Kilobaud Microcomputing

KilobaudKilobaud MagazineMicrocomputing
Kilobaud Microcomputing was a magazine dedicated to the computer homebrew hobbyists from 1977 to 1983.wikipedia
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Byte (magazine)

BYTEByte MagazineByte'' magazine
Wayne Green, the editor and publisher of kilobaud, had been the publisher of BYTE magazine, (another influential microcomputer magazine of the time) where he published the first four issues in his own office.
The new magazine was called Kilobaud.

Wayne Green

inCiderinCider Magazine
Wayne Green, the editor and publisher of kilobaud, had been the publisher of BYTE magazine, (another influential microcomputer magazine of the time) where he published the first four issues in his own office.
Green was formerly editor of CQ magazine before he went on to found 73, 80 Micro, Byte, CD Review, Cold Fusion, Kilobaud Microcomputing, RUN, InCider, and Pico, as well as publishing books and running Instant Software.

80 Micro

80 Microcomputing80-Micro
After the success of kilobaud, Wayne Green diversified with magazines targeted to specific brands of home computers, such as 80-Microcomputing (also known as 80-Micro) a Magazine for TRS-80 users, InCider a magazine for Apple II users, Hot CoCo a magazine for TRS-80 Color Computers, RUN a magazine for Commodore 64 users and many others.
Wayne Green, the creator of many magazines such as 73, founded 80 Microcomputing as a spinoff of his Kilobaud Microcomputing solely for Tandy Corporation's Radio Shack TRS-80 Model I microcomputer.

Home computer

home computershomehome computing
After the success of kilobaud, Wayne Green diversified with magazines targeted to specific brands of home computers, such as 80-Microcomputing (also known as 80-Micro) a Magazine for TRS-80 users, InCider a magazine for Apple II users, Hot CoCo a magazine for TRS-80 Color Computers, RUN a magazine for Commodore 64 users and many others.
In 1980 Wayne Green, the publisher of Kilobaud Microcomputing, recommended that companies avoid the term "home computer" in their advertising as "I feel is self-limiting for sales ... I prefer the term "microcomputers" since it doesn't limit the uses of the equipment in the imagination of the prospective customers".

TRS-80

TRS-80 Model ITRS-80 Model IIITandy TRS-80
After the success of kilobaud, Wayne Green diversified with magazines targeted to specific brands of home computers, such as 80-Microcomputing (also known as 80-Micro) a Magazine for TRS-80 users, InCider a magazine for Apple II users, Hot CoCo a magazine for TRS-80 Color Computers, RUN a magazine for Commodore 64 users and many others.
Kilobaud Microcomputing estimated that it was selling three times as many computers as Apple Computer, with both companies ahead of Commodore.

Homebrew Computer Club

homebrewcomputer homebrew
Kilobaud Microcomputing was a magazine dedicated to the computer homebrew hobbyists from 1977 to 1983.

ABC 80

ABC80ABC 80 performance testLuxor ABC 80
* ABC 80 performance test
In order to see how the ABC 80 would compare to other contemporary personal computers, in 1982, the Swedish magazine MikroDatorn performed a "benchmark" test using eight short BASIC programs (referred to as BM1~BM8) defined by the American Kilobaud Magazine and routinely used by the British magazine Personal Computer World for testing new machines.

Magazine

magazinesquarterlyjournal
Kilobaud Microcomputing was a magazine dedicated to the computer homebrew hobbyists from 1977 to 1983.

Hobby

hobbieshobbyistpastime
Kilobaud Microcomputing was a magazine dedicated to the computer homebrew hobbyists from 1977 to 1983.

Microcomputer

microcomputersmicrocomputingmicro-computer
Wayne Green, the editor and publisher of kilobaud, had been the publisher of BYTE magazine, (another influential microcomputer magazine of the time) where he published the first four issues in his own office.

Computer magazine

Computer magazinesmagazinemagazines
Wayne Green, the editor and publisher of kilobaud, had been the publisher of BYTE magazine, (another influential microcomputer magazine of the time) where he published the first four issues in his own office.

Virginia Williamson

Virginia Londner GreenVirginia Green
Consequently, the January 1976 issue had Virginia Green listed as publisher instead of Wayne Green.

Baud

megabaudkilobaudBaud rate
So he named the new magazine "kilobaud" instead.

Apple II

Apple 2AppleApple II Plus
After the success of kilobaud, Wayne Green diversified with magazines targeted to specific brands of home computers, such as 80-Microcomputing (also known as 80-Micro) a Magazine for TRS-80 users, InCider a magazine for Apple II users, Hot CoCo a magazine for TRS-80 Color Computers, RUN a magazine for Commodore 64 users and many others.

TRS-80 Color Computer

Color ComputerTandy Color ComputerTandy Color Computer 3
After the success of kilobaud, Wayne Green diversified with magazines targeted to specific brands of home computers, such as 80-Microcomputing (also known as 80-Micro) a Magazine for TRS-80 users, InCider a magazine for Apple II users, Hot CoCo a magazine for TRS-80 Color Computers, RUN a magazine for Commodore 64 users and many others.

Run (magazine)

RUNRUN'' magazineRUN Magazine
After the success of kilobaud, Wayne Green diversified with magazines targeted to specific brands of home computers, such as 80-Microcomputing (also known as 80-Micro) a Magazine for TRS-80 users, InCider a magazine for Apple II users, Hot CoCo a magazine for TRS-80 Color Computers, RUN a magazine for Commodore 64 users and many others.

Commodore 64

C6464Commodore
After the success of kilobaud, Wayne Green diversified with magazines targeted to specific brands of home computers, such as 80-Microcomputing (also known as 80-Micro) a Magazine for TRS-80 users, InCider a magazine for Apple II users, Hot CoCo a magazine for TRS-80 Color Computers, RUN a magazine for Commodore 64 users and many others.

Homebuilt computer

system builderbuild-your-own-ATbuilding their own
Even more than Byte magazine, kilobaud contained articles written for people who were building their own 8-bit microcomputers at home, or were writing homebrew software for these systems.

8-bit

8-bit computereight-bit8
Even more than Byte magazine, kilobaud contained articles written for people who were building their own 8-bit microcomputers at home, or were writing homebrew software for these systems.

Electronic engineering

Electronics and Communication EngineeringElectronics Engineeringelectronic engineer
kilobaud, (much more than Byte) contained articles written for electronic engineers (or hobbyists interested in electronics), rather than for people who were technically interested in computers but not in building their own computer from scratch.

Electronics

electronicelectronic equipmentelectronic device
kilobaud, (much more than Byte) contained articles written for electronic engineers (or hobbyists interested in electronics), rather than for people who were technically interested in computers but not in building their own computer from scratch.

Scratch building

scratchbuildingscratchscratch-built
kilobaud, (much more than Byte) contained articles written for electronic engineers (or hobbyists interested in electronics), rather than for people who were technically interested in computers but not in building their own computer from scratch.

Rail transport modelling

model railwaymodel railroadmodel train
Articles like "Two Hobbies: Model Railroading and Computing" and the article (written by Don Lancaster) "Building a cheap video display for your Heathkit H-8" (a computer you could build yourself from a kit) are good examples.

Don Lancaster

Articles like "Two Hobbies: Model Railroading and Computing" and the article (written by Don Lancaster) "Building a cheap video display for your Heathkit H-8" (a computer you could build yourself from a kit) are good examples.

TV Typewriter

The TV Cheap Video Cookbookvideo display
Articles like "Two Hobbies: Model Railroading and Computing" and the article (written by Don Lancaster) "Building a cheap video display for your Heathkit H-8" (a computer you could build yourself from a kit) are good examples.