Kindergarten

KYear KkindergartensJunior KindergartenLKGKGPreppre-primaryJKkindergartner
Kindergarten (, ; from German ) is a preschool educational approach based on playing, singing, practical activities such as drawing, and social interaction as part of the transition from home to school.wikipedia
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Friedrich Fröbel

FröbelFroebelFriedrich Wilhelm August Fröbel
The term was coined by the German Friedrich Fröbel, whose approach globally influenced early-years education. Friedrich Fröbel (1782–1852) opened a "play and activity" institute in 1837 in the village of Bad Blankenburg in the principality of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt, Thuringia, as an experimental social experience for children entering school. Historically the word was used during the nineteenth century when activists like Adelaide Manning were introducing educators to the work of Friedrich Fröbel.
He created the concept of the "kindergarten" and coined the word, which soon entered the English language as well.

Learning space

contemporary learning spaceslearning spaceseducational setting
Today, the term is used in many countries to describe a variety of educational institutions and learning spaces for children ranging from one to seven years of age, based on a variety of teaching methods.
Kindergarten is a German word whose literal meaning is "garden for the children", however the term was coined in the metaphorical sense of "place where children can grow in a natural way".

Educational institution

educational institutionseducational instituteinstitution
Today, the term is used in many countries to describe a variety of educational institutions and learning spaces for children ranging from one to seven years of age, based on a variety of teaching methods.

Elizabeth Peabody

Elizabeth Palmer PeabodyElizabethElizabeth P. Peabody
Elizabeth Peabody founded the first English-language kindergarten in the US in 1860.
Elizabeth Palmer Peabody (May 16, 1804 – January 3, 1894) was an American educator who opened the first English-language kindergarten in the United States.

First Kindergarten

first kindergarten building
The first kindergarten in the US was founded in Watertown, Wisconsin in 1856 and was conducted in German by Margaretha Meyer-Schurz.
The First Kindergarten in Watertown, Wisconsin is the building that housed the first kindergarten in the United States, opened in 1856.

Susan Blow

Susan Elizabeth BlowSusan E. Blow
The first publicly financed kindergarten in the US was established in St. Louis in 1873 by Susan Blow.
Susan Elizabeth Blow (June 7, 1843 – March 27, 1916) was an American educator who opened the first successful public kindergarten in the United States.

Alsace

AlsatianAlsatiansElsass
Such institutions were originally created in the late 18th century in Bavaria and Alsace to serve children whose parents both worked outside home.
German is also taught as a foreign language in local kindergartens and schools.

Conrad Poppenhusen

Poppenhusen, Conrad
The first free kindergarten in the US was founded in 1870 by Conrad Poppenhusen, a German industrialist and philanthropist, who also established the Poppenhusen Institute.
He was also a philanthropist, a founder of College Point, Queens, and the founder of the first free kindergarten in the United States (on July 1, 1870).

Early childhood education

early childhoodEEchild education
Elizabeth Harrison wrote extensively on the theory of early childhood education and worked to enhance educational standards for kindergarten teachers by establishing what became the National College of Education in 1886.
The formalization of these arrangements emerged in the nineteenth century with the establishment of kindergartens for educational purposes and day nurseries for care in much of Europe and North America, Brazil, China, India, Jamaica and Mexico.

Poppenhusen Institute

The first free kindergarten in the US was founded in 1870 by Conrad Poppenhusen, a German industrialist and philanthropist, who also established the Poppenhusen Institute.
Poppenhusen Institute is a historic building at 114—04 14th Road in College Point, Queens that housed the first free kindergarten in America.

Elizabeth Harrison (educator)

Elizabeth Harrison
Elizabeth Harrison wrote extensively on the theory of early childhood education and worked to enhance educational standards for kindergarten teachers by establishing what became the National College of Education in 1886.
After encountering the early kindergarten movement in Chicago in the 1870s and studying with early kindergarten educator Alice Putnam, Harrison sought further training in St. Louis and New York.

National Louis University

National-Louis UniversityNational College of EducationChicago Kindergarten College
Elizabeth Harrison wrote extensively on the theory of early childhood education and worked to enhance educational standards for kindergarten teachers by establishing what became the National College of Education in 1886.
National Louis University (NLU) began in 1886, when Elizabeth Harrison founded the school to train "Kindergarteners", young women teachers who began the early childhood education movement.

Suddaby Public School

Central School
in 1882, The country's first public-school kindergartens were established in Berlin, Ontario (modern Kitchener) at the Central School.
It serves grades Junior Kindergarten (JK) through grade 6.

First grade

11st gradeGrade 1
Together, these two kinds of institutions enroll 86% at age 3 and 99% at age 5 prior to their entrance into the formal system at first grade.
It is the first school year after kindergarten in Canada and the USA.

Bad Blankenburg

Blankenburg BlankenburgBlankenburg, Thuringia
Friedrich Fröbel (1782–1852) opened a "play and activity" institute in 1837 in the village of Bad Blankenburg in the principality of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt, Thuringia, as an experimental social experience for children entering school.
It is most famous for being the location of the first kindergarten of Friedrich Wilhelm August Fröbel, in 1837.

Forest kindergarten

kindergartenswood" group
Denmark is credited with pioneering (although not inventing) forest kindergartens, in which children spend most of every day outside in a natural environment. Many Kindergärten follow a certain educational approach, such as Montessori, Reggio Emilia, "Berliner Bildungsprogramm" or Waldorf; forest kindergartens are well established.
A forest kindergarten can be described as a kindergarten "without a ceiling or walls".

State school

Publicpublic high schoolpublic school
Previous nursery is optional and may be offered in either private schools or public schools.
State education generally encompasses primary and secondary education (kindergarten to twelfth grade, or equivalent), as well as post-secondary educational institutions such as universities, colleges, and technical schools that are funded and overseen by government rather than by private entities.

St. Louis

St. Louis, MissouriSt. Louis, MOSaint Louis, Missouri
The first publicly financed kindergarten in the US was established in St. Louis in 1873 by Susan Blow.
These schools are sponsored by local institutions or corporations and take in students from kindergarten through high school.

Pedagogy

pedagoguepedagogicalpedagogic
In 1816, Robert Owen, a philosopher and pedagogue, opened the first British and probably globally the first infants school in New Lanark, Scotland.
In Scandinavia, a pedagogue (pædagog) is broadly speaking a practitioner of pedagogy, but the term is primarily reserved for individuals who occupy jobs in pre-school education (such as kindergartens and nurseries).

German language

GermanGerman-languageGerman-speaking
Kindergarten (, ; from German ) is a preschool educational approach based on playing, singing, practical activities such as drawing, and social interaction as part of the transition from home to school.

Preschool

pre-schoolnursery schoolnursery
Kindergarten (, ; from German ) is a preschool educational approach based on playing, singing, practical activities such as drawing, and social interaction as part of the transition from home to school.
A preschool, also known as nursery school, pre-primary school, playschool or kindergarten, is an educational establishment or learning space offering early childhood education to children before they begin compulsory education at primary school.

Adelaide Manning

Elizabeth Adelaide Manning
Historically the word was used during the nineteenth century when activists like Adelaide Manning were introducing educators to the work of Friedrich Fröbel.
She championed kindergartens.

K–12

K-12K-12 schoolK-12 education
In the US, kindergarten is usually part of the K-12 educational system.
K–12 (spoken as "k twelve", "k through twelve", or "k to twelve"), for kindergarten to 12th grade, is an American expression that indicates the number of years of publicly supported primary and secondary education found in the USA, which is similar to publicly supported school grades prior to college in several other countries, such as Afghanistan, Australia, Canada, Ecuador, Egypt, India, Iran, Philippines, South Korea, Turkey.

Reggio Emilia approach

Reggio EmiliaReggioReggio Emilia philosophy
Many Kindergärten follow a certain educational approach, such as Montessori, Reggio Emilia, "Berliner Bildungsprogramm" or Waldorf; forest kindergartens are well established.
In Reggio Emilia, the infant/toddler and pre-primary program is a vital part of the community, as reflected in the high level of financial support.

Waldorf education

Waldorf schoolWaldorfSteiner School
Many Kindergärten follow a certain educational approach, such as Montessori, Reggio Emilia, "Berliner Bildungsprogramm" or Waldorf; forest kindergartens are well established.
That school is now an award-winning government-funded school with over 650 students offering classes for kindergarten and years 1 to 11 (the Russian education system is an eleven year system).