Kentucky

Abraham Lincoln Birthplace near Hodgenville
A map of Kentucky
Kentucky's regions (click on image for color-coding information)
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Lake Cumberland is the largest artificial American lake east of the Mississippi River by volume.
Once an industrial wasteland, Louisville's reclaimed waterfront now features thousands of trees and miles of walking trails.
Red River Gorge is one of Kentucky's most visited places.
Forest at Otter Creek Outdoor Recreation Area, Meade County, Kentucky
Kentucky Population Density Map
Lexington Theological Seminary (then College of the Bible), 1904
The best selling car in the United States, the Toyota Camry, is manufactured in Georgetown, Kentucky.
The best selling truck in the United States, the Ford F-Series, is manufactured in Louisville, Kentucky.
The Ark Encounter in Williamstown, KY
Spring running of Keeneland in Lexington, KY
William T. Young Library at the University of Kentucky, Kentucky's flagship university.
The J.B. Speed School of Engineering at the University of Louisville, Kentucky's urban research university.
At 484 mi long, Kentucky Route 80 is the longest route in Kentucky, pictured here west of Somerset.
High Bridge over the Kentucky River was the tallest rail bridge in the world when it was completed in 1877.
A barge hauling coal in the Louisville and Portland Canal, the only manmade section of the Ohio River
The governor's mansion in Frankfort
The Kentucky State Capitol building in Frankfort
A map showing Kentucky's six congressional districts
State sign, Interstate 65
Treemap of the popular vote by county, 2016 presidential election
The Buffalo Trace Distillery
Old Louisville is the largest Victorian Historic neighborhood in the United States.
The U.S. 23 Country Music Highway Museum in Paintsville provides background on the country music artists from Eastern Kentucky.
The Hot Brown
Kentucky's Churchill Downs hosts the Kentucky Derby.

State in the Southeastern region of the United States and one of the states of the Upper South, bordered by Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio to the north; West Virginia and Virginia to the east; Tennessee to the south; and Missouri to the west.

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Ohio

State in the Midwestern region of the United States.

Artists conception of the Fort Ancient SunWatch Indian Village in Dayton.
Iroquois conquests during the Beaver Wars (mid-1600s), which largely depopulated the upper and mid-Ohio River valley.
The Ohio Country indicating battle sites between American settlers and indigenous tribes, 1775–1794.
Rufus Putnam by James Sharples, Jr., 1797
Battle of Lake Erie by William Henry Powell.
The route of Morgan's Raid.
The first Standard Oil refinery was opened in Cleveland by businessman John D. Rockefeller.
Iron being converted to steel for wartime efforts at Youngstown's Republic Steel in 1941.
Geographic regions of Ohio.
Map of Ohio cities and rivers.
Köppen climate types of Ohio, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Ohio population density map.
Amish children on their way to school
Cincinnati's Procter & Gamble is one of Ohio's largest companies in terms of revenue.
Cincinnati light rail
The Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, home to the Ohio General Assembly.
The Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center holds the Supreme Court of Ohio.
Presidential election results by county for 2020
University Hall at the Ohio State University in Columbus.
Bosworth Hall at Oberlin College in northeast Ohio.
Springer Auditorium at the Cincinnati Music Hall.
Progressive Field, home to the Cleveland Guardians baseball team
Ohio Stadium in Columbus, home to the Ohio State Buckeyes football team, is the fifth largest stadium in the world.

Ohio is bordered by Lake Erie to the north, Pennsylvania to the east, West Virginia to the southeast, Kentucky to the southwest, Indiana to the west, and Michigan to the northwest.

Mammoth Cave National Park

The Bottomless Pit in Mammoth Cave, woodcut (1887)
A ranger-guided tour of the cave
The World Heritage Site plaque
The historic entrance at 37.18722°N, -86.10361°W
Map of Mammoth Cave (1897)
The Mammoth Cave of Kentucky: An illustrated manual (1897)
Historic signatures on the ceiling of Gothic Avenue
Stalactites, and stalagmites formed from travertine inside Mammoth Cave
River Styx cave boat tour
Staircase tower in Mammoth Dome
River Styx, one of the cave's semi-subterranean waterways, emerges onto the surface in the park.
Mammoth cave system and surface

Mammoth Cave National Park is an American national park in west-central Kentucky, encompassing portions of Mammoth Cave, the longest cave system known in the world.

Bourbon whiskey

Type of American whiskey, a barrel-aged distilled liquor made primarily from corn.

A selection of bourbons and Tennessee whiskeys at a liquor store.
Nineteenth century bourbon bottle
American white oak barrels filled with new bourbon whiskey rest in a rickhouse, giving bourbon its well-known copper color.
The bourbon distilleries that produce Buffalo Trace (left), Maker's Mark (center), and Woodford Reserve (right), are National Historic Landmarks in Kentucky.
Used bourbon barrels awaiting fresh contents in Scotland
A mint julep

The name derives from the French Bourbon dynasty, although the precise inspiration is uncertain; contenders include Bourbon County in Kentucky and Bourbon Street in New Orleans, both of which are named after the dynasty.

Illinois

State in the Midwestern United States.

Mississippian copper plate found at the Saddle Site in Union County, Illinois
Illinois in 1718, approximate modern state area highlighted, from Carte de la Louisiane et du cours du Mississipi by Guillaume de L'Isle
The bell donated by King Louis XV in 1741 to the mission at Kaskaskia. It was later called the "Liberty Bell of the West", after it was rung to celebrate U.S. victory in the Revolution
In 1818, Illinois became the 21st U.S. state. The southern portion of Illinois Territory was admitted as the state of Illinois, and the rest was joined to Michigan Territory.
[[Old State Capitol State Historic Site|
Old State Capitol]]: Abraham Lincoln and other area legislators were instrumental in moving the state capitol to centrally located Springfield in 1839.
Embarkation of Union troops from Cairo on January 10, 1862
Charles Mound, the highest natural point in Illinois at 1,235 feet above sea level, is located in the Driftless Area in the northwestern part of the state.
At 279 feet above sea level, the lowest elevation point in the state is located near Cairo and the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers.
Köppen climate types of Illinois
Density map displaying the population of Illinois
The Baháʼí House of Worship in Wilmette, Illinois
The Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago at the heart of Chicago's financial center
Byron Nuclear Generating Station in Ogle County
Average annual wind power distribution for Illinois, 50 m height above ground (2009)
Soldier Field, Chicago
The Illinois State Capitol in Springfield
Illinois House of Representatives
Governor J. B. Pritzker (D)
University of Illinois
University of Chicago
University of Illinois Willard Airport
Inside O'Hare International Airport
Vandalia State House State Historic Site in Vandalia
The Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago
Magnolia Manor is a Victorian period historic house museum in Cairo.
Lincoln Home National Historic Site in Springfield
The Polish Museum of America in Chicago
A Railway Post Office preserved at the Illinois Railway Museum in Union
Standard license plate introduced in 2017
Standard license plate 2001 to 2016
Illinois license plate design used throughout the 1980s and 1990s, displaying the Land of Lincoln slogan that has been featured on the state's plates since 1954

Following U.S. independence in 1783, American settlers began arriving from Kentucky via the Ohio River, and the population grew from south to north.

Kentucky River

Watershed of the Kentucky River, showing the North Fork, Middle Fork, and South Fork tributaries.
The North Fork near Combs.

The Kentucky River is a tributary of the Ohio River, 260 mi long, in the U.S. Commonwealth of Kentucky.

Mississippi River

Second-longest river and chief river of the second-largest drainage system on the North American continent, second only to the Hudson Bay drainage system.

The beginning of the Mississippi River at Lake Itasca (2004)
Former head of navigation, St. Anthony Falls, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Confluence of the Wisconsin and Mississippi Rivers, viewed from Wyalusing State Park in Wisconsin
The Upper Mississippi River at its confluence with the Missouri River north of St. Louis
The confluence of the Mississippi (left) and Ohio (right) rivers at Cairo, Illinois, the demarcation between the Middle and the Lower Mississippi River
Lower Mississippi River near New Orleans
Map of the Mississippi River watershed
Sequence of NASA MODIS images showing the outflow of fresh water from the Mississippi (arrows) into the Gulf of Mexico (2004)
View along the former riverbed at the Tennessee/Arkansas state line near Reverie, Tennessee (2007)
In Minnesota, the Mississippi River runs through the Twin Cities (2007)
Community of boathouses on the Mississippi River in Winona, MN (2006)
The Mississippi River at the Chain of Rocks just north of St. Louis (2005)
A low-water dam deepens the pool above the Chain of Rocks Lock near St. Louis (2006)
The Stone Arch Bridge, the Third Avenue Bridge and the Hennepin Avenue Bridge in Minneapolis (2004)
The Dubuque-Wisconsin Bridge (2004)
The Chain of Rocks Bridge at St. Louis, Missouri
The Hernando de Soto Bridge in Memphis, Tennessee (2009)
Vicksburg Bridge
Towboat and barges at Memphis, Tennessee
Ships on the lower part of the Mississippi
Oil tanker on the Lower Mississippi near the Port of New Orleans
Barge on the Lower Mississippi River
Lock and Dam No. 11, north of Dubuque, Iowa (2007)
Lock and Dam No. 2, near Hastings, Minnesota (2007)
Lock and Dam No. 15, is the largest roller dam in the world Davenport, Iowa; Rock Island, Illinois. (1990)
Formation of the Atchafalaya River and construction of the Old River Control Structure.
Project design flood flow capacity for the Mississippi river in thousands of cubic feet per second.
Soldiers of the Missouri Army National Guard sandbag the River in Clarksville, Missouri, June 2008, following flooding.
Discovery of the Mississippi by De Soto A.D. 1541 by William Henry Powell depicts Hernando de Soto and Spanish Conquistadores seeing the Mississippi River for the first time.
Map of the French settlements (blue) in North America in 1750, before the French and Indian War (1754 to 1763).
Ca. 1681 map of Marquette and Jolliet's 1673 expedition.
Route of the Marquette-Jolliete Expedition of 1673
A Home on the Mississippi (1871)
Shifting sand bars made early navigation difficult.
Battle of Vicksburg (ca. 1888)
Mississippi River from Eunice, Arkansas, a settlement destroyed by gunboats during the Civil War.
Campsite at the river in Arkansas
The Old River Control Structure complex. View is to the east-southeast, looking downriver on the Mississippi, with the three dams across channels of the Atchafalaya River to the right of the Mississippi. Concordia Parish, Louisiana is in the foreground, on the right, and Wilkinson County, Mississippi, is in the background, across the Mississippi on the left.
Great River Road in Wisconsin near Lake Pepin (2005)
The American paddlefish is an ancient relict from the Mississippi

The river either borders or passes through the states of Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana.

Shawnee

Algonquian-speaking indigenous people of the Northeastern Woodlands.

The Shawnee Prophet, Tenskwatawa (1775–1836), ca. 1820, portrait by Charles Bird King
Fort Ancient Monongahela cultures by Herb Roe
Serpent Mound, Peebles, Ohio
1715 map showing the land of the "Chaouanons" (Shawnee)
Tecumseh, by Benson Lossing in 1848 based on 1808 drawing.
This portrait of Harrison originally showed him in civilian clothes as the Congressional delegate from the Northwest Territory in 1800.
The Great Comet of 1811, as drawn by William Henry Smyth
The New Madrid earthquake was interpreted by the Muscogee as a reason to support the Shawnee resistance.
Flag of the Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma
Flag of the Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma
Flag of the Shawnee Tribe
First Shawnee Tribe coin issue: 2002—one dollar
Tecumseh commemorative dollar

In the 17th century they lived in Pennsylvania, and in the 18th century they were in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana with some bands in Kentucky and Alabama.

Kentucky Colonel

Becoming a Kentucky Colonel is recognition with Honorable Title granting Letters Patent and a Civilian Officer's Commission.
Governor Isaac Shelby, the first Kentucky governor to bestow the title of colonel to an aide-de-camp, in 1793.
Format of Kentucky Colonel Commission Certificate of 2020
Colonel Harland Sanders was commissioned by Governor Ruby Laffoon in 1935 and launched Kentucky Fried Chicken as a franchise chain in 1952.

Kentucky Colonel is the highest title of honor bestowed by the Commonwealth of Kentucky, and is the most well-known of a number of honorary colonelcies conferred by United States governors.

Chickasaw

Indigenous people of the Southeastern Woodlands.

A c. 1724 English copy of a deerskin Catawba map of the tribes between Charleston (left) and Virginia (right) following the displacements of a century of disease and enslavement and the 1715–7 Yamasee War. The Chickasaw are labeled as "Chickisa".
The second leg of the de Soto Expedition, from Apalachee to the Chicaza
Sculpture of a stylized 18th-century Chickasaw warrior by Enoch Kelly Haney, at the Chickasaw Cultural Center in Oklahoma
A sketch of a Chickasaw by Bernard Romans, 1775
Historic Marker in Marion, Arkansas for the Trail of Tears
In the 1850s Holmes Colbert (Chickasaw) helped write the constitution of the nation in Indian Territory.
Fred Tecumseh Waite, a cowboy and Chickasaw Nation statesman

Their traditional territory was in the Southeastern United States of Mississippi, Alabama, Missouri, and Tennessee as well in Kentucky.

Ohio River

981 mi long river in the United States.

Steamboat Morning Star, a Louisville and Evansville mail packet, in 1858.
Built between 1847 and 1849, the Wheeling Suspension Bridge was the first bridge across the river and a crucial part of the National Road.
Cave-in-rock, view on the Ohio (circa 1832, Cave-In-Rock, Illinois): aquatint by Karl Bodmer from the book Maximilian, Prince of Wied's Travels in the Interior of North America, during the years 1832–1834
Silver Bridge in Point Pleasant, West Virginia which collapsed into the Ohio River on December 15, 1967, killing 46 people.
A barge heads east on the Ohio River in Louisville, Kentucky.
The confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio rivers is at Cairo, Illinois.
The Ohio River as seen from Fredonia, Indiana.
Natural-color satellite image of the Wabash-Ohio confluence.
Lawrenceburg, Indiana, is one of many towns that use the Ohio as a shipping avenue.
Glacial Lake Ohio
The Allegheny River, left, and Monongahela River join to form the Ohio River at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the largest metropolitan area on the river.
Louisville, Kentucky, The deepest point of the Ohio River is a scour hole just below Cannelton locks and dam (river mile 720.7).
A barge hauls coal in the Louisville and Portland Canal, the only artificial portion of the Ohio River.
Cincinnati skyline showing the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge to Covington, Kentucky.
Carl Perkins Bridge in Portsmouth, Ohio with Ohio River and Scioto River tributary on right.
The Ohio River seen at Sciotoville, from the "Geography of Ohio," 1923

In his original draft of the Land Ordinance of 1784, Thomas Jefferson proposed a new state called "Pelisipia", to the south of the Ohio River, which would have included parts of present-day Eastern Kentucky, Virginia and West Virginia.