King's Own Scottish Borderers

25th Regiment of Foot25th Foot25thThe King's Own Scottish Borderers1st Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers25th (Sussex) Regiment of Foot25th RegimentK.O.S.B.King's Own BorderersKOSB
The King's Own Scottish Borderers was a line infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Scottish Division.wikipedia
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Royal Scots

1st Regiment of Foot1st Foot1st Royals
On 28 March 2006 the regiment was amalgamated with the Royal Scots, the Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment), the Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment), the Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons) and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland, becoming the 1st Battalion of the new regiment.
The regiment existed continuously until 2006, when it amalgamated with the King's Own Scottish Borderers to become the Royal Scots Borderers, which merged with the Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment), the Black Watch, the Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons) and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders

Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders)1st Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highland Regiment93rd Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
On 28 March 2006 the regiment was amalgamated with the Royal Scots, the Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment), the Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment), the Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons) and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland, becoming the 1st Battalion of the new regiment.
As part of the restructuring of the British Army's infantry in 2006, the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders were amalgamated with the Royal Scots, the King's Own Scottish Borderers, the Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment), the Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) and the Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons) into the seven battalion strong Royal Regiment of Scotland.

Royal Regiment of Scotland

The Royal Regiment of Scotland3rd Battalion, The Black WatchGolden Highlanders
On 28 March 2006 the regiment was amalgamated with the Royal Scots, the Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment), the Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment), the Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons) and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland, becoming the 1st Battalion of the new regiment.
The regiment consists of a total of seven battalions: one of these was formed by the amalgamation of the Royal Scots and King's Own Scottish Borderers, while the others are each formed from one of the remaining single-battalion regiments of the Scottish Division.

Royal Scots Borderers

The Royal Scots Borderers1st Battalion1 SCOTS
On 28 March 2006 the regiment was amalgamated with the Royal Scots, the Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment), the Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment), the Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons) and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland, becoming the 1st Battalion of the new regiment. This was not a new idea: the origins of the combined entity, Royal Scots Borderers, dates from the 1990 Options for Change review, when it was initially announced that the Royal Scots and King's Own Scottish Borderers would amalgamate.
When the Scottish infantry regiments amalgamated to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland on 28 March 2006, the Royal Scots Battalion and the King's Own Scottish Borderers Battalion initially maintained their identities as separate battalions.

Howth gun-running

Howth1700 rifles in Howtha counter operation
They killed four civilians and wounded 38 after opening fire on a group of unarmed civilians on the day of the Howth gun-running in July 1914.
As the King's Own Scottish Borderers returned to barracks, they were accosted by civilians at Bachelors Walk, who threw stones and exchanged insults with the regulars.

Bachelor's Walk massacre

fire on a crowd of protestors at Bachelors Walk
They killed four civilians and wounded 38 after opening fire on a group of unarmed civilians on the day of the Howth gun-running in July 1914. The Bachelor's Walk massacre happened in Dublin, on 26 July 1914, when a column of troops of the King's Own Scottish Borderers were accosted by a crowd on Bachelor's Walk.
The Bachelor's Walk massacre happened in Dublin, on 26 July 1914, when a column of troops of the King's Own Scottish Borderers were accosted by a crowd on Bachelor's Walk.

Imphal Barracks

Fulford BarracksImphal Barracks, YorkYork
The regiment was not fundamentally affected by the Cardwell Reforms of the 1870s, which gave it a depot at Fulford Barracks in York from 1873, or by the Childers reforms of 1881 – as it already possessed two battalions, there was no need for it to amalgamate with another regiment.
Under the Cardwell Reforms the two battalions of the 25th (Sussex) Regiment of Foot also established a depot at the barracks but following the Childers Reforms that regiment evolved to become the King's Own Scottish Borderers and moved to Berwick Barracks in 1881.

28th Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

28th Infantry Brigade28th British Commonwealth Brigade28th Commonwealth Brigade
The 6th (Service) Battalion landed at Boulogne-sur-Mer as part of the 28th Brigade in the 9th (Scottish) Division in May 1915 for service on the Western Front.
It was initially composed of the 6th (Service) Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers, 9th (Service) Battalion, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles), and the 10th and 11th (Service) battalions of the Highland Light Infantry.

13th Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

13th Infantry Brigade13th Brigade13th
During the Home Rule Crisis in 1914, the 2nd Battalion was stationed in Dublin as part of 13th Brigade in the 5th Division.
2nd Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers

Battle of Culloden

CullodenCulloden BattlefieldJacobite defeat at Culloden
For a period it was known as Semphill's Regiment of Foot, the name under which it fought at the Battle of Fontenoy in 1745 and the Battle of Culloden in 1746.
Huske ordered forward all of Lord Sempill's Fourth Brigade which had a combined total of 1,078 men (Sempill's 25th Foot, Conway's 59th Foot, and Wolfe's 8th Foot).

Attack on Derryard checkpoint

Derryard checkpointBritish Army permanent checkpoint in DerryardDerryard
The regiment was deployed during the Malayan Emergency in the late 1950s and was regularly posted to Northern Ireland as part of Operation Banner during the Troubles and suffered casualties during the 1989 Derryard attack which killed two of their men.
On 13 December 1989 the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) attacked a British Army permanent vehicle checkpoint complex manned by the King's Own Scottish Borderers (KOSB) near the Northern Ireland–Republic of Ireland border at Derryard, north of Rosslea, County Fermanagh.

Childers Reforms

reforms1881Childers
The regiment was not fundamentally affected by the Cardwell Reforms of the 1870s, which gave it a depot at Fulford Barracks in York from 1873, or by the Childers reforms of 1881 – as it already possessed two battalions, there was no need for it to amalgamate with another regiment.

5th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

5th Division5th Infantry DivisionBritish 5th Infantry Division
During the Home Rule Crisis in 1914, the 2nd Battalion was stationed in Dublin as part of 13th Brigade in the 5th Division.
2nd Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers

52nd (Lowland) Infantry Division

52nd (Lowland) Division52nd (Lowland)Lowland Division
The 1/4th (Border) Battalion and the 1/5th (Dumfries & Galloway) Battalion landed in Gallipoli as part of the 155th Brigade in the 52nd (Lowland) Division in June 1915.
1/4th (The Border) Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers

Scottish Division

British Scottish DivisionScottish infantry regimentsScottish, Welsh and Irish Division
The King's Own Scottish Borderers was a line infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Scottish Division.
Changes announced in 2004 involved the amalgamation of the Royal Scots and the King's Own Scottish Borderers to form the Royal Scots Borderers and the formation of a single large regiment to be known as the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

Black Watch

Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment)Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)The Black Watch
On 28 March 2006 the regiment was amalgamated with the Royal Scots, the Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment), the Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment), the Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons) and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland, becoming the 1st Battalion of the new regiment.
Under a plan devised by Lieutenant General Alistair Irwin and approved by General Sir Mike Jackson, on 16 December 2004, it was announced that the Black Watch was to join with five other Scottish regiments – the Royal Scots, the King's Own Scottish Borderers, the Royal Highland Fusiliers, The Highlanders and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders – to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland, a single regiment consisting of five regular and two territorial battalions.

46th Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

46th Brigade46th (Highland) Infantry Brigade46th Infantry Brigade
The 7th (Service) Battalion and the 7th (Service) Battalion landed at Boulogne-sur-Mer as part of the 46th Brigade in the 15th (Scottish) Division in July 1915 for service on the Western Front.
7th (Service) Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers (until May 1916)

15th (Scottish) Infantry Division

15th (Scottish) Division15th Division15th Scottish Division
The 7th (Service) Battalion and the 7th (Service) Battalion landed at Boulogne-sur-Mer as part of the 46th Brigade in the 15th (Scottish) Division in July 1915 for service on the Western Front. The 6th Battalion took part in the Normandy landings as part of the 44th Brigade in the 15th (Scottish) Division in June 1944 and saw action at the Battle for Caen later that month and then advanced into Germany.
7th (Service) Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers (merged with the 8th Battalion in May 1916, renamed the 7th/8th Battalion, left May 1916)

155th (South Scottish) Brigade

155th Infantry Brigade155th155th Brigade
The 1/4th (Border) Battalion and the 1/5th (Dumfries & Galloway) Battalion landed in Gallipoli as part of the 155th Brigade in the 52nd (Lowland) Division in June 1915.
2nd (Berwickshire) Volunteer Battalion, Kings Own Scottish Borderers, at Duns

Battle of Fontenoy

Fontenoybataille de Fontenoydefeat
For a period it was known as Semphill's Regiment of Foot, the name under which it fought at the Battle of Fontenoy in 1745 and the Battle of Culloden in 1746.
The first British line, from right to left, was composed of three brigades: first, on the right, the Guards Brigade composed of the 1st, 3rd and 2nd foot guards; second, Ponsonby's brigade of the Royal Scots (1st Foot), Scots Fusiliers (21st Foot), Handaside's (31st Foot); third, Onslow's brigade of Onslow's's (8th Foot), Rothe's/Sempill's (25th Foot), Johnson's (33rd Foot) and Howard's (19th Foot).

Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons)

The HighlandersHighlandersThe Highlanders, 4th Battalion, Royal Regiment of Scotland
On 28 March 2006 the regiment was amalgamated with the Royal Scots, the Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment), the Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment), the Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons) and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland, becoming the 1st Battalion of the new regiment.
''2006: Regiment amalgamated with The Royal Scots, The Royal Highland Fusiliers, The King's Own Scottish Borderers, The Black Watch and The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to form The Royal Regiment of Scotland''

1st Airlanding Brigade (United Kingdom)

1st Airlanding Brigade1st Airlanding1st
One of its heaviest losses during the war was at the ill-fated Battle of Arnhem in which the 7th Battalion, as part of the 1st Airlanding Brigade of 1st Airborne Division, suffered 90% casualties in September 1944; they defended the perimeter in Oosterbeek against 2nd SS Panzer Corps.
When the brigade returned to the United Kingdom, it was assigned the 7th Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers (KOSB) in December 1943, a 2nd Line Territorial Army unit, which had until then been on home defence duties, stationed in the Orkney and Shetland islands.

44th Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

44th Brigade44th (Lowland) Infantry Brigade44th
The 6th Battalion took part in the Normandy landings as part of the 44th Brigade in the 15th (Scottish) Division in June 1944 and saw action at the Battle for Caen later that month and then advanced into Germany.
6th Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers

Options for Change

1990British defence cuts of the mid-1990sBritish defence policy
This was not a new idea: the origins of the combined entity, Royal Scots Borderers, dates from the 1990 Options for Change review, when it was initially announced that the Royal Scots and King's Own Scottish Borderers would amalgamate.
The amalgamation of the Royal Scots and King's Own Scottish Borderers into the Royal Scots Borderers (one battalion) and the Cheshire Regiment and Staffordshire Regiment into the Cheshire and Staffordshire Regiment (one battalion) was suspended in 1994.

3rd Division (United Kingdom)

3rd Division3rd Infantry Division3rd Armoured Division
The 1st Battalion landed in France as part of the 9th Brigade in the 3rd Infantry Division in September 1939 for service with the British Expeditionary Force (BEF); it took part in the Dunkirk evacuation in June 1940 and the Normandy landings in June 1944 and saw action at the Battle for Caen later that month.