Kiev

KyivKiev, UkraineKyiv, UkraineKijówKyevKyiv CityCity of KievKiev CityKiev, Soviet UnionKiew
Kiev or Kyiv is the capital and most populous city of Ukraine.wikipedia
9,765 Related Articles

Ukraine

UkrainianUKRUkrainia
Kiev or Kyiv is the capital and most populous city of Ukraine.
Its capital and largest city is Kiev.

Kiev Metro

metroKievKyiv Metro
The city has an extensive system of public transport and infrastructure, including the Kiev Metro.
The Kyiv Metro is a rapid transit system that is the mainstay of Kiev's public transport.

History of Kiev

Kievhistoryits history
During its history, Kiev, one of the oldest cities in Eastern Europe, passed through several stages of great prominence and relative obscurity.
According to legend, Kiev was founded by three brothers, Kyi, Shchek and Khoryv, and their sister Lybid.

Soviet Union

SovietUSSRSoviets
The city was almost completely ruined during World War II but quickly recovered in the postwar years, remaining the Soviet Union's third-largest city.
Other major urban centers were Leningrad, Kiev, Minsk, Tashkent, Alma-Ata, and Novosibirsk.

Kievan Rus'

Kievan RusRus'Rus
Under Varangian rule, the city became a capital of the Kievan Rus', the first East Slavic state. At some point during the late 9th or early 10th century Kiev fell under the rule of Varangians (see Askold and Dir, and Oleg of Novgorod) and became the nucleus of the Rus' polity.
He extended his control from Novgorod south along the Dnieper river valley to protect trade from Khazar incursions from the east, and he moved his capital to the more strategic Kiev.

Mongol invasion of Kievan Rus'

Mongol invasion of Rus'Mongol invasion of RusMongol invasion
Completely destroyed during the Mongol invasions in 1240, the city lost most of its influence for the centuries to come.
As part of the Mongol invasion of Europe, the Mongol Empire invaded Kievan Rus' in the 13th century, destroying numerous cities, including Ryazan, Kolomna, Moscow, Vladimir and Kiev.

Varangians

VarangianVolga VikingsVarangian Guard
A Slavic settlement on the great trade route between Scandinavia and Constantinople, Kiev was a tributary of the Khazars, until its capture by the Varangians (Vikings) in the mid-9th century. At some point during the late 9th or early 10th century Kiev fell under the rule of Varangians (see Askold and Dir, and Oleg of Novgorod) and became the nucleus of the Rus' polity.
According to the 12th century Kievan Primary Chronicle, a group of Varangians known as the Rus' settled in Novgorod in 862 under the leadership of Rurik.

History of Ukraine

Ukrainian historyUkrainehistory
Following the Soviet Union's collapse and Ukrainian independence in 1991, Kiev remained Ukraine's capital and experienced a steady influx of ethnic Ukrainian migrants from other regions of the country.
The Ukrainian Bolsheviks, who had defeated the national government in Kiev, established the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, which on 30 December 1922 became one of the founding republics of the Soviet Union.

Vikings

VikingNorseDanes
A Slavic settlement on the great trade route between Scandinavia and Constantinople, Kiev was a tributary of the Khazars, until its capture by the Varangians (Vikings) in the mid-9th century.
The Viking Rurik dynasty took control of territories in Slavic and Finno-Ugric-dominated areas of Eastern Europe; they annexed Kiev in 882 to serve as the capital of the Kievan Rus'.

Ukraine–European Union relations

Ambassador of Ukraine to the European UnionEuropean integrationAssociation Agreement
Kiev emerged as the most pro-Western region of Ukraine; parties advocating tighter integration with the European Union dominate during elections.
The first EU-Ukraine summit took place in September 1997 in Kiev.

List of European cities by population within city limits

Largest cities in Europelargest cityList of cities in Europe by population within city limits
Its population in July 2015 was 2,887,974 (though higher estimated numbers have been cited in the press), making Kiev the 7th most populous city in Europe.

Kyi, Shchek and Khoryv

KyiKyi, Schek and KhoryvKiy
The city's name is said to derive from the name of Kyi, one of its four legendary founders.
Kyi, Shchek and Khoryv are three legendary brothers often mentioned along with their sister Lybid, who, according to the Primary Chronicle, were the founders of the medieval city of Kiev, now the capital of Ukraine.

Primary Chronicle

Russian Primary ChronicleTale of Bygone YearsNestor Chronicle
Legendary accounts tell of the origin of the city; one legend features a founding-family, members of a Slavic tribe (Polans): the leader Kyi, the eldest, his brothers Shchek and Khoryv, and also their sister Lybid, who allegedly founded the city (See the Primary Chronicle).
The Tale of Bygone Years (, Pověstĭ vremęnĭnyxŭ lětŭ), known in English-language historiography as the Primary Chronicle or Rus' Primary Chronicle (RPC) or, after the author it has traditionally been ascribed to, Nestor's Chronicle or The Chronicle of Nestor, is a history of the Kyivan Rus' from about 850 to 1110, originally compiled in Kiev about 1113.

Cucuteni–Trypillia culture

Cucuteni-Trypillian cultureCucuteni cultureCucuteni-Trypillia culture
The population around Kiev during the Bronze Age formed part of so-called Tripillian culture, as witnessed by objects found in the area.
It extended from the Carpathian Mountains to the Dniester and Dnieper regions, centred on modern-day Moldova and covering substantial parts of western Ukraine and northeastern Romania, encompassing an area of 350,000 km2, with a diameter of 500 km (300 mi; roughly from Kyiv in the northeast to Brașov in the southwest).

Interfax-Ukraine

Interfax UkraineInterfax-UkrainaInterfax-Ukraïna
Interactive parliamentary election 2012 result maps by Ukrayinska Pravda Election results in Ukraine since 1998, Central Election Commission of Ukraine Nations and Nationalism: A Global Historical Overview, ABC-CLIO, 2008, ISBN: 1851099077 (page 1629) Ukraine on its Meandering Path Between East and West by Andrej Lushnycky and Mykola Riabchuk, Peter Lang, 2009, ISBN: 303911607X (page 122) After the parliamentary elections in Ukraine: a tough victory for the Party of Regions, Centre for Eastern Studies (7 November 2012) Communist and Post-Communist Parties in Europe by Uwe Backes and Patrick Moreau, Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2008, ISBN: 978-3-525-36912-8 (page 396) Party of Regions gets 185 seats in Ukrainian parliament, Batkivschyna 101 – CEC, Interfax-Ukraine (12 November 2012) UDAR submits to Rada resolution on Ukraine’s integration with EU, Interfax-Ukraine (8 January 2013) [http://www.ucipr.kiev.ua/publications/electronic-bulletin-your-choice-2012-issue-4-batkivshchyna/lang/en Electronic Bulletin "Your Choice – 2012".
The Interfax-Ukraine News Agency is a Kiev -based Ukrainian news agency founded in 1992.

Principality of Kiev

KievDuchy of Kievduchy
Since the Middle Ages an image of Saint Michael represented the city as well as the duchy.
The inner Principality of Kiev was a medieval East Slavic state, situated in central regions of modern Ukraine around the city of Kiev.

Askold

Askold and DirAsleikDir
The Primary Chronicle (a main source of information about the early history of the area) mentions Slavic Kievans telling Askold and Dir that they lived without a local ruler and paid a tribute to the Khazars in an entry attributed to the 9th century. At some point during the late 9th or early 10th century Kiev fell under the rule of Varangians (see Askold and Dir, and Oleg of Novgorod) and became the nucleus of the Rus' polity.
Askold (Haskuldr in Old East Norse and Hǫskuldr in Old West Norse) was a prince of Kiev and founder of the first Vikings' state in Dnieper.

Kievan Letter

Kievian Letter
The Primary Chronicle dates Oleg's conquest of the town in 882, but some historians, such as Omeljan Pritsak and Constantine Zuckerman, dispute this and maintain that Khazar rule continued as late as the 920s (documentary evidence exists to support this assertion – see the Kievian Letter and Schechter Letter).
930) letter thought to be written by representatives of the Jewish community in Kiev.

Ukrainian language

UkrainianUkrainian-languagemodern Ukrainian language
Kyiv is the romanized version of the name of the city used in modern Ukrainian.
In the 13th century, eastern parts of Rus' (including Moscow) came under Tatar yoke until their unification under the Tsardom of Muscovy, whereas the south-western areas (including Kiev) were incorporated into the Grand Duchy of Lithuania.

Andreas Umland

The Rise of the Radically Right-Wing All-Ukrainian Association "Svoboda"] by Andreas Umland, Centre for Geopolitical Studies (1 May 2011)
He lives in Kyiv, while teaching at the National University of "Kyiv-Mohyla Academy".

Vyshhorod

VyshgorodVyšgorod
He took many pieces of religious artwork - including the Theotokos of Vladimir icon - from nearby Vyshhorod.
Vyshhorod is a city in Kiev Oblast (region) in central Ukraine, the immediate northern suburb to the national capital Kiev, located upstream along the Dnieper River.

Oleg of Novgorod

OlegPrince OlegOleg of Kiev
At some point during the late 9th or early 10th century Kiev fell under the rule of Varangians (see Askold and Dir, and Oleg of Novgorod) and became the nucleus of the Rus' polity.
He is credited by Rus' Chronicles with moving from either Staraya Ladoga or Novgorod the Great, and seizing power in Kiev from Askold, and by doing so, laying the foundation of the powerful state of Kievan Rus'.

Andrew the Apostle

Saint AndrewSt AndrewSt. Andrew
Another legend states that Saint Andrew passed through the area (1st century CE), and where he erected a cross, a church was built.
The Chronicle of Nestor adds that he preached along the Black Sea and the Dnieper river as far as Kiev, and from there he traveled to Novgorod.

Virgin of Vladimir

Theotokos of VladimirOur Lady of VladimirMother of God icon of Vladimir
He took many pieces of religious artwork - including the Theotokos of Vladimir icon - from nearby Vyshhorod.
It was sent to Kiev as a gift before being transferred to the Assumption Cathedral in Vladimir.

Andrey Bogolyubsky

Andrei BogolyubskyAndrei I BogolyubskyAndrew the Pious
In March 1169 Grand Prince Andrey Bogolyubsky of Vladimir-Suzdal sacked Kiev, leaving the old town and the prince's hall in ruins.
His reign saw a complete decline of Kiev's rule over northeastern Rus, and the rise of Vladimir as the new capital city.