A report on Kentucky

Abraham Lincoln Birthplace near Hodgenville
A map of Kentucky
Kentucky's regions (click on image for color-coding information)
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Lake Cumberland is the largest artificial American lake east of the Mississippi River by volume.
Once an industrial wasteland, Louisville's reclaimed waterfront now features thousands of trees and miles of walking trails.
Red River Gorge is one of Kentucky's most visited places.
Forest at Otter Creek Outdoor Recreation Area, Meade County, Kentucky
Kentucky Population Density Map
Lexington Theological Seminary (then College of the Bible), 1904
The best selling car in the United States, the Toyota Camry, is manufactured in Georgetown, Kentucky.
The best selling truck in the United States, the Ford F-Series, is manufactured in Louisville, Kentucky.
The Ark Encounter in Williamstown, KY
Spring running of Keeneland in Lexington, KY
William T. Young Library at the University of Kentucky, Kentucky's flagship university.
The J.B. Speed School of Engineering at the University of Louisville, Kentucky's urban research university.
At 484 mi long, Kentucky Route 80 is the longest route in Kentucky, pictured here west of Somerset.
High Bridge over the Kentucky River was the tallest rail bridge in the world when it was completed in 1877.
A barge hauling coal in the Louisville and Portland Canal, the only manmade section of the Ohio River
The governor's mansion in Frankfort
The Kentucky State Capitol building in Frankfort
A map showing Kentucky's six congressional districts
State sign, Interstate 65
Treemap of the popular vote by county, 2016 presidential election
The Buffalo Trace Distillery
Old Louisville is the largest Victorian Historic neighborhood in the United States.
The U.S. 23 Country Music Highway Museum in Paintsville provides background on the country music artists from Eastern Kentucky.
The Hot Brown
Kentucky's Churchill Downs hosts the Kentucky Derby.

State in the Southeastern region of the United States and one of the states of the Upper South.

- Kentucky

293 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Louisville, Kentucky

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Louisville's founder, George Rogers Clark
View of 2nd Street and Main Street, Louisville, in 1846
Churchill Downs in 1901
Entrance to Fourth Street Live!, featuring marquee of the Hard Rock Cafe
Hilly terrain blankets the southwest part of the city.
Highlands district, specifically the Bonnycastle neighborhood
Werne's Row in Old Louisville
Broadway and 3rd Street downtown
Map of racial distribution in Louisville, 2010 U.S. Census. Each dot is 25 people:
Cathedral of the Assumption
L&N Building on West Broadway
19th-century bourbon bottle. One-third of all bourbon comes from Louisville.
Left to right, BB&T Building, 400 West Market, National City Tower, and the Humana Building in downtown Louisville
2018 Kentucky Derby Festival Thunder Over Louisville fireworks display, seen from the Indiana side of the Ohio River
A giant baseball bat adorns the Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory.
Facade of the Frazier History Museum
Muhammad Ali Center, alongside I64 on Louisville's riverfront
The Belle of Louisville
The Kentucky Center in Downtown Louisville
Louisville Slugger Field, where the Louisville Bats play
The Kentucky Derby in progress at Churchill Downs
David Armstrong Extreme Park
Louisville Waterfront Park exhibits rolling hills, spacious lawns and walking paths in the downtown area.
A section of the Louisville Loop bike and pedestrian trail
Louisville City Hall in downtown, built 1870–1873, is a blend of Italianate styles characteristic of Neo-Renaissance.
Metro Police cruiser
Louisville Metro EMS ambulance
Grawemeyer Hall, modeled after the Roman Pantheon, is the University of Louisville's main administrative building.
Medical Office Plaza on the University of Louisville's downtown Health Sciences Campus
Kennedy Interchange ("Spaghetti Junction"), prior to the Ohio River Bridges Project
Louisville International Airport
Toonerville II Trolleys provided transportation in downtown Louisville until late 2014, before being replaced by LouLift.
Completed in 1860, the Louisville Water Tower is the oldest water tower in the U.S.
Distances to each of Louisville's sister cities on the downtown light post

Louisville is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the 28th most-populous city in the United States.

Tennessee

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State in the Southeastern region of the United States.

State in the Southeastern region of the United States.

Detail of Tanasi (spelled "Tennessee") on Henry Timberlake's [[:File:Draught of the Cherokee Country.jpg|Draught of the Cherokee Country]]
Reconstruction of Fort Loudoun, the first British settlement in Tennessee
The Southwest Territory in 1790
Surveyor Daniel Smith's "Map of the Tennassee State" (1796)
The Hermitage, plantation home of President Andrew Jackson in Nashville
The Battle of Franklin, November 30, 1864
Memphis became known as the "Cotton Capital of the World" in the years following the Civil War
Workers at the Norris Dam construction camp site in 1933
Calutron operators at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge during the Manhattan Project
The 1982 World's Fair in Knoxville
The Ocoee River was home to the 1996 Summer Olympics whitewater slalom events, the only Olympic sporting event ever held in the state.
Mount Le Conte in the Great Smoky Mountains is the tallest mountain in eastern North America, measured from base to summit
Fall Creek Falls, the tallest waterfall in the eastern United States, is located on the Cumberland Plateau
Reelfoot Lake in West Tennessee was formed by the 1811–1812 New Madrid earthquakes
Cedar glades are an extremely rare ecosystem that is found in regions of Middle Tennessee where limestone bedrock is close to the surface
Köppen climate types of Tennessee, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
A geomap showing the counties of Tennessee colored by the relative range of that county's median income.
Chart showing poverty in Tennessee, by age and gender (red = female)
A Nissan Leaf, one of six models manufactured at the Nissan Smyrna Assembly Plant, the largest automotive assembly plant in North America
Established in 1942, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is the largest national laboratory in the Department of Energy system
Norris Dam, a hydroelectric dam operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority.
The resort city of Gatlinburg borders the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which is the most visited national park in the United States.
The Grand Ole Opry, which was recorded in Nashville's Ryman Auditorium from 1943 to 1974, is the longest-running radio broadcast in US history.
Vanderbilt University in Nashville is consistently ranked as one of the top research institutions in the nation
Offices of The Tennessean in Nashville
Interstate 40 traverses Tennessee from east to west, and serves the state's three largest cities.
Memphis International Airport, the hub of FedEx Corporation, is the busiest cargo airport in the world
Tennessee State Capitol in Nashville
Al Gore served as a United States Senator from Tennessee (1985-1993) and as Vice President of the United States (1993-2001)
Howard Baker served as Senate Minority and Majority Leader from 1977 to 1985, and was known as "The Great Conciliator"
Tennessee Volunteers football

It is bordered by Kentucky to the north, Virginia to the northeast, North Carolina to the east, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi to the south, Arkansas to the southwest, and Missouri to the northwest.

Ohio River

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981 mi long river in the United States.

981 mi long river in the United States.

Steamboat Morning Star, a Louisville and Evansville mail packet, in 1858.
Built between 1847 and 1849, the Wheeling Suspension Bridge was the first bridge across the river and a crucial part of the National Road.
Cave-in-rock, view on the Ohio (circa 1832, Cave-In-Rock, Illinois): aquatint by Karl Bodmer from the book Maximilian, Prince of Wied's Travels in the Interior of North America, during the years 1832–1834
Silver Bridge in Point Pleasant, West Virginia which collapsed into the Ohio River on December 15, 1967, killing 46 people.
A barge heads east on the Ohio River in Louisville, Kentucky.
The confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio rivers is at Cairo, Illinois.
The Ohio River as seen from Fredonia, Indiana.
Natural-color satellite image of the Wabash-Ohio confluence.
Lawrenceburg, Indiana, is one of many towns that use the Ohio as a shipping avenue.
Glacial Lake Ohio
The Allegheny River, left, and Monongahela River join to form the Ohio River at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the largest metropolitan area on the river.
Louisville, Kentucky, The deepest point of the Ohio River is a scour hole just below Cannelton locks and dam (river mile 720.7).
A barge hauls coal in the Louisville and Portland Canal, the only artificial portion of the Ohio River.
Cincinnati skyline showing the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge to Covington, Kentucky.
Carl Perkins Bridge in Portsmouth, Ohio with Ohio River and Scioto River tributary on right.
The Ohio River seen at Sciotoville, from the "Geography of Ohio," 1923

In his original draft of the Land Ordinance of 1784, Thomas Jefferson proposed a new state called "Pelisipia", to the south of the Ohio River, which would have included parts of present-day Eastern Kentucky, Virginia and West Virginia.

West Virginia

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State in the Appalachian, Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern regions of the United States.

State in the Appalachian, Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern regions of the United States.

Thomas Lee, the first manager of the Ohio Company of Virginia
A slave wedding in Virginia, 1838
Map of Virginia dated June 13, 1861, featuring the percentage of slave population within each county at the 1860 census and the proposed state of Kanawha
Francis H. Pierpont, a leader during the Second Wheeling Convention.
Abraham Lincoln Walks at Midnight, a statue on the grounds of the West Virginia State Capitol
Harpers Ferry alternated between Confederate and Union rule eight times during the American Civil War, and was finally annexed by West Virginia.
Votes by county in the October 1861 statehood vote
Child labor in the coal mines of West Virginia, 1908.
Family of a coal miner, circa 1935
Saturday afternoon street scene, Welch, McDowell County, 1946
Map of West Virginia counties
Shaded relief map of the Cumberland Plateau and Ridge-and-valley Appalachians
The summit of Spruce Knob is often covered in clouds.
Köppen climate types of West Virginia, using 1991-2020 climate normals
West Virginia population density map
Seneca Rocks, Pendleton County
Bituminous coal seam in southwestern West Virginia
Bluefield, a major center for coal mining, in 2014
The West Virginia State Capitol in Charleston is home to the West Virginia Legislature.
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A toll plaza on the West Virginia Turnpike
The iconic New River Gorge Bridge near Fayetteville
The Veterans Memorial Bridge carries US 22 from Steubenville into Ohio.

It is bordered by Pennsylvania to the north and east, Maryland to the east and northeast, Virginia to the southeast, Kentucky to the southwest, and Ohio to the northwest.

Virginia

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State in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern regions of the United States, between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains.

State in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern regions of the United States, between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains.

The story of Pocahontas was romanticized by later artists, in part because of her association with the First Families of Virginia.
Williamsburg was Virginia's capital from 1699 to 1780.
1851 painting of Patrick Henry's speech before the House of Burgesses on the Virginia Resolves against the Stamp Act of 1765
Richmond was the capital of the Confederacy from 1861 to 1865, when it was partially burned by them prior to its recapture by Union forces.
Many World War I-era warships were built in Newport News, including the USS Virginia.
Protests in 2020 were focused on the Confederate monuments in the state.
Virginia is shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains, the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed, and the parallel 36°30′ north.
Great Falls is on the fall line of the Potomac River, and its rocks date to the late Precambrian.
Oak trees in particular produce a haze of isoprene, which helps gives the Blue Ridge Mountains their signature color.
White-tailed deer are also known as Virginia deer, and up to seven thousand live in Shenandoah National Park.
Population density of Virginia counties and cities in 2020
New citizens attend a naturalization ceremony in Northern Virginia, where 25% of residents are foreign-born, almost twice the overall state average
Since 1927, Arlington National Cemetery has hosted an annual nondenominational sunrise service every Easter.
Virginia counties and cities by median household income (2010)
The Department of Defense is headquartered in Arlington at the Pentagon, the world's largest office building.
Ocean tourism is an important sector of Virginia Beach's economy.
Rockingham County accounts for twenty percent of Virginia's agricultural sales.
Colonial Virginian culture, language, and style are reenacted in Williamsburg.
Americana Roots Folk Rock band The Steel Wheels play at the Jefferson Theater in Charlottesville
The annual Pony Penning features more than two hundred wild ponies swimming across the Assateague Channel into Chincoteague.
USA Today, the nation's most circulated newspaper, has its headquarters in McLean.
Virginia's public schools serve over a million students at over 2,200 schools.
The University of Virginia, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, guarantees full tuition scholarships to all in-state students from families earning up to $80,000.
Patients are screened for COVID-19 outside Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, the Navy's oldest continuously operating hospital.
The Silver Line extension of the Washington Metro system opened in Tysons Corner in 2014.
The Virginia State Capitol, designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clérisseau, is home to the Virginia General Assembly.
Unlike the federal system, justices of the Virginia Supreme Court have term limits and a mandatory retirement age, and select their own Chief Justice.
Mirroring Virginia's political transition, the annual Shad Planking event in Wakefield has evolved from a vestige of the Byrd era into a regular stop for many state campaigns.
Republicans gained seven seats (red) in the 2021 General Assembly elections.
Mark Warner and Tim Kaine, Virginia's two U.S. Senators, are both former governors.
The annual Monument Avenue 10K in Richmond has become one of the ten largest timed races in the U.S.
Mike Scott and Joe Harris of the Virginia Cavaliers battle Cadarian Raines of the Virginia Tech Hokies for a rebound at Cassell Coliseum
The state slogan, "Virginia is for Lovers", has been used since 1969 and is featured on the state's welcome signs.

Virginia is called the "Mother of States" because of its role in being carved into states such as Kentucky, which became the fifteenth state in 1792, and for the numbers of American pioneers born in Virginia.

Ohio

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State in the Midwestern region of the United States.

State in the Midwestern region of the United States.

Artists conception of the Fort Ancient SunWatch Indian Village in Dayton.
Iroquois conquests during the Beaver Wars (mid-1600s), which largely depopulated the upper and mid-Ohio River valley.
The Ohio Country indicating battle sites between American settlers and indigenous tribes, 1775–1794.
Rufus Putnam by James Sharples, Jr., 1797
Battle of Lake Erie by William Henry Powell.
The route of Morgan's Raid.
The first Standard Oil refinery was opened in Cleveland by businessman John D. Rockefeller.
Iron being converted to steel for wartime efforts at Youngstown's Republic Steel in 1941.
Geographic regions of Ohio.
Map of Ohio cities and rivers.
Köppen climate types of Ohio, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Ohio population density map.
Amish children on their way to school
Cincinnati's Procter & Gamble is one of Ohio's largest companies in terms of revenue.
Cincinnati light rail
The Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, home to the Ohio General Assembly.
The Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center holds the Supreme Court of Ohio.
Presidential election results by county for 2020
University Hall at the Ohio State University in Columbus.
Bosworth Hall at Oberlin College in northeast Ohio.
Springer Auditorium at the Cincinnati Music Hall.
Progressive Field, home to the Cleveland Guardians baseball team
Ohio Stadium in Columbus, home to the Ohio State Buckeyes football team, is the fifth largest stadium in the world.
Population growth by county in Ohio between the 2010 and 2020 censuses. -10 to -5 percent
-5 to -2 percent
-2 to 0 percent
0 to 2 percent
2 to 5 percent
5 to 10 percent
10 to 20 percent
More than 20 percent

Ohio is bordered by Lake Erie to the north, Pennsylvania to the east, West Virginia to the southeast, Kentucky to the southwest, Indiana to the west, and Michigan to the northwest.

Appalachia

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Cultural region in the Eastern United States that stretches from the Southern Tier of New York State to northern Alabama and Georgia.

Cultural region in the Eastern United States that stretches from the Southern Tier of New York State to northern Alabama and Georgia.

William G. Frost, an American Greek scholar who was credited with coining the phrase "Appalachian American."
Detail of Gutierrez' 1562 map showing the first known cartographic appearance of a variant of the name "Appalachia"
Daniel Boone Escorting Settlers through the Cumberland Gap (George Caleb Bingham, oil on canvas, 1851–52)
The Earnest Fort-house in Greene County, Tennessee. Built around 1782 during the Cherokee–American wars, it is located just south of Chuckey on the banks of the Nolichucky River.
Map of the county secession votes of 1860–1861 in Appalachia within the ARC definition. Virginia and Tennessee show the public votes, while the other states show the vote by county delegates to the conventions.
Entrance to mine shaft in West Virginia, photographed by Lewis Hine in 1908
Asheville, NC at dusk
Knoxville, Tennessee skyline
Baptism in Morehead, Kentucky, photographed by Marion Post Wolcott in 1940
Students walking through Sanford Mall at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina
Tyler Childers, labeled by Rolling Stone as the "21st-Century Voice of Appalachia," addresses systemic issues facing Appalachian people in his music.
Former site of Proctor, North Carolina, setting of Kephart's book, ''Our Southern Highlanders
Statue of legendary railroad worker John Henry in Talcott, West Virginia
A highland pasture near Maggie Valley, North Carolina
Sawmill and millpond in Erwin, West Virginia, photographed by Marion Post Wolcott in 1938
Coal company houses in Jenkins, Kentucky, photographed by Ben Shahn in 1935
Storage tanks at the Institute plant along the Kanawha River in West Virginia, photographed late 1930s/early 1940s
The Homestead, a resort hotel in Bath County, Virginia, photographed in 1903
A 1930s-era TVA photograph showing a young girl in front of her family's house in the lower Clinch River valley in East Tennessee
Map showing the 80 counties included in the 1982 report by the Appalachian Land Ownership Task Force
The New River Gorge Bridge in West Virginia is the longest steel span in the western hemisphere and at 876 ft, the third highest in the United States.
"The Moonshine Man of Kentucky", an 1877 illustration from Harper's Weekly

The region defined by the Commission currently includes 420 counties and eight independent cities in 13 states, including all of West Virginia, 14 counties in New York, 52 in Pennsylvania, 32 in Ohio, 3 in Maryland, 54 in Kentucky, 25 counties and 8 cities in Virginia, 29 in North Carolina, 52 in Tennessee, 6 in South Carolina, 37 in Georgia, 37 in Alabama, and 24 in Mississippi.

Clockwise from top: Battle of Gettysburg

Union Captain John Tidball's artillery

Confederate prisoners

ironclad USS Atlanta (1861)

Ruins of Richmond, Virginia

Battle of Franklin

American Civil War

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Civil war in the United States between the Union (states that remained loyal to the federal union, or "the North") and the Confederacy (states that voted to secede, or "the South").

Civil war in the United States between the Union (states that remained loyal to the federal union, or "the North") and the Confederacy (states that voted to secede, or "the South").

Clockwise from top: Battle of Gettysburg

Union Captain John Tidball's artillery

Confederate prisoners

ironclad USS Atlanta (1861)

Ruins of Richmond, Virginia

Battle of Franklin
Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe, aroused public opinion about the evils of slavery. According to legend, when Lincoln was introduced to her at the White House, his first words were, "So this is the little lady who started this Great War."
Frederick Douglass, a former slave, was a leading abolitionist
Marais des Cygnes massacre of anti-slavery Kansans, May 19, 1858
Mathew Brady, Portrait of Abraham Lincoln, 1860
The first published imprint of secession, a broadside issued by the Charleston Mercury, December 20, 1860
Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America (1861–1865)
Bombardment of the Fort by the Confederates
Rioters attacking a building during the New York anti-draft riots of 1863
Clashes on the rivers were melees of ironclads, cottonclads, gunboats and rams, complicated by naval mines and fire rafts.
Battle between the USS Monitor and USS Merrimack (1855)
General Scott's "Anaconda Plan" 1861. Tightening naval blockade, forcing rebels out of Missouri along the Mississippi River, Kentucky Unionists sit on the fence, idled cotton industry illustrated in Georgia.
Gunline of nine Union ironclads. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron off Charleston. Continuous blockade of all major ports was sustained by North's overwhelming war production.
A December 1861 cartoon in Punch magazine in London ridicules American aggressiveness in the Trent Affair. John Bull, at right, warns Uncle Sam, "You do what's right, my son, or I'll blow you out of the water."
County map of Civil War battles by theater and year
Robert E. Lee
"Stonewall" Jackson got his nickname at Bull Run.
George B. McClellan
The Battle of Antietam, the Civil War's deadliest one-day fight.
Confederate dead overrun at Marye's Heights, reoccupied next day May 4, 1863
Pickett's Charge
Ulysses S. Grant
Albert Sidney Johnston died at Shiloh
By 1863, the Union controlled large portions of the Western Theater, especially areas surrounding the Mississippi River
The Battle of Chickamauga, the highest two-day losses
Nathaniel Lyon secured St. Louis docks and arsenal, led Union forces to expel Missouri Confederate forces and government.
New Orleans captured
William Tecumseh Sherman
These dead soldiers—from Ewell's May 1864 attack at Spotsylvania—delayed Grant's advance on Richmond in the Overland Campaign.
Philip Sheridan
Map of Confederate territory losses year by year
Burying Union dead on the Antietam battlefield, 1862
Through the supervision of the Freedmen's Bureau, northern teachers traveled into the South to provide education and training for the newly freed population.
Beginning in 1961 the U.S. Post Office released commemorative stamps for five famous battles, each issued on the 100th anniversary of the respective battle.
The Battle of Fort Sumter, as depicted by Currier and Ives.
Slave states that seceded before April 15, 1861 Slave states that seceded after April 15, 1861 Union states that permitted slavery (border states) Union states that banned slavery
Territories
US Secession map. The Union vs. the Confederacy.
Union states
Union territories not permitting slavery
Border Union states, permitting slavery (One of these states, West Virginia was created in 1863)
Confederate states
Union territories that permitted slavery (claimed by Confederacy) at the start of the war, but where slavery was outlawed by the U.S. in 1862
The Battle of Antietam, the Civil War's deadliest one-day fight.
Abolition of slavery in the various states of the United States over time:Abolition of slavery during or shortly after the American Revolution
The Northwest Ordinance, 1787
Gradual emancipation in New York (starting 1799, completed 1827) and New Jersey (starting 1804, completed by Thirteenth Amendment, 1865)
The Missouri Compromise, 1821
Effective abolition of slavery by Mexican or joint US/British authority
Abolition of slavery by Congressional action, 1861
Abolition of slavery by Congressional action, 1862
Emancipation Proclamation as originally issued, January 1, 1863
Subsequent operation of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863
Abolition of slavery by state action during the Civil War
Operation of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1864
Operation of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1865
Thirteenth Amendment to the US constitution, December 18, 1865
Territory incorporated into the US after the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment
Oath to defend the Constitution of the United States and, among other promises, to "abide by and faithfully support all acts of Congress passed during the . . . rebellion having reference to slaves . . . ," signed by former Confederate officer Samuel M. Kennard on June 27, 1865

Maryland, Delaware, Missouri, and Kentucky were slave states that had divided loyalties to Northern and Southern businesses and family members.

Confederate States of America

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Unrecognized breakaway republic in North America that existed from February 8, 1861, to May 9, 1865.

Unrecognized breakaway republic in North America that existed from February 8, 1861, to May 9, 1865.

style=padding-left: 0.6em; text-align: left;
Map of the division of the states in the American Civil War (1861–1865). Blue indicates the northern Union states; light blue represents five Union slave states (border states) that primarily stayed in Union control. Red represents southern seceded states in rebellion, also known as the Confederate States of America. Uncolored areas were U.S. territories, with the exception of the Indian Territory (later Oklahoma).
Evolution of the Confederate States, December 20, 1860 – July 15, 1870
Alexander H. Stephens, Confederate Vice President; author of the 'Cornerstone Speech'
The inauguration of Jefferson Davis in Montgomery, Alabama
Elias Boudinot, Cherokee secessionist, Rep. Indian Territory
William T. Sutherlin mansion, Danville, Virginia, temporary residence of Jefferson Davis and dubbed "Last Capitol of the Confederacy"
Map of the county secession votes of 1860–1861 in Appalachia within the ARC definition. Virginia and Tennessee show the public votes, while the other states show the vote by county delegates to the conventions.
The Seal, symbols of an independent agricultural Confederacy surrounding an equestrian Washington, sword encased
Recruitment poster: "Do not wait to be drafted". Under half re-enlisted.
Unionists throughout the Confederate States resisted the 1862 conscription
Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy from 1861 to 1865
Davis's cabinet in 1861, Montgomery, Alabama
Front row, left to right: Judah P. Benjamin, Stephen Mallory, Alexander H. Stephens, Jefferson Davis, John Henninger Reagan, and Robert Toombs
Back row, standing left to right: Christopher Memminger and LeRoy Pope Walker
Illustration printed in Harper's Weekly
Provisional Congress, Montgomery, Alabama
surviving Confederate mail
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Main railroads of Confederacy, 1861; colors show the different gauges (track width); the top railroad shown in the upper right is the Baltimore and Ohio, which was at all times a Union railroad
Passers-by abusing the bodies of Union supporters near Knoxville, Tennessee. The two were hanged by Confederate authorities near the railroad tracks so passing train passengers could see them.
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Richmond bread riot, 1863
Confederate memorial tombstone at Natchez City Cemetery in Natchez, Mississippi
This Confederate Flag pattern is the one most often thought of as the Confederate Flag today; it was one of many used by the Confederate armed forces. Variations of this design served as the Battle Flag of the Armies of Northern Virginia and Tennessee, and as the Confederate Naval Jack.
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A Home on the Mississippi, Currier and Ives, 1871
St. John's Episcopal Church, Montgomery. The Secession Convention of Southern Churches was held here in 1861.
Major-General John C. Breckinridge, Secretary of War (1865)
General Robert E. Lee, General in Chief (1865)
William L. Yancey, {{small|Alabama Fire-Eater, "The Orator of Secession"}}
William Henry Gist, {{small|Governor of South Carolina, called the Secessionist Convention}}
CSA Naval Jack
{{small|Battle Flag – square}}
Gen. Gabriel J. Rains, {{small|Conscription Bureau chief, April 1862 – May 1863}}
Gen. Gideon J. Pillow, {{small|military recruiter under Bragg, then J.E. Johnston<ref>Coulter, The Confederates States of America, p. 324.</ref>}}
Joseph E. Brown, governor of Georgia
Pendleton Murrah, governor of Texas
Jesse J. Finley
Henry R. Jackson
Asa Biggs
Andrew Magrath
John H. Reagan
Jefferson Davis, 5 cent
Andrew Jackson
George Washington
Potters House, Atlanta Ga
Downtown Charleston SC
Navy Yard, Norfolk Va
Rail bridge, Petersburg Va
1st National Flag
2nd National Flag
3rd National Flag
Battle Flag

Kentucky and Missouri also had declarations of secession and full representation in the Confederate Congress during their Union army occupation.

Lexington, Kentucky

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Historic Henry Clay law office in downtown Lexington
Lexington's strict urban growth boundary protects area horse farms from development.
Cheapside Ave in downtown
Map of racial distribution in Lexington, 2010 U.S. Census. Each dot is 25 people:
The Jif peanut butter plant on Winchester Road
The Lexington History Center
Rupp Arena
Downtown Arts Center
The Mary Todd Lincoln House, completed in 1832
Hunt-Morgan House, completed in 1814, served as residence for John Wesley Hunt, the first millionaire west of the Appalachians; a Confederate General (John Hunt Morgan); and one of Kentucky's Nobel Prize winners (Thomas Hunt Morgan).
Kroger Field (formerly Commonwealth Stadium)
A Lexington Legends game
The Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event
Lexington Cemetery's tulip garden. The facility was founded in 1848, during a cholera epidemic.
Overlooking the Kentucky River at Raven Run
Robert F. Stephens Courthouse
The Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Building
Memorial Hall is the most frequently photographed building at the University of Kentucky.
North Broadway near Transylvania University's campus

Lexington is the second-largest city in Kentucky and the county seat of Fayette County.