Kim Duk-koo

Duk Koo KimDuk-Koo KimKim Deuk-gu
Kim Duk-koo (July 29, 1955 – November 18, 1982) was a South Korean boxer who died after fighting in a world championship boxing match against Ray Mancini.wikipedia
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Boxing

boxerboxersprofessional boxer
Kim Duk-koo (July 29, 1955 – November 18, 1982) was a South Korean boxer who died after fighting in a world championship boxing match against Ray Mancini.
Fifteen rounds remained the internationally recognized limit for championship fights for most of the 20th century until the early 1980s, when the death of boxer Kim Duk-koo eventually prompted the World Boxing Council and other organizations sanctioning professional boxing to reduce the limit to twelve rounds.

Ray Mancini

Ray "Boom Boom" ManciniBoom Boom ManciniRay 'Boom Boom' Mancini
Kim Duk-koo (July 29, 1955 – November 18, 1982) was a South Korean boxer who died after fighting in a world championship boxing match against Ray Mancini.
On November 13, 1982, a 21-year-old Mancini met 23-year-old South Korean challenger Duk Koo Kim.

Richard Green (referee)

Richard Green
Kim managed to rise unsteadily to his feet, but referee Richard Green stopped the fight and Mancini was declared the winner by TKO nineteen seconds into the 14th round.
He was the referee for the lightweight world title fight between defending champion Ray Mancini and challenger Duk Koo Kim, which caused Kim's death four days after the fight ended.

World Boxing Council

WBCWBC SilverWBC FECARBOX
The WBC, which was not the fight's sanctioning organization, announced during its annual convention of 1982 that many rules concerning fighters' medical care before fights needed to be changed.
In 1983, following the death of Kim Duk-koo from injuries sustained in a 14-round fight against Ray Mancini, the WBC took the unprecedented step of reducing the distance of its world championship bouts, from 15 rounds to 12—a move other organizations soon followed (for boxers' safety).

Mike Weaver (boxer)

Mike WeaverMichael WeaverMike "Hercules" Weaver
Four weeks after the fatal fight, the Mike Weaver vs. Michael Dokes fight at the same Caesars Palace venue ended with a technical knockout declared 63 seconds into the fight.
However, four weeks earlier, the fatal fight between Ray Mancini and Duk Koo Kim at Caesars' Palace had taken place where Kim died as a result of a brain injury.

Joey Curtis

Referee Joey Curtis admitted to stopping the fight early under orders of the Nevada State Athletic Commission, which required referees to be aware of a fighter's health, in light of the ManciniKim fight, and a rematch was ordered.
The WBA investigated the fight, and during the investigation, it was revealed that Curtis had been told by the Nevada Athletic Commission to be mindful of the condition of the fighters after the November 18 death of Duk Koo Kim as the result of a fight with Ray Mancini in Las Vegas on November 13.

South Korea

Republic of KoreaKoreaKOR
Kim Duk-koo (July 29, 1955 – November 18, 1982) was a South Korean boxer who died after fighting in a world championship boxing match against Ray Mancini.

Seoul

Seoul, South KoreaSeoul, KoreaHanseong
Kim was born in Gangwon Province, South Korea, 100 miles east of Seoul, the youngest of five children.

World Boxing Association

WBAWBA (Super)National Boxing Association
In February 1982, he won the Orient and Pacific Boxing Federation lightweight title and became the World Boxing Association's number 1 contender. Kim carried a 17–1–1 professional record into the Mancini fight and had won 8 bouts by KO before flying to Las Vegas as the world's (WBA) number 1 challenger to world lightweight champion Mancini.

Las Vegas Valley

Las VegasLas Vegas, NevadaLas Vegas, Nevada, USA
Kim carried a 17–1–1 professional record into the Mancini fight and had won 8 bouts by KO before flying to Las Vegas as the world's (WBA) number 1 challenger to world lightweight champion Mancini.

Caesars Palace

Caesar's PalaceCircus Maximus ShowroomCPL
Mancini and Kim met in an arena outside Caesars Palace on November 13, 1982.

Sugar Ray Leonard

Ray LeonardRay Charles LeonardSugar" Ray Leonard
Sugar Ray Leonard (working as one of the commentators of the fight) said Kim came right back very strong.

Ralph Wiley

Ralph Wiley of Sports Illustrated, covering the fight, would later recall Kim pulling himself up the ropes as he was dying as "one of the greatest physical feats I had ever witnessed".

Coma

comatoseunresponsivecomatose state
Minutes after the fight was over, Kim collapsed into a coma and was removed from the Caesars Palace arena on a stretcher and taken to the Desert Springs Hospital.

Subdural hematoma

subdural haematomasubdural hemorrhageacute subdural hematoma
At the hospital, he was found to have a subdural hematoma consisting of 100 cubic centimeters of blood in his skull.

Neurosurgery

neurosurgeonbrain surgeryneurosurgical
Emergency brain surgery was performed at the hospital to try to save him, but Kim died four days after the bout, on November 18.

Sports Illustrated

SI.comSISports Illustrated Magazine
The week after, Sports Illustrated published a photo of the fight on its cover, under the heading Tragedy in the Ring.

CBS

CBS TelevisionColumbia Broadcasting SystemCBS-TV
The profile of the incident was heightened by the fight having been televised live by CBS in the United States.

Knockout

technical knockoutTKOKO
Kim managed to rise unsteadily to his feet, but referee Richard Green stopped the fight and Mancini was declared the winner by TKO nineteen seconds into the 14th round.

Bob Arum

Robert Arum
His promoter, Bob Arum, said Mancini "was never the same" after Kim's death.

Livingstone Bramble

Two years later, Mancini lost his title to Livingstone Bramble.