thompson became the Unix operating system: Working on a PDP-7, a team of Bell Labs researchers led by Thompson and Ritchie, and including Rudd Canaday, developed a hierarchical file system, the concepts of computer processes and device files, a command-line interpreter, pipes for easy inter-process communication, and some small utility programs.
Ken Thompson wrote B, mainly based on BCPL, based on his experience in the MULTICS project.

Thompson's construction

Thompson's construction algorithm
He also invented Thompson's construction algorithm used for converting regular expression into nondeterministic finite automaton in order to make expression matching faster.
This algorithm is credited to Ken Thompson.

PDP-7

7
Eventually, the tools developed by Thompson became the Unix operating system: Working on a PDP-7, a team of Bell Labs researchers led by Thompson and Ritchie, and including Rudd Canaday, developed a hierarchical file system, the concepts of computer processes and device files, a command-line interpreter, pipes for easy inter-process communication, and some small utility programs. In order to go on playing the game, Thompson found an old PDP-7 machine and rewrote Space Travel on it.
In 1969, Ken Thompson wrote the first UNIX system in assembly language on a PDP-7, then named Unics as a pun on Multics, as the operating system for Space Travel, a game which requires graphics to depict the motion of the planets.

Multics

Multics operating systemMultics project
In the 1960s at Bell Labs, Thompson and Dennis Ritchie worked on the Multics operating system.
The design and features of Multics greatly influenced the Unix operating system, which was originally written by two Multics programmers, Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie.

Computer chess

chess computerChessCCRL
Later, along with Joseph Condon, Thompson created the hardware-assisted program Belle, a world champion chess computer.
At the 1982 North American Computer Chess Championship, Monroe Newborn predicted that a chess program could become world champion within five years; tournament director and International Master Michael Valvo predicted ten years; the Spracklens predicted 15; Ken Thompson predicted more than 20; and others predicted that it would never happen.

Berkeley Software Distribution

BSDBSD Unix*BSD
Unix at Berkeley would later become maintained as its own system, known as the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD).
In 1975, Ken Thompson took a sabbatical from Bell Labs and came to Berkeley as a visiting professor.

Pipeline (Unix)

pipespipepipeline
Eventually, the tools developed by Thompson became the Unix operating system: Working on a PDP-7, a team of Bell Labs researchers led by Thompson and Ritchie, and including Rudd Canaday, developed a hierarchical file system, the concepts of computer processes and device files, a command-line interpreter, pipes for easy inter-process communication, and some small utility programs.
His ideas were implemented in 1973 when ("in one feverish night", wrote McIlroy) Ken Thompson added the system call and pipes to the shell and several utilities in Version 3 Unix.

Compatible Time-Sharing System

CTSSCompatible Time Sharing System
Thompson had developed the CTSS version of the editor QED, which included regular expressions for searching text.

Linux

GNU/LinuxLinux on the desktopLin
According to a 2009 interview, Thompson now uses a Linux-based operating system.
The Unix operating system was conceived and implemented in 1969, at AT&T's Bell Laboratories in the United States by Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, Douglas McIlroy, and Joe Ossanna.

Joseph Henry Condon

Joe CondonJoseph Condon
Later, along with Joseph Condon, Thompson created the hardware-assisted program Belle, a world champion chess computer.
Condon and Ken Thompson promoted the use of the C programming language for AT&T's switching system control programs.