Kenji Doihara

Doihara KenjiKenji Doihara's criminal activitiesDoihara''' KenjiKenji DohiharaKenjii Doihara
Kenji Doihara was a Japanese army officer.wikipedia
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Yasuji Okamura

Okamura YasujiNeiji Okamura
The Eleven Reliable clique was an external tool of a more closed group of three influential senior military officers called the "Three Crows" (Tetsuzan Nagata, Yasuji Okamura and Toshishiro Obata) who wanted to modernize the Japanese military and to purge it of its anachronistic samurai tradition and the dominant allied clans of Chōshū and Satsuma that favored that tradition.
His classmates included the future generals Itagaki Seishiro, Kenji Doihara and Ando Rikichi.

Japanese invasion of Manchuria

invasion of Manchuriainvaded Manchuriainvaded
As a general in the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II, he was instrumental in the Japanese invasion of Manchuria for which he earned the nickname "Lawrence of Manchuria," a reference to Lawrence of Arabia. During the invasion, Doihara facilitated the tactical cooperation between the Northeastern Army Generals Xi Qia in Kirin, Zhang Jinghui in Harbin and Zhang Haipeng at Taonan in the northwest of Liaoning province.
As negotiations with Generals Ma Zanshan and Ting Chao to defect to the pro-Japanese side had failed, in early January Colonel Kenji Doihara requested collaborationist General Qia Xi to advance his forces and take Harbin.

Mukden Incident

Manchurian IncidentSeptember 18 IncidentMukden
While at Tientsin, Doihara, together with Itagaki Seishirō engineered the infamous Mukden Incident by ordering Lieutenant Suemori Komoto to place and fire a bomb near the tracks at the time when a Japanese train passed through.
Colonel Seishirō Itagaki, Lieutenant Colonel Kanji Ishiwara, Colonel Kenji Doihara, and Major Takayoshi Tanaka had completed plans for the incident by 31 May 1931.

Defense of Harbin

Harbin IncidentBattle of Harbincapture of Harbin
Doihara engineered a riot in Harbin to justify their intervention.
Colonel Kenji Doihara began negotiations with General Ma Zhanshan from his Special Service Office at Harbin, hoping to get him to defect to the new state of Manchukuo.

Puyi

Xuantong EmperorPu YiEmperor Puyi
Next, Doihara took the task to return former Qing dynasty Emperor Pu Yi to Manchuria as to give legitimacy to the puppet regime.
Another visitor to the Garden of Serenity was General Kenji Doihara, a Japanese Army officer who was fluent in Mandarin and a man of great charm who manipulated Puyi via flattery, telling him that a great man such as himself should go conquer Manchuria and then, just as his Qing ancestors did in the 17th century, use Manchuria as a base for conquering China.

War crimes in Manchukuo

Manchurian drug tradewar crime atrocities
He became the mastermind of the Manchurian drug trade and the real boss and sponsor behind every kind of gang and underworld activity in China.
Those sentenced to death with strong connections to Manchukuo included senior officers in the Kwantung Army Hideki Tōjō, Akira Mutō, Seishirō Itagaki and Kenji Doihara.

Xi Qia

Aisin-Gioro Xiqia
During the invasion, Doihara facilitated the tactical cooperation between the Northeastern Army Generals Xi Qia in Kirin, Zhang Jinghui in Harbin and Zhang Haipeng at Taonan in the northwest of Liaoning province.
When negotiations with Generals Ma Zhanshan and Ting Chao had come to naught, Japanese Colonel Kenji Doihara in early January 1932 requested that General Xi Qia advance with his forces to take Harbin from the last major Kuomintang force in the north led by General Ting Chao.

Manchukuo Imperial Army

Manchukuoarmed forcesarmy
Ma's fame as an uncompromised fighter against the Japanese invaders survived after his defeat and so Doihara made contact with him offering a huge sum of money and the command of the puppet state's army if he would defect to the new Manchurian government.
Ma initially accepted the offer from Colonel Kenji Doihara and briefly served as the state of Manchukuo's war minister.

Ma Zhanshan

Ma Chan-shan
In early 1932, Doihara was sent to head the Harbin Special Agency of the Kwantung Army, where he began negotiations with General Ma Zhanshan after he had been driven from Tsitsihar by the Japanese.
Because of his fame and heroics efforts in resisting the Japanese invasion of Manchuria, Colonel Kenji Doihara offered Ma Zhanshan a huge sum of $3,000,000 in gold to defect to the new Manchukuo Imperial Army.

Yoshiko Kawashima

Kawashima YoshikoEastern JewelJin Bihui
With the help of the legendary spy Kawashima Yoshiko, a woman well-acquainted with the Emperor, who regarded her as a member of the Chinese Imperial Family, he succeeded in bringing him into Manchuria within the deadline.
After Tanaka was recalled to Japan, Kawashima continued to serve as a spy for the general Kenji Doihara.

Three crows

The Eleven Reliable clique was an external tool of a more closed group of three influential senior military officers called the "Three Crows" (Tetsuzan Nagata, Yasuji Okamura and Toshishiro Obata) who wanted to modernize the Japanese military and to purge it of its anachronistic samurai tradition and the dominant allied clans of Chōshū and Satsuma that favored that tradition.
In the Kwantung Army of Imperial Japan for instance, the Three Crows refer to the Triumvirate of Army War College 24th class graduate Kenji Doihara, Army War College 28th class graduate Itagaki Seishiro and Army War College 30th class Military Sword Club member Kanji Ishiwara: the main masterminds of the Mukden Incident and the subsequent invasion of China.

Kwantung Army

Kwangtung ArmyGuandong ArmyKantōgun
The following year, he was transferred to Shenyang as head of the Houten Special Agency, the military intelligence service of the Japanese Kwantung Army.
Among those sentenced to death were former generals Seishirō Itagaki, Iwane Matsui, Kenji Doihara, Hideki Tōjō and Akira Mutō.

International Military Tribunal for the Far East

Tokyo tribunalTokyo War Crimes TribunalTokyo Trials
After the end of World War II, he was prosecuted for war crimes in the International Military Tribunal for the Far East.

Golden Bat (cigarette)

Golden Bat
Winning the necessary support from the authorities in Tokyo he persuaded the Japanese tobacco industry Mitsui of Mitsui Zaibatsu to produce special cigarettes bearing the popular to the Far East trademark "Golden Bat".
Local Japanese secret service under the controversial General Kenji Doihara had the control of their distribution in China and Manchuria where the production exported.

Eastern District Army (Japan)

Eastern District ArmyEasternEastern Army
In 1943, Doihara was made Commander in Chief of the Eastern District Army.

Mitsui

Mitsui GroupMitsui zaibatsuMitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding
Winning the necessary support from the authorities in Tokyo he persuaded the Japanese tobacco industry Mitsui of Mitsui Zaibatsu to produce special cigarettes bearing the popular to the Far East trademark "Golden Bat".
Local Japanese secret service under the controversial Imperial Japanese Army General Kenji Doihara had the control of their distribution in China and Manchuria where the production exported.

Japanese Seventh Area Army

7th Area ArmySeventh Area ArmyJapanese forces in Malaya
In 1944, he was appointed the Governor of Johor State, Malaya, and commander in chief of the Japanese Seventh Area Army in Singapore until 1945.

Surrender of Japan

Japanese surrenderJapan's surrenderJapan surrendered
At the time of the surrender of Japan in 1945, Doihara was commander in chief of the 1st General Army.
It was signed by all the high-ranking officers present, including Anami, Hajime Sugiyama, Yoshijirō Umezu, Kenji Doihara, Torashirō Kawabe, Masakazu Kawabe, and Tadaichi Wakamatsu.

Hanging

hangedhangdeath by hanging
He was hanged on 23 December 1948 at Sugamo Prison.
On 23 December 1948, Hideki Tojo, Kenji Doihara, Akira Mutō, Iwane Matsui, Seishirō Itagaki, Kōki Hirota, and Heitaro Kimura were hanged at Sugamo Prison by the U.S. occupation authorities in Ikebukuro in Allied-occupied Japan for war crimes, crimes against humanity, and crimes against peace during the Asia-Pacific theatre of World War II.

First General Army (Japan)

First General ArmyJapanese First General Army1st General Army
At the time of the surrender of Japan in 1945, Doihara was commander in chief of the 1st General Army.

14th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

14th DivisionIJA 14th Division14th Infantry Division
From 1936 to 1937, Doihara was the commander of the 1st Depot Division in Japan until the Marco Polo Bridge Incident, when he was given command of the IJA 14th Division under the Japanese First Army in North China.
The outbreak of general hostilities in the Second Sino-Japanese War in 1937 put the 14th Division under the command of Lieutenant General Kenji Doihara was reassigned to the Northern China Area Army theater of operations and as part of the IJA 1st Army participated in the Beiping–Hankou Railway Operation, proceeding by Baoding - Shanxi - Xuzhou route.

Japanese Twelfth Area Army

12th area armyJapanese 12th Area ArmyTwelfth Area Army
Returning to Japan in 1945, Doihara was promoted to Inspector-General of Military Training (one of the most prestigious positions in the Army) and commander in chief of the Japanese Twelfth Area Army.

Fifth Army (Japan)

5th ArmyFifth ArmyJapanese Fifth Army
After the Battle of Lanfeng, Doihara was attached to the Army General Staff as head of the Doihara Special Agency until 1939, when he was given command of the Japanese Fifth Army, in Manchukuo under the overall control of the Kwantung Army.

Inspectorate General of Military Training

Inspector-General of Military TrainingInspector General of Military TrainingDeputy Inspector-General of Military Training
Returning to Japan in 1945, Doihara was promoted to Inspector-General of Military Training (one of the most prestigious positions in the Army) and commander in chief of the Japanese Twelfth Area Army.

Naoki Hoshino

Hoshino Naoki
He was found guilty on counts 1, 27, 29, 31, 32, 35, 36, and 54 and was sentenced to death, while his close colleague Naoki Hoshino, financial expert and director of the Japanese State Opium Monopoly Bureau in Manchuria, was sentenced to life imprisonment.
He was found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment at Sugamo Prison in Tokyo while his close colleague general Kenji Doihara responsible for the smuggling of narcotics in the occupied and non-occupied areas was sentenced to death and hanged.