A report on Khandoba

Khandoba and Mhalsa killing demons Mani-Malla — a popular oleograph, c.1880.
The sanctum of Khandoba's older temple Kadepathar, Jejuri. Khandoba is worshipped in three forms: stone icon with the consorts (top), metal icon with Mhalsa (mid, covered with garlands) and two lingas, symbolizing him and Mhalsa.
Mani is seen worshipped in the Jejuri temple of Khandoba
Khandoba with his two chief wives: Mhalsa and Banai.
A painting depicts Khandoba riding a white horse with Mhalsa, accompanied with a dog and attendants including a Waghya dancing before him.
Khandoba in a household shrine (devghar) of a Deshastha Brahmin family
A Vaghya, the bard of Khandoba
Khandoba's newer Temple in Jejuri. Notice devotees showering turmeric powder (bhandara) on each other, in a temple festival.
Mylara Lingeshwara Temple at Mylara, Bellary District, Karnataka
Khandoba with Mhalsa, a company style painting from Tiruchirappalli. Khandoba is depicted with the traditional attributes of Shiva like the Trishula, damaru and the deer.
Khandoba with his wives at Mailar Mallanna temple, Khanapur near Bidar, Karnataka.

Hindu deity worshiped as a manifestation of Shiva mainly in the Deccan plateau of India, especially in the state of Maharashtra and North Karnataka.

- Khandoba
Khandoba and Mhalsa killing demons Mani-Malla — a popular oleograph, c.1880.

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Jejuri

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City and a municipal council in the Pune district of Maharashtra, India.

City and a municipal council in the Pune district of Maharashtra, India.

Khandoba temple
Long shot of Jejurigad's mandir on mountain
Stairs with arched entrance of the Jejuri Khandoba mandir
Sacred fire (Jyoti) in front of the Khandoba temple.
Deepstambha in front of the temple

The town has an important mandir to the Hindu Lord Khandoba, the Khandoba Mandir, which is one of the most visited tirtha (holy places) in Maharashtra.

Territory under Maratha control in 1760 (yellow), without its vassals

Marathi people

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Indo-Aryan ethnolinguistic group who are indigenous to Maharashtra in western India.

Indo-Aryan ethnolinguistic group who are indigenous to Maharashtra in western India.

Territory under Maratha control in 1760 (yellow), without its vassals
A watercolor painting of Pune from the late Peshwa era as seen from the confluence of the Mula and Mutha rivers, by British artist Henry Salt. The picture clearly shows the permanent features of the place and cremations. River confluences have been popular in Hinduism for cremations and also for ceremonial disposal of ashes
A replica Killa (fort) presented by a family at a Maharashtra Mandal Diwali program in United States
Deepmala Deep Stamb in Omkareshwar Temple in Pune
A Marathi household shrine with Khandoba at the forefront
Naivedya (Food offering) for the ancestors during a Pitru paksha ceremony
A Gudhi is erected on Gudhi Padwa.
Dnyaneshwar palakhi on its way to Pandharpur
Gokulashtami dahi-handi celebration
Woman playing Zimma on the night of a Mangala Gauri celebration in the Month of Shravan
Oxen decorated for Pola in a village.
A clay idol of Ganesh being immersed in water at the conclusion of the annual Ganeshotsav on the 11th day or Anant Chaturdashi
Women performing Bhondla dance during the festival of Navratri
Devotees showering turmeric powder (bhandara) on each other at Khandoba Temple in Jejuri during Champa Shashthi.
Traditional Sesame seed based sweets for Makar Sankrant
Shimga being celebrated on the port of Harne on the Konkan coast
Bullock cart race at a Jatra in Manchar, Maharashtra
A simple Maharashtrian meal with bhaaji, bhakari, raw onion and pickle
A typical Diwali plate of snack (faral ). Clockwise from top: chakli, kadboli, shev, gaathi, chivda and in the center are yellow besan and white rava ladu.
Princess Indira Raje (1892-1968) of Baroda as a young girl with her mother,
Chimnabai II, wearing a 'Nauvari', a traditional Maharashtrian sari

The Khandoba of Jejuri is an example of a Kuladaivat of some families; he is a common Kuladaivat to several castes ranging from Brahmins and Dhangar to Dalits.

Dhangar tribal from Maharashtra

Dhangar

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Herding caste of people found in the Indian states of Maharashtra, Karnataka, Goa, Madhya Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh.

Herding caste of people found in the Indian states of Maharashtra, Karnataka, Goa, Madhya Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh.

Dhangar tribal from Maharashtra
Ponies used by Dhangar tribe of Maharashtra

Another form of Shiva worshiped by Dhangars in Maharashtra is Malhar (Khandoba).

Maharashtra

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Maharashtra (, abbr.

Maharashtra (, abbr.

Late Harappa figure from Daimabad hoard, Indus Valley Civilization
2nd century BCE Karla Caves are a group of Buddhist caves near Lonavala
Bibi Ka Maqbara, a replica of the Taj Mahal, was built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb
Statue of Shivaji opposite Gateway of India in South Mumbai
The Bombay-Poona Mail Train of the GIPR company in 1907
Dried up the Godavari at Puntamba, Ahmadnagar district after a poor Monsoon
A Bengal tiger in Tadoba Andhari Tiger Reserve
Divisions of Maharashtra, along with their respective districts (With Palghar district formed in 2014 from the northern part of Thane district)
Siddhivinayak Temple, Mumbai. Hinduism is the dominant religion in Maharashtra
Mantralaya or administrative headquarters of Maharashtra state government in South Mumbai
The Bombay High Court, one of the oldest high courts in India
Mumbai is a major contributor to the economy of Maharashtra
Freshly grown sugarcane, agriculture is the second leading occupation in Maharashtra
Mumbai–Nashik Expressway
Students at a state-run primary school in Raigad district.
Founded in 1887, Veermata Jijabai Technological Institute (VJTI) is one of the oldest engineering colleges in Asia
Situated in Pune, Armed Forces Medical College, Pune was established in 1948 after the Indian independence.
Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth (Agricultural University) at Akola
A Primary Healthcare center in the village of Amboli in Pune district
Chandrapur Super Thermal Power Station, the state's power production source
Maharashtrian Veg Thali
Misal Paav, a popular dish from Maharashtra
A Girl and a Woman dressed in traditional Maharashtrian Nauvari lugada (nine-yard sari)
Lavani performance
Playwright Vijay Tendulkar
P L Deshpande (in center), one of the most popular authors in Marathi language
Times of India building in Mumbai
Children playing cricket in a farm outside the village of Chinawal in Jalgaon.
Night-time skyline of Downtown Mumbai at Nariman Point
Ganeshotsav festival in Pune
Khandoba mandir of Lord Khandoba in Jejuri
Venna Lake at Mahabaleshwar
Indian Tigers at Tadoba Tiger reserve
Pandharpur, a Hindu pilgrimage centre in the state

Khandoba temple at Jejuri in the Pune district attract pilgrims from all over the Maharashtra where worshipers shower each other with Bhandar,.

Shri Mangesh, also popularly known as Mangireesh or Manguesh, is the Presiding Deity at one of Goa's most popular prominent temples. Shri Mangesh is the Kuladevata of millions of Hindu GSBs around the world.

Kuladevata

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Ancestral tutelary deity in Hinduism, who is often the object of one's devotion in order to coax the deity to watch over one's clan (kula), family and children from misfortune.

Ancestral tutelary deity in Hinduism, who is often the object of one's devotion in order to coax the deity to watch over one's clan (kula), family and children from misfortune.

Shri Mangesh, also popularly known as Mangireesh or Manguesh, is the Presiding Deity at one of Goa's most popular prominent temples. Shri Mangesh is the Kuladevata of millions of Hindu GSBs around the world.
SrisriKashiswarJiu- kuladevata of Dutta Chowdhury family of Andul village.

In the state of Maharashtra, the Kuladevatas are mainly manifestations of Shiva or Shakti such as Khandoba or Bhavani, respectively.

Khandoba Mandir of Jejuri

Khandoba Temple, Jejuri

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Khandoba Mandir of Jejuri
Jejuri village in foreground and Khandoba mandir on the hill in background at Jejuri during, somewhere between 1855 and 1862
Side view of this temple
Deepstambha at Khandoba Mandir, Jejuri

Khandoba temple of Jejuri is a Hindu temple dedicated to the god Khandoba, located on a hill in the town of Jejuri, Maharashtra, India.

Khandoba and Mhalsa killing demons Mani-Malla — a popular oleograph, c.1880.

Mhalsa

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Hindu goddess.

Hindu goddess.

Khandoba and Mhalsa killing demons Mani-Malla — a popular oleograph, c.1880.
Mardol Temple in Goa

Mhalsa is also worshipped as the consort of the folk god Khandoba, a form of the god Shiva.

Shiva

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One of the principal deities of Hinduism.

One of the principal deities of Hinduism.

An ancient sculpture of Shiva at the Elephanta Caves, Maharashtra. 6th century CE
The Pashupati seal discovered during excavation of the Indus Valley archaeological site of Mohenjo-Daro and showing a possible representation of a "yogi" or "proto-Shiva" figure as Paśupati (= "Lord of the Animals"). Circa 2350-2000 BCE
Three-headed Shiva, Gandhara, 2nd century AD
Lingodbhava is a Shaiva sectarian icon where Shiva is depicted rising from the Lingam (an infinite fiery pillar) that narrates how Shiva is the foremost of the Trimurti; Brahma on the left and Vishnu on the right are depicted bowing to Shiva in the centre.
Ardhanarishvara sculpture, Khajuraho, depicting Shiva with goddess Parvati as his equal half. In the Ardhanarisvara concept, the icon is presented as half-man and half woman.
Oleograph by Raja Ravi Varma depicting a Shiva-centric Panchayatana. A bearded Shiva sits in the centre with his wife Parvati and their infant son Ganesha; surrounded by (clockwise from left upper corner) Ganesha, Devi, Vishnu, and Surya. Shiva's mount is the bull Nandi below Shiva.
Shiva with Parvati. Shiva is depicted three-eyed, the Ganges flowing through his matted hair, wearing ornaments of serpents and a skull garland, covered in ashes, and seated on a tiger skin.
A seated Shiva holds an axe and deer in his hands.
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Chola dynasty statue depicting Shiva dancing as Nataraja (Los Angeles County Museum of Art)
The 10th century five headed Shiva, Sadashiva, Cambodia
Shiva Lingam with tripundra
Shiva sculpture, Dieng Plateau in Java, Indonesia
Mahakala, c. 1500 CE Tibetan Thangka

An example of assimilation took place in Maharashtra, where a regional deity named Khandoba is a patron deity of farming and herding castes.

Khandoba with his two chief wives: Mhalsa and Banai

Banai (goddess)

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Khandoba with his two chief wives: Mhalsa and Banai
Khandoba with Mhalsa and Banai, at Mailar Mallanna Temple, Khanapur near Bidar, Karnataka
Painting on the outer wall of Banai's temple, Jejuri. Khandoba and Mhalsa are depicted killing the demons. Rarely, Banai replaces Mhalsa in the description of the incident.

Banai (बाणाई, sometimes बानाई), also known as Banu (Bāṇu, बानू) and Banu-bai (Bāṇu-bāī, बानू-बाई), is a Hindu goddess and the second wife of Khandoba, a form of the god Shiva worshipped in the Deccan – predominantly in the Indian states of Maharashtra and Karnataka.

Madhavarao Tanjavarkar (born 1828, died 4 April 1891), a descendant of Deshastha Brahmins with the last name Tanjavarkar or Thanjavurkar

Deshastha Brahmin

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Hindu Brahmin subcaste mainly from the Indian state of Maharashtra and northern area of the state of Karnataka.

Hindu Brahmin subcaste mainly from the Indian state of Maharashtra and northern area of the state of Karnataka.

Madhavarao Tanjavarkar (born 1828, died 4 April 1891), a descendant of Deshastha Brahmins with the last name Tanjavarkar or Thanjavurkar
Divisions of Maharashtra. The blue region is an approximate indication of the Desh.
Tatya Tope's Soldiery
Painting of 1st Diwan of Mysore Kingdom, Mir Miran Purnaiah by Irish painter Thomas Hickey
A Deshastha woman from the 1970s in her traditional attire, watering the holy basil plant (Tulsi at the Tulsi Vrindavan (plinth) in her yard
A typical Deshastha household Shrine called Deoghar.
Gudi Padwa Gudi or Victory pole
Tilgul is exchanged by Deshasthas on Makar Sankaranti. The centre shows sugarcoated sesame seeds surrounded by laddus of tilgul or sesame jaggery.
The main entrance to the Vithoba temple in Pandharpur

The Khandoba of Jejuri is an example of a Kuladaivat of some Maharashtrian Deshastha families; he is a common Kuladaivat to several castes ranging from Brahmins to Dalits.