Ketubah

Ketubotketubamarriage contractketubbahcontractingKetubothJewish marriage contractsKetubbamarriage contractsilluminated Jewish marriage contracts
A Ketubah is a Jewish marriage contract.wikipedia
130 Related Articles

Bride price

bridewealthbride-pricebride wealth
It acted as a replacement of the biblical mohar – the price paid by the groom to the bride, or her parents, for the marriage (i.e., the bride price).
In the Jewish tradition, the rabbis in ancient times insisted on the marriage couple's entering into a marriage contract, called a ketubah.

Lieberman clause

(Conservative Jews often include an additional paragraph, called the Lieberman clause, which stipulates that divorce will be adjudicated by a modern rabbinical court (a beth din) in order to prevent the creation of a chained wife.)
The Lieberman clause is a clause included in a ketubah, a Jewish wedding document, created by and named after Talmudic scholar and Jewish Theological Seminary of America professor Saul Lieberman, that stipulates that divorce will be adjudicated by a modern Bet Din (rabbinic court) in order to prevent the problem of the agunah, a woman not allowed to remarry Jewish because she had never been granted a religious divorce.

Jewish wedding

weddingsweddingJewish ceremony
In a traditional Jewish wedding ceremony, the ketubah is signed by two witnesses and traditionally read out loud under the chuppah.
While wedding ceremonies vary, common features of a Jewish wedding include a ketubah (marriage contract) which is signed by two witnesses, a wedding canopy (chuppah or huppah), a ring owned by the groom that is given to the bride under the canopy and the breaking of a glass.

Get (divorce document)

getgittindivorce
The ketubah served as a contract, whereby the amount due to the wife (the bride-price) came to be paid in the event of the cessation of marriage, either by the death of the husband or divorce. The Mishna and Talmud Bavli record that the "Beth-Din of Kohanim" would oversee that the Ketubah of a Bat-Kohen would contract the amount of four hundred Zuz (an increase from the standard amount of two hundred Zuz) in the event the Bat-Kohen would be given a Get (bill of divorce) – the increase was written as the base amount due the Bat-Kohen and not as a bonus.

Agunah

agunotagunaagunos
(Conservative Jews often include an additional paragraph, called the Lieberman clause, which stipulates that divorce will be adjudicated by a modern rabbinical court (a beth din) in order to prevent the creation of a chained wife.)
The first, beginning in the 1950s, was the inclusion of the Lieberman clause, named for Talmudic scholar and Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS) professor Saul Lieberman, in the ketuba, requiring that a get be granted if a civil divorce is ever issued.

Conservative Judaism

ConservativeConservative JewishConservative movement
(Conservative Jews often include an additional paragraph, called the Lieberman clause, which stipulates that divorce will be adjudicated by a modern rabbinical court (a beth din) in order to prevent the creation of a chained wife.)
In 1954, the issue of agunot (women refused divorce by their husbands) was largely settled by adding a clause to the prenuptial contract under which men had to pay alimony as long as they did not concede.

Jewish views on marriage

marriageJewish view of marriageJewish marriage
It is considered an integral part of a traditional Jewish marriage, and outlines the rights and responsibilities of the groom, in relation to the bride.
The document that provides for this is the ketuba.

Chuppah

wedding canopychupahhuppah
In a traditional Jewish wedding ceremony, the ketubah is signed by two witnesses and traditionally read out loud under the chuppah.
The bethothal and chuppah ceremonies are separated by the reading of the ketubah.

David Bensoussan

Bensoussan has published two novels (La rosace du roi Salomon and L'énigme du roi Salomon), a memoir (Le fils de Mogador), two historical essays (L'Espagne des trois religions : grandeur et décadence de la convivencia and Il était une fois le Maroc), and, with Asher Knafo, an art book about illuminated Jewish marriage contracts (Mariage juif à Mogador).

Rabbi

rabbisOrthodox Rabbimara d'atra
The rabbis in ancient times insisted on the marriage couple entering into the ketubah as a protection for the wife.

Alimony

spousal supportmaintenancealimonies
A modern secular equivalent would be the entitlement to alimony in the event of divorce.

Cairo Geniza

Cairo GenizahGenizagenizah
Over two hundred ketubot were discovered, among other manuscripts, in the Cairo Geniza.

Micrography

micographymicrocalligraphy
They date between the 6th and 19th centuries and, whilst many consist of plain text, there are examples that use decorative devices such as micrography and illumination to elaborate them.

Illuminated manuscript

illuminatedilluminated manuscriptsilluminator
They date between the 6th and 19th centuries and, whilst many consist of plain text, there are examples that use decorative devices such as micrography and illumination to elaborate them.

Halakha

Jewish lawhalakhicHalacha
The content of the ketubah is in essence a one-way contract that formalizes the various requirements by Halakha (Jewish law) of a Jewish husband vis-à-vis his wife.

Beth din

dayanrabbinical courtbeit din
(Conservative Jews often include an additional paragraph, called the Lieberman clause, which stipulates that divorce will be adjudicated by a modern rabbinical court (a beth din) in order to prevent the creation of a chained wife.)

Mishnah

MishnaMishnaicmishnayot
The Mishna and Talmud Bavli record that the "Beth-Din of Kohanim" would oversee that the Ketubah of a Bat-Kohen would contract the amount of four hundred Zuz (an increase from the standard amount of two hundred Zuz) in the event the Bat-Kohen would be given a Get (bill of divorce) – the increase was written as the base amount due the Bat-Kohen and not as a bonus.

Talmud

Babylonian TalmudTalmudicTalmudist
The Mishna and Talmud Bavli record that the "Beth-Din of Kohanim" would oversee that the Ketubah of a Bat-Kohen would contract the amount of four hundred Zuz (an increase from the standard amount of two hundred Zuz) in the event the Bat-Kohen would be given a Get (bill of divorce) – the increase was written as the base amount due the Bat-Kohen and not as a bonus.

Zuz (Jewish coin)

ZuzzuzimZuz (coin)
The Mishna and Talmud Bavli record that the "Beth-Din of Kohanim" would oversee that the Ketubah of a Bat-Kohen would contract the amount of four hundred Zuz (an increase from the standard amount of two hundred Zuz) in the event the Bat-Kohen would be given a Get (bill of divorce) – the increase was written as the base amount due the Bat-Kohen and not as a bonus.

Jerusalem Talmud

Talmud YerushalmiYerushalmiYer.
The Talmud Yerushalmi opines that the Bat-Kohen who marries a non-Kohen receives that standard two hundred Zuz amount, as a penalty for not marrying within the greater family of Kohanim.

Amoraim

amoraAmoraicTalmudic sages
Based on the research of A. Epstien, in his work "Toldot HaKetubah B'Yisrael", the recording of Four hundred Zuz in the Ketubah of the Bat-Kohen was well in effect during the Amora period, but from thence onward, no mentioning of the increased amount is found in Rabbinic sources.

Jewish ceremonial art

Judaica artistically decorative spice containerceremonial objects
The ketubah is a significant popular form of Jewish ceremonial art.

Hebrew language

HebrewHebrew grammarHeb.
Traditional ketubot are not written in the Hebrew language, but in Aramaic, the lingua franca of Jews at the time ketubot became standardized.

Aramaic

Aramaic languageMiddle AramaicChaldee
Traditional ketubot are not written in the Hebrew language, but in Aramaic, the lingua franca of Jews at the time ketubot became standardized.