Kill the Indian, Save the Man

Kill the Indian, Save the Man: The Genocidal Impact of American Indian Residential SchoolsKill the Indian in him and save the man
Kill the Indian, Save the Man: The Genocidal Impact of American Indian Residential Schools is a 2004 book by the American writer Ward Churchill, then a professor at Colorado University and an activist in Native American issues.wikipedia
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Richard Henry Pratt

Captain Richard Henry PrattCaptain R. H. PrattCaptain Richard Pratt
The book's title comes from a quote attributed to Richard Henry Pratt, an Army officer who developed the Carlisle Indian School, the first (off-reservation) Indian boarding school, from his experience in educating Native American prisoners of war.
* [[Kill the Indian, Save the Man: The Genocidal Impact of American Indian Residential Schools]]

Ward Churchill

Churchill, WardPacifism as Pathology: Notes on an American Pseudopraxisa controversy
Kill the Indian, Save the Man: The Genocidal Impact of American Indian Residential Schools is a 2004 book by the American writer Ward Churchill, then a professor at Colorado University and an activist in Native American issues.
In Kill the Indian, Save the Man: The Genocidal Impact of American Indian Residential Schools (2004), Churchill traces the history of removing American Indian children from their homes to residential schools (in Canada) or Indian boarding schools (in the USA) as part of government policies (1880s–1980s) which he regards as genocidal.

University of Colorado Boulder

University of ColoradoUniversity of Colorado at BoulderUniversity of Colorado, Boulder
Kill the Indian, Save the Man: The Genocidal Impact of American Indian Residential Schools is a 2004 book by the American writer Ward Churchill, then a professor at Colorado University and an activist in Native American issues.

Activism

activistpolitical activistsocial activist
Kill the Indian, Save the Man: The Genocidal Impact of American Indian Residential Schools is a 2004 book by the American writer Ward Churchill, then a professor at Colorado University and an activist in Native American issues.

American Indian boarding schools

Indian boarding schoolNative American boarding schoolsboarding schools
Beginning in the late 19th century, it traces the history of the United States and Canadian governments establishing Indian boarding schools or residential schools, respectively, where Native American children were required to attend, to encourage their study of English, conversion to Christianity, and assimilation to the majority culture.

Canadian Indian residential school system

residential schoolresidential schoolsIndian residential school
Beginning in the late 19th century, it traces the history of the United States and Canadian governments establishing Indian boarding schools or residential schools, respectively, where Native American children were required to attend, to encourage their study of English, conversion to Christianity, and assimilation to the majority culture.

Indigenous peoples of the Americas

Native AmericanNative Americansindigenous
Beginning in the late 19th century, it traces the history of the United States and Canadian governments establishing Indian boarding schools or residential schools, respectively, where Native American children were required to attend, to encourage their study of English, conversion to Christianity, and assimilation to the majority culture.

Dawes Act

allotmentDawes Allotment ActDawes Act of 1887
He also addresses the effects of what is known as the Dawes Act, by which communal reservation land was allotted to individual households, and the blood quantum rules established at the time for enrollment in different tribes.

Blood quantum laws

blood quantumblood-quantumfull-blood
He also addresses the effects of what is known as the Dawes Act, by which communal reservation land was allotted to individual households, and the blood quantum rules established at the time for enrollment in different tribes.

Carlisle Indian Industrial School

Carlisle Indian SchoolCarlisleCarlisle Indian Boarding School
The book's title comes from a quote attributed to Richard Henry Pratt, an Army officer who developed the Carlisle Indian School, the first (off-reservation) Indian boarding school, from his experience in educating Native American prisoners of war.

City Lights Bookstore

City LightsCity Lights BooksCity Lights Publishers
The book by Churchill was published by City Lights Books in 2004 as a 158-page paperback (ISBN: 0-87286-434-0).

Raphael Lemkin

Rafael LemkinLemkinRafał Lemkin
The opening sequence defines Churchill's terms of reference by analyzing the meaning of genocide according to Raphael Lemkin.

United Nations Economic and Social Council

ECOSOCEconomic and Social CouncilUN Economic and Social Council
The ECOSOC Genocide Convention – Churchill writes – was ratified in Canada in 1952 and in the US in 1986 with notable objections to changes from nine other signatories.

Genocide Convention

Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of GenocideUN Genocide Conventionlegal definition of genocide
The ECOSOC Genocide Convention – Churchill writes – was ratified in Canada in 1952 and in the US in 1986 with notable objections to changes from nine other signatories.

Cultural genocide

cultural cleansingextinguishCultural Displacement
Churchill analyzes this as an act of cultural genocide, since the forced assimilationist policies (as school policies) prohibited the use of the students' own languages and their exercise of their own religions or cultural practices.

Cultural assimilation

assimilationassimilatedassimilate
Churchill analyzes this as an act of cultural genocide, since the forced assimilationist policies (as school policies) prohibited the use of the students' own languages and their exercise of their own religions or cultural practices.

Christian mission

missionmissionsChristian missionaries
Particularly in the early years, the schools were generally run by religious organizations, many of which had already established missions among the Native Americans.

Tuberculosis

consumptionpulmonary tuberculosisTB
He describes the often terrible conditions within these schools; poor nutrition, a high rate of then-untreatable tuberculosis - which devastated tribal communities, and other infectious diseases which were common during the times; Forced labor, and incidents of physical, sexual and emotional abuse, with Native students suffering a higher rate of mortality than children of their age group in the general population.

Unfree labour

forced laborforced labourunfree labor
He describes the often terrible conditions within these schools; poor nutrition, a high rate of then-untreatable tuberculosis - which devastated tribal communities, and other infectious diseases which were common during the times; Forced labor, and incidents of physical, sexual and emotional abuse, with Native students suffering a higher rate of mortality than children of their age group in the general population.

Abuse

abusiveabuse of officemaltreatment
He describes the often terrible conditions within these schools; poor nutrition, a high rate of then-untreatable tuberculosis - which devastated tribal communities, and other infectious diseases which were common during the times; Forced labor, and incidents of physical, sexual and emotional abuse, with Native students suffering a higher rate of mortality than children of their age group in the general population.

Alcoholism

alcoholicalcoholicsalcohol
He notes that many graduates have reported being damaged by their experiences and have suffered high rates of alcoholism that continued to be a problem for Native Americans outside of the school experience, as well as suicide.

Suicide

suicidalcommitted suicidesuicides
He notes that many graduates have reported being damaged by their experiences and have suffered high rates of alcoholism that continued to be a problem for Native Americans outside of the school experience, as well as suicide.

A Little Matter of Genocide

The author intended the book to compensate for his not having covered the boarding schools and their issues in his 1979 book A Little Matter of Genocide. It includes numerous photos and lists of such historic schools in the US and Canada.

Institutional racism

systemic racisminstitutionalized racisminstitutionally racist
From 1879 on these schools were modelled after the Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania, whose motto was "Kill the Indian in him and save the man".